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Thread: My fiberglass GT

  1. #101
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    Video

    Nice video. I'd like to get a look under the hood on it. I was wanting to put an LS.in my car too, but I don't think I have the room, the way I have things configured.

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    Prepping for primer

    Well, I'm doing the exciting stuff now, (well not really) but it has to be done. I first sanded the whole car with 80 grit, and filled most of the little imperfections,
    and now I am onto sanding with 180 wet/dry. It's surprising how, what you thought you filled with the 80 grit stage, looked so perfect, until you get on to the 180 grit. After sanding a particular area with the 180, I wipe it down with a wet sponge and then it highlights all the small imperfections. They are getting fewer all the time though, and it's starting to look pretty good.The most tedious areas are the areas where the fender flares blend into the fenders. Fill and sand that's the process, do it enough times and the job is done. I'd say out of three tins of filler, 2 tins end up as dust on the floor, and one stays on the car. I figure I'll be all done in another week or so, and then I'll be off to get some primer. It's going to be so nice to see it in all one color, even if it's just primer.

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    Just Some Dude in Jersey My location The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    I put a full body kit on a GT back in the late 80's. I must've used a gallon of body putty, of which, 75% ended up on my apartment complex parking lot and the pores of my hands. I itched for years after that adventure. Never again!

    Just the thought of you making your entire car out of fiberglass gives me Bondo Itch flashbacks! Scratch, scratch, scratch.........!


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    Bondo itch

    Quote Originally Posted by The Scifi Guy View Post
    I put a full body kit on a GT back in the late 80's. I must've used a gallon of body putty, of which, 75% ended up on my apartment complex parking lot and the pores of my hands. I itched for years after that adventure. Never again!

    Just the thought of you making your entire car out of fiberglass gives me Bondo Itch flashbacks! Scratch, scratch, scratch.........!


    Yeah, after not working with the stuff for a while you have to psych yourself to get back into it. Once you get used to the itching, you don't notice it anymore. Bondo's not to bad, but the fiberglass is another story. I finally got smart and started using the rubber gloves from the fiberglass supply.

  7. #105
    OpelGT.com Übermoderator My location kwilford's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Well, I'm doing the exciting stuff now, (well not really) but it has to be done. I first sanded the whole car with 80 grit, and filled most of the little imperfections, and now I am onto sanding with 180 wet/dry. It's surprising how, what you thought you filled with the 80 grit stage, looked so perfect, until you get on to the 180 grit. After sanding a particular area with the 180, I wipe it down with a wet sponge and then it highlights all the small imperfections. They are getting fewer all the time though, and it's starting to look pretty good.The most tedious areas are the areas where the fender flares blend into the fenders. Fill and sand that's the process, do it enough times and the job is done. I'd say out of three tins of filler, 2 tins end up as dust on the floor, and one stays on the car. I figure I'll be all done in another week or so, and then I'll be off to get some primer. It's going to be so nice to see it in all one color, even if it's just primer.
    I feel for you John. Thirty years after putting my GT up for a "refresh" (which ended up as a "sand blast to bare metal on a rotisserie and muchous rust repair with MIG'd metal") I am shooting the final coats of primer tomorrow. From what I have learned and done, sanding with 80 grit is all that needs to be done before starting to apply the high-build surface primers. No real reason to wet/dry the base surface, as the high build primers take care of any scratches.

    In my case, I shot the first several coats in 2-component epoxy primer on bare metal (the first immediately following a final sand blast to get rid of any corrosion during the year I did the metal work), with some block sanding and scratch/low spot filling in between, still using 80 grit. I shot the latest epoxy wet and fairly thick, and then block sanded with 180 grit, and by then ALL the noticeable scratches and sanding marks were invisible. I'll shoot a final coat of epoxy tomorrow as a wet-on-wet sealer, followed by at least two and likely three coats of high build urethane surface primer, also wet-on-wet. That will be the final rough-sanding surface that will be blocked w/ 240 grit after it thoroughly cures.

    The painter has set that all out for me. He will then shoot a final coat of surface finisher, block it down one last time with 400 grit, followed by a thin flat coat of sealer, urethane base and then clear. I have already shot the inner doors and headlight buckets, the door jams and engine compartment with 2 component urethane UTech, the Limco equivalent of Imron, a very durable industrial paint.

    I have posted a bunch of photos on Facebook which a number of members here have seen. When I am ready to send it to the painter, I'll create a thread here outlining the steps.

    Good luck with your GT; we're all looking forward to seeing it with the final colour. Speaking of which, what colour will that be?
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    Keith Wilford
    Working on the bare-metal, nut & bolt rotisserie restoration of my '71 Opel GT, and may have another GT to build next...

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    Paint Prep

    Quote Originally Posted by kwilford View Post
    I feel for you John. Thirty years after putting my GT up for a "refresh" (which ended up as a "sand blast to bare metal on a rotisserie and muchous rust repair with MIG'd metal") I am shooting the final coats of primer tomorrow. From what I have learned and done, sanding with 80 grit is all that needs to be done before starting to apply the high-build surface primers. No real reason to wet/dry the base surface, as the high build primers take care of any scratches.

    In my case, I shot the first several coats in 2-component epoxy primer on bare metal (the first immediately following a final sand blast to get rid of any corrosion during the year I did the metal work), with some block sanding and scratch/low spot filling in between, still using 80 grit. I shot the latest epoxy wet and fairly thick, and then block sanded with 180 grit, and by then ALL the noticeable scratches and sanding marks were invisible. I'll shoot a final coat of epoxy tomorrow as a wet-on-wet sealer, followed by at least two and likely three coats of high build urethane surface primer, also wet-on-wet. That will be the final rough-sanding surface that will be blocked w/ 240 grit after it thoroughly cures.

    The painter has set that all out for me. He will then shoot a final coat of surface finisher, block it down one last time with 400 grit, followed by a thin flat coat of sealer, urethane base and then clear. I have already shot the inner doors and headlight buckets, the door jams and engine compartment with 2 component urethane UTech, the Limco equivalent of Imron, a very durable industrial paint.

    I have posted a bunch of photos on Facebook which a number of members here have seen. When I am ready to send it to the painter, I'll create a thread here outlining the steps.

    Good luck with your GT; we're all looking forward to seeing it with the final colour. Speaking of which, what colour will that be?
    I find that with fiberglass, the sanding scratches go way deeper than on steel.
    A friend of mine had his fiberglass hood repainted by a buddy of his (quality paint and all) but only used 80 grit on it, and now you can see the sanding scratches in it. Thanks for your input though and good luck with your paint job too. I'm going to be painting it viper blue, the same colour that's in the engine bay.

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    Paint Prep

    I doubt that his friend put on as many coats of primer as you did though. Maybe that's the reason why the scratches are showing.

  10. #108
    Member My location Gordy's Avatar
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    Fiberglass bumpers

    Quote Originally Posted by P.J. Romano View Post
    Front bumper on the GT is just a cosmetic detail, there is almost no real functionality.
    I am running my GT without bumper but I am not using any front air dam. You have created very large air dam which made the car face pretty high. As per my opinion, bumper will bring more visual balance to the front end of your car. It does not have to be chromed; you can paint it black.
    A few years back (7 or 8) I had picked up some parts near me that Tom Cavitao had found on Craig's List. I delivered them to Ron and Tom in Edinboro PA when we made a trip out that way a year or two later. Among the parts were Opel GT bumpers made of fiberglass. They didn't weigh much at all. I had never seen any before or since. You might track down Ron on the site and see if they still are in the garage somewhere.
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    Fiberglass bumpers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordy View Post
    A few years back (7 or 8) I had picked up some parts near me that Tom Cavitao had found on Craig's List. I delivered them to Ron and Tom in Edinboro PA when we made a trip out that way a year or two later. Among the parts were Opel GT bumpers made of fiberglass. They didn't weigh much at all. I had never seen any before or since. You might track down Ron on the site and see if they still are in the garage somewhere.
    Ok, thanks for the info.

  12. #110
    Project 1450 supporter... Site Supporter My location RallyBob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordy View Post
    A few years back (7 or 8) I had picked up some parts near me that Tom Cavitao had found on Craig's List. I delivered them to Ron and Tom in Edinboro PA when we made a trip out that way a year or two later. Among the parts were Opel GT bumpers made of fiberglass. They didn't weigh much at all. I had never seen any before or since. You might track down Ron on the site and see if they still are in the garage somewhere.
    Those were possibly the ones C & R made in the mid 1980's. They spent the money making the molds, made only a few sets of bumpers, then decided there might be liability issues and stopped.

    I believe the molds ended up down south....either to Eric Pare or Lance Russell. More likely Lance as he was racing a GT back in those days.
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    OpelGT.com Übermoderator My location kwilford's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    I find that with fiberglass, the sanding scratches go way deeper than on steel.

    A friend of mine had his fiberglass hood repainted by a buddy of his (quality paint and all) but only used 80 grit on it, and now you can see the sanding scratches in it.

    I doubt that his friend put on as many coats of primer as you did though. Maybe that's the reason why the scratches are showing.
    I hadn't thought about sanding on fiberglass, although I would think that resin/fiberglass would be at least as tough as the filler and subsequent primers.

    One thing I have learned about bodywork: it is ALL in the preparation. The final coat of paint may seem important, but the end product is all about what is underneath. I recall hearing about "12 coats of hand rubbed lacquer" as describing a good paint job (in the old days when lacquer was used). But in reality, it's the five coats of block-sanded high build surface finisher primer that is underneath the very thin base coat that creates the high quality modern paint job. The clear coats in modern paint creates depth; the smooth flat primers creates the mirror surfaces that catch the eye.

    I am off to my temporary paint booth today to shoot the next-to-last coats of primer, before winter finally arrives in the Great White North...
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    Working on the bare-metal, nut & bolt rotisserie restoration of my '71 Opel GT, and may have another GT to build next...

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    Paint Prep

    Quote Originally Posted by kwilford View Post
    I hadn't thought about sanding on fiberglass, although I would think that resin/fiberglass would be at least as tough as the filler and subsequent primers.

    One thing I have learned about bodywork: it is ALL in the preparation. The final coat of paint may seem important, but the end product is all about what is underneath. I recall hearing about "12 coats of hand rubbed lacquer" as describing a good paint job (in the old days when lacquer was used). But in reality, it's the five coats of block-sanded high build surface finisher primer that is underneath the very thin base coat that creates the high quality modern paint job. The clear coats in modern paint creates depth; the smooth flat primers creates the mirror surfaces that catch the eye.

    I am off to my temporary paint booth today to shoot the next-to-last coats of primer, before winter finally arrives in the Great White North...
    Yes Keith, it's all in the prep work. Back in the late 80's I painted my fiberglass 74 trans-am myself in my shop, without a paint booth. My very first paint job. I painted it viper red, base/clear, and people couldn't believe it was my first paint job. But it's definitely all in the preparation. My thinking was that if I piled on the clear coat, I could rub it down and buff it smooth in case there were any dust nibs in it. Yes the prep work is boring and tedious, but that's what really costs the big bucks if someone else has to do it for you. The thing that makes it a little harder on the opel, is that there aren't very many long straight surfaces like many north american cars of the day. So even more time and patience is required. I remember hitting a deer with my opel years ago, (when it was still steel) and the body shop guy's were cringing at the thought of having to work on it. The hardest thing I found, when assembling the body, was no real definite reference points to measurements from, because of the curvy round shape of it. Anyway, I hope you get your car painted before the snow starts flying.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Yes Keith, it's all in the prep work. <SNIP>
    I remember hitting a deer with my opel years ago, (when it was still steel) and the body shop guys were cringing at the thought of having to work on it. The hardest thing I found, when assembling the body, was no real definite reference points to measurements from, because of the curvy round shape of it. Anyway, I hope you get your car painted before the snow starts flying.
    Speaking of which, I have a deep dent in the rear lower pan and the weld-on dent puller won't handle it. Since I can't be inside to hammer out (it is almost impossible to even each it) and outside to handle the dollies at the same time, has anyone got a recommendation?

    Now returning you to the previously (un-pirated) thread!

    Doug

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    Dent in pan

    If its possible, try heating it with a torch, and then pull with a slide hammer. Or maybe you need another pair of hands to do the dolly work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    If its possible, try heating it with a torch, and then pull with a slide hammer. Or maybe you need another pair of hands to do the dolly work.
    Thanks, Any recommendations for what "tip" to use on the slide hammer? The one I have uses a fairly large sheet metal screw that I am sure will pull out of the thin sheet metal in the pan at the first pop. I was looking at the HF kit mentioned above but I don't see much help there. I have heated the area with Oxy/Ace but trying to get a blunt surface and hammer on it is pretty tough.

    I'll see if the weld on studs can be used with heat added.

    Doug

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    Quote Originally Posted by slracer View Post
    Thanks, Any recommendations for what "tip" to use on the slide hammer? The one I have uses a fairly large sheet metal screw that I am sure will pull out of the thin sheet metal in the pan at the first pop. I was looking at the HF kit mentioned above but I don't see much help there. I have heated the area with Oxy/Ace but trying to get a blunt surface and hammer on it is pretty tough.

    I'll see if the weld on studs can be used with heat added.

    Doug
    Is the dent in the tail panel? Not sure if I understood exactly where it was. Can you post a picture? You mentioned the dent is "deep" or "sharp". Usually that means the metal is stretched and will not flatten out again very well. I work for Dent Wizard and in areas with limited access we usually use a glue puck with hot glue attaching it to the dented area and then use a slide hammer to repeatedly pull the dent out to beyond what would be flat. Then using a knock down punch carefully tap it back to being level. You have infinite control tapping it down and only limited control on pulling it out with the slide hammer is the reason for that. Normally if you are going to drill a hole to insert a screw or weld a tab to the metal the thinking is the paint will be damaged so you may as well have it repaired in a conventional manner with filler and paint at a body shop.
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    Dent Repair

    Yeah, with dents, it's all about location. The more wide open the area the easier they are to pull out. But if they are close to a seam or vertical structure they are tough. The only thing that I have seen that works in these tougher areas, is the weld on stud gun, but average guys like us don't have one of those.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordy View Post
    Is the dent in the tail panel? Not sure if I understood exactly where it was. Can you post a picture? You mentioned the dent is "deep" or "sharp". Usually that means the metal is stretched and will not flatten out again very well. I work for Dent Wizard and in areas with limited access we usually use a glue puck with hot glue attaching it to the dented area and then use a slide hammer to repeatedly pull the dent out to beyond what would be flat. Then using a knock down punch carefully tap it back to being level. You have infinite control tapping it down and only limited control on pulling it out with the slide hammer is the reason for that. Normally if you are going to drill a hole to insert a screw or weld a tab to the metal the thinking is the paint will be damaged so you may as well have it repaired in a conventional manner with filler and paint at a body shop.
    Rather than pirate any more time on John B's thread, take a look here: http://www.opelgt.com/forums/2d-body...me-easy-4.html. The best pic is on post #70 with #72 & 73 showing a bit more. Lower right hand rear pan. The center of the panel also took a sharp hit (punctured the metal with something) so I started the mod. I'm trying to get the dent raised to a level that there isn't too much filler. It doesn't look too bad in the pics, but the center is about an inch low. Thanks, Doug

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    Front End Removal

    I decided to remove the front end to prepare it for paint. When working alone it is always good to devise a way to make certain tasks easier, so I made up some special brackets and attached them to the ends of a nylon strap, for lifting the front section off the car. These brackets grip the inner lip of the fender without slipping off. Then I hook up a come along winch and start cranking. I have some pictures of this process and some other general views.
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    More Pic's

    More pictures.
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