Advice Needed: Opel for Electric Conversion? What to beware of?
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Thread: Advice Needed: Opel for Electric Conversion? What to beware of?

  1. #1
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    Advice Needed: Opel for Electric Conversion? What to beware of?

    Hi Everyone,

    I like building things from junk, or near junk. I'm not mechanically-minded (I'm not a car guy and I don't have car-guy instincts), so, I've made some electric bicycles and 90% of an electric motorbike from an old donor carcass and forklift parts.

    I want to convert a small, light car to electric. I have always liked the look of old Corvettes. Corvettes aren't very light, and old ones are expensive, even carcasses. So someone said "Why not convert an Opel GT?" and I said "What's an Opel?", and they said "It's like, half a Corvette." Which, I think people have said in a derogatory way but when I heard that I was like "Perfect!"

    I'm cheap. Ideally, I have a driveable, not-hideous vehicle for $3-5k. That's the spirit of this build. Budget. I'm poor and building things from garbage.

    I don't care about anything being original, a real restoration, or any of that. I like how the outside of an Opel GT looks. I'm not picky about the rest. If the suspension is gone but I can just go throw in suspension from an old Civic or whatever, and it works, I wouldn't care that it's not original under the hood.

    I'm not picky about performance. I'd like it to be a fun-ish daily driver, that's super cheap to run (because it's electric and tiny). I'm not racing. If it can climb a hill at highway speeds, and stop when I push on the brakes, good enough.

    Things I don't care about because it's converting to electric:

    - Anything engine related. Carbs need replacing? Head gasket blown? Don't care!
    - Anything gasoline or fuel related. Tank has a hole in it? Don't care!
    - Anything exhaust related. Muffler is rotten? Don't care!

    So...

    I've found an Opel for sale for $1500-ish (Canadian, ~$1100 USD). I'm going to take a look at it soon. I don't know what to look for.

    - The owner claims it should run (I don't really care except to get it home, I'm removing the engine).
    - Paint has been sanded off in patches, presumably to remove rust, so it's currently ugly. I will need to eventually paint it.
    - Outsides look okay-ish, no dents or rust through but I'll check.
    - Seats are chewed right up, need replacing (don't care if original, any seat that would fit is fine for me).
    - Claims the floor panels are rusted through in spots (I can weld, exterior holes scare me because they're cosmetic, floor holes I presume I can just patch with sheet metal).

    ... when I go look at it, what should I be sure to check?

    I'm especially concerned about all the things I don't know to ask about:

    - Parts/Components that would be deal-breakers for my ghetto budget.
    - Things that a guy with tools probably shouldn't or couldn't fix himself.
    - Reasons not to buy a given car.
    - Anything else here.

    My biggest reason not to buy it right now, is that there's no trunk or hatch. I'd almost like to take out the grinder and make one. I'll live with it if I have to.

    Since I'm a complete beginner, I can't be much help to anyone but my way of giving back to the community for all their help is to take lots of photos and document the build so that at least people get to see how their advice made a difference.

    I have more questions, but, "Part 1: Help me figure out what to inspect" is today's mission.

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    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    What I'm hearing is that you have no money and bicycle mechanic skills(Same as me) and you want to make a very small unibody exotic weird Euro car electric.

    I would recommend that you do your experiment on a less exotic car that isn't unibody FIRST, then once you have learned a bit more try doing it to a very space challenged Opel GT.

    Right off the bat you're going to need a vacuum pump and tank to make the brakes work.

    Making an electric GT has been done before. A guy in Florida made one with a golf cart motor and a custom adapter to mate it to the stock 4 sp transmission. It didn't have much range and it had so much torque that he had to start off in 2nd gear. Because electrics have such a wide rpm range, he could have theoretically stayed in 2nd all the way up to 100mph, but that would probably have blown up the tranny.

    I, personally, would love to make an electric Opel and I have lots of skills and work with electronics every day, but I still don't think I could pull off making a decent car with decent mileage for reasonable expenditure. I don't think the technology has evolved enough yet. The voltage/amperage control system is going to be one of your hardest challenges. Making an adapter to attach your motor to the drivetrain will be the other biggest challenge.
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    1000 Post Club tealcarver's Avatar
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    The biggest thing is RUST. There are places to check like under the doors, the frame, remember the body is a unibody, so any major rist is going to be a problem. Check the location of the battery , not only rust, but visible damage done by battery acid. Check for rust anywhere on the car. Bubbling paint, and obvious rust. More GT's are lost to rust than any other issue. So my advice is to look for rust anywhere, especially if the car has been stored outside. Hope this helps.

    Bob
    71 Chrome Yellow GT

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    3000 Post Club Site Supporter P.J. Romano's Avatar
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    It has been done:
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    Old racers never die. They just go bench racing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Scifi Guy
    I would recommend that you do your experiment on a less exotic car that isn't unibody FIRST, then once you have learned a bit more try doing it to a very space challenged Opel GT. Right off the bat you're going to need a vacuum pump and tank to make the brakes work.
    Noted. However, I don't need help on the electric conversion side of things. I got that covered, I know all those pitfalls and things that have to be done with respect to that, and already have most of those components. I do have a vacuum pump but, I'd be surprised if I'd need it on a vehicle so light.

    I have a 350lb 3phase motor from a forklift. I have a source of free lithium batteries (now dried up, but I should have enough). For speed control there are 3 or 4 DIY options available now, as well as some hackjobs from existing OEM EVs in the boneyards. I'm not worried about range or cost on the EV side of it, I'm good there.

    For me, I have no interest in building a less exotic car just as a learning experience. This is my learning experience. It's $1500 to get my foot in the door. I wouldn't get anything out of a conversion on a bigger body-on-frame vehicle that I don't want to be electric. So, I might be slow, and I might get frustrated, but, I want to have something to look forward to when I work on it.

    Thank you for the warning, but I'm comfortable on the EV requirements side of it. It's the mechanic side of things I'm ignorant to.


    Quote Originally Posted by tealcarver
    The biggest thing is RUST. There are places to check like under the doors, the frame, remember the body is a unibody, so any major rist is going to be a problem.
    I'll be taking pictures, and hopefully posting them here before I buy, but, how much rust is too much?

    If it's missing parts on the interior, I can just tin-bash some steel replacements and weld them in. If it's on the exterior, then I care about that being ugly because I don't think my bodywork is in the ballpark of cosmetic improvement.

    The things I'm worried about are the parts of cars that don't even register in my mind as things.

    Like, to me, suspension is just... there. And steering is just... there. I might walk up to a car and look right at a serious problem and not be able to recognize that it's a problem or why.

    So, it would be helpful to me to have a little more context of, how much rust is too much, in what places, and why.

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    Hoosier Opeler Site Supporter rrossjr's Avatar
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    1000 Post Club kwschumm's Avatar
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    If you see rust on the body there is probably 10 times more that amount in places you won't normally see. On a unibody car the structural rigidity comes from an intact body - if it is compromised by rust then it can be bad. If you don't see rust on the body you still need to look deeper since bondo covers a lot of sins.

    Here's the issue as I see it. For an electric GT you'll add 500-1000lbs worth of batteries to a chassis that is already marginal. Yes, you're tearing out the engine but you're adding batteries, motors, etc that may exceed that weight. More weight means less braking performance and the brakes are also marginal so those would need upgraded. Not sure how much power you want but the body may need strengthening if you exceed the original HP by a good margin.

    All of this is doable but it's more difficult for someone who is not familiar with automotive mechanics. Only you can assess that.
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    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    So, all you want to know is what areas need to be in good enough condition to maintain structural integrity. Then it's rockers, floorboards, and frame rails. Those are the critical areas that send our cars to the crusher. They're a PIA to replace. Our cars generally aren't badly rusted above those areas. Use a magnet to test those areas to make sure they aren't filled with body putty. Our rear axle differentials can only handle about 200hp, so you'll likely want some sort of gear reduction. You could probably cut out the floor under the gas tank and design your battery packs to be installed from below, that way you won't have to cut into the body to make a "trunk lid" to mess with your batteries. This will maintain structural rigidity. You won't need the radiator and you could use some of the large amount of space up front for more batteries. For good handling, you generally want even weight distribution on all 4 wheels. A stock GT weighs 2100lbs, so you want to shoot for an even approximately 500-550lbs per wheel. The Florida guy in the video says that he shifted about 200 pounds of the weight to the rear, so he's a little light on the front end and had to weaken the spring in the front and strengthen the springs in the rear. That sounds great for adding extra weight to the rear axle to increase traction to combat the high electric motor torque, but I'm curious if that weight shift was detrimental to the traction up front when taking turns at speed. Opel GT's are sports cars whose greatest attribute is that they have a low center of gravity and can take turns fast. That's what they're best at. Try to keep weight balance in mind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwschumm
    For an electric GT you'll add 500-1000lbs worth of batteries
    Whoa whoa whoa. Full stop.

    15 years ago, yes, this would be true, when you had to use lead-acid batteries.

    To get ~100km (60mile) range at highway speeds, I need about 15,000 watt-hours of battery pack.

    Tesla packs, all included, are 207 Wh/kg. So... 72kg (160 lbs).

    Tesla packs are expensive and not in the spirit of this build (or my wallet), so that'd be ambitious to match those numbers, but, yeah, I'll probably shoot for 150-200km (90-120mile) range at highway speed if I can. If I only get 100km (60mile) range, meh. I'm content. Bulk will be a bigger issue than weight I suspect. There's just not much room.

    Working with an EV motorbike, room was even less of a luxury than on a small sports car. I bet this will feel like a vacation in comparison.

    Quote Originally Posted by kwschumm
    and the brakes are also marginal so those would need upgraded.
    I'm probably using an AC motor, so, braking power will be regenerative in addition to the OEM brakes. That'll help. I'm somewhat interested in how hard it is to modernize the brakes anyway. Kinda ditto for front suspension and steering while I'm at it, if it could be a junkyard project and not hunting around for antique parts.


    Quote Originally Posted by The Scifi Guy View Post
    So, all you want to know is what areas need to be in good enough condition to maintain structural integrity. Then it's rockers, floorboards, and frame rails. Those are the critical areas that send our cars to the crusher.
    Noted. It won't be up on a lift, and likely has all the carpeting in place. Do I crawl underneath or, would most owners be okay me taking apart the interior to inspect? I'm kinda new to the buying process of semi-junked classics.

    Our rear axle differentials can only handle about 200hp, so you'll likely want some sort of gear reduction.
    Naw, I'm not making a performance vehicle. 200hp is almost certainly more than I could ever churn out with my junkyard forklift motor rescue. It's a beast but only rated for like, 25hp continuous in an industrial application. I can probably push it to ten times that with a little bit of cooling, but, realistically I'm not intending to race it or break any laws. I doubt I'll ever go faster than highway speeds.

    You could probably cut out the floor under the gas tank and design your battery packs to be installed from below, that way you won't have to cut into the body to make a "trunk lid" to mess with your batteries. This will maintain structural rigidity.
    I wouldn't mind adding in some square tubing to compensate. Underneath is harder for me (no lift), but, like many things, it's just work.

    Ideally I'd get the batteries as low as possible. I'd love to be able to use the bottom 4" to build a skateboard platform, but I suspect there just isn't much for ground clearance. I should be able to get weight lower than the Texan couple did with them right up on the parcel shelf.

    Good advice all around though, thanks muchly.

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    Of course you have to post pics and update your project as you go along. Good luck.

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    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    Okay, that's GOOD! You have humble aspirations for this project mileage and speed-wise. That means you probably won't have to go hog wild chopping up everything.

    Can you give us a rough guesstimate of what you think the motor, batteries, control circuitry, etc. total weight will be?

    How many cubic feet of batteries do you envision? Can they be broken down into smaller units?

    How do you envision mating the motor to the drive train? Do you plan on some form of gear box or CVT or are you planning on direct drive to the rear axle?

    There's no need to change the front suspension, it's quite adequate and low to the ground. You'll gain nothing by changing it. They sell different height and stiffness leaf springs for our cars or you can remove a leaf like the guy in the video and/or change the ball joints to lower the car.

    My car is heavily modified from head to toe, so I'm totally cool with major alterations. Many GT's have their belly pans rusted/caved in/damaged, you have no need for the air channeling aspects of the belly pan to cool a radiator. There's a huge amount of space up front there, but it's almost impossible to access stuff there because of the belly pan. My car had the belly pan partially cut out by the previous owner to do a headlight mod, having access to that area from the bottom made all sorts of mods a cinch to do. You might consider doing something like that. You're going to need to cut and fasten all sorts of brackets and braces to support your electronics/motor/batteries and such, so accept that fact and also understand that the interior behind the seats is entirely alterable. I totally hollowed out the rear of my car and rebuilt with wood and metal stuff. These pics will give you an idea of what these cars look like with the interior all stripped out:

    The inside of the car behind the seats, tank and spare tire shelf removed, rear deck below the window still intact

    IMG_5024.JPG

    I rebuilt in wood a larger storage area

    Early stage rear interior.JPG Getting closer.jpg

    There's a little room under the luggage shelf to put stuff

    Hinged Hidey Hole.jpg

    This is the shape of the fuel tank to give you an idea of the volume one of them takes up. It's not much, they're about 30" long x 15" wide and they average about 5" high tapering to a shallow triangle at 12" high.

    Tank 2.jpgTank 8.jpg

    This pics shows the engine bay

    IMG_4969.jpg

    And from the other angle showing some of the area I talked about in front of the radiator. It's only showing half of it, there's more behind a crossbar. The pic also shows some of the belly pan cut away. Normally the battery kind of sits on the cut out area.

    IMG_4993.JPG

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    Über Genius First opel 1981's Avatar
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    I'll be the bad guy and say it like it is...

    I see the signs of another Opel GT meeting its death.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Scifi Guy View Post
    Can you give us a rough guesstimate of what you think the motor, batteries, control circuitry, etc. total weight will be?
    Current motor is maybe around 350lbs one guy thought. It's over 200lbs, I don't know if it's quite that heavy though. My heart is not set on it (nor is my heart set on this Opal, if I show up in the next couple days and it's rusted through, I'll probably find some other random small car as the donor).

    Controller is probably 10-20lbs.

    Batteries, I dunno, 300lbs perhaps? Depends on how many I stuff in.

    Heavy gauge wiring and other incidentals (vac pump, heater, etc), maybe 50lbs to round up?

    Being removed:

    - Engine (including accessories)
    - Exhaust
    - Muffler
    - Gas tank (and fuel)
    - Probably spare tire.
    - Maybe the rad, or maybe swap for smaller one.

    How many cubic feet of batteries do you envision? Can they be broken down into smaller units?
    2-4 milk crates depending on range.

    The batteries I'm using are standard 18650s (18mm x 65.0mm, thumb-sized). It's convenient to arrange them in 4x5 plastic clip-together grids (roughly fist-sized), but I can do whatever.

    Depends how many end up in my motorbike.

    Ideally I could fit them between frame rails or something, it's one of the advantages of using these little cells, I'm not stuck with toaster-sized blocks. But, otherwise, they're very compartmentalized.

    How do you envision mating the motor to the drive train? Do you plan on some form of gear box or CVT or are you planning on direct drive to the rear axle?
    Option #1 (10%): With how light the car is, I could almost just direct drive it. If so, I'm half considering tilting the diff upwards a few degrees (for ground clearance) and mounting the motor right to it in what would be under the parcel shelf. The motor is probably as heavy as the batteries.

    Motor is 11" diameter, 16" long (so, would protrude 5.5" off of prop shaft center, which I suspect is too low without tilting diff upwards.


    Option #2 (80%): The normal way, keep the tranny and make a coupler and a plate to mate to it. This adds a safety advantage of a mechanical disconnect and, gearing. Also adds a bunch of weight to keep the tranny and prop shaft though, and puts the weight up front.


    Option #3 (6%): Replace rear axle with independent suspension and/or an OEM EV motor/transaxle instead. I don't have one, don't know that I want to buy one, though they're not overly expensive, just seems like a lot more complexity.


    Option #4 (4%): AWD or FWD kind of swap. I'd like to drive year-round and I'm intimidated by RWD on snowy/icy roads.


    No CVT or anything fancy. No need.


    Thanks for all the pics, interesting stuff.

    Now I'm going to be upset if this GT ends up being a rustbucket it would be foolish to purchase. I'll give more pics and descriptions and such if I end up moving forward with this particular vehicle. Don't want to get any further ahead of myself.
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    1000 Post Club kwschumm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattsAwesomeStuff View Post
    Whoa whoa whoa. Full stop.

    15 years ago, yes, this would be true, when you had to use lead-acid batteries.

    To get ~100km (60mile) range at highway speeds, I need about 15,000 watt-hours of battery pack.

    Tesla packs, all included, are 207 Wh/kg. So... 72kg (160 lbs).

    Tesla packs are expensive and not in the spirit of this build (or my wallet), so that'd be ambitious to match those numbers, but, yeah, I'll probably shoot for 150-200km (90-120mile) range at highway speed if I can. If I only get 100km (60mile) range, meh. I'm content. Bulk will be a bigger issue than weight I suspect. There's just not much room.
    This is a personal bias but I can't stand lithium batteries. I've spent too much of my career trying to make them read out wear/charge/temperature/discharge rate/range/etc and charge efficiently, without blowing up and catching fire, to care much about their finicky nature. I'd never own one. But, as the saying goes, familiarity breeds content.

    If you pursue this project I do wish you nothing but the best for luck and success.
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    This is a personal bias but I can't stand lithium batteries.
    *nod*. Everyone has their pet peeves. You can choose what you're comfortable tinkering with and what doesn't interest you.

    But, the world has moved on and left you behind.

    Bias ply tires, carburators, leaded gasoline, and lead-acid batteries are just obsolete relics for cars.

    Corporations are greedy, they haven't switched to Lithium because they're passionate about a personal quirk, they've switched because they're cost effective and more reliable than the alternatives.


    I've done the math on lead-acids. There is zero reason to use them. They are massively heavier, more bulky, hard to get power out of quickly without wasting half of it, hard to use beyond 50% capacity without damaging them, expensive, and, most importantly, for their very short lifespan will not even recover the cost of the gasoline they replaced per mile, even if the rest of the conversion was free. Literally, if even electricity was also free, battery cost alone in terms of the amount of miles you can drive before the batteries need replacing, is less than the cost of gasoline to have just kept driving.

    You don't have to like it, you don't have to work on it, there's a million hobby fish in the sea, but, that's the reality.

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    1000 Post Club kwschumm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattsAwesomeStuff View Post
    *nod*. Everyone has their pet peeves. You can choose what you're comfortable tinkering with and what doesn't interest you.

    But, the world has moved on and left you behind.

    Bias ply tires, carburators, leaded gasoline, and lead-acid batteries are just obsolete relics for cars.

    Corporations are greedy, they haven't switched to Lithium because they're passionate about a personal quirk, they've switched because they're cost effective and more reliable than the alternatives.


    I've done the math on lead-acids. There is zero reason to use them. They are massively heavier, more bulky, hard to get power out of quickly without wasting half of it, hard to use beyond 50% capacity without damaging them, expensive, and, most importantly, for their very short lifespan will not even recover the cost of the gasoline they replaced per mile, even if the rest of the conversion was free. Literally, if even electricity was also free, battery cost alone in terms of the amount of miles you can drive before the batteries need replacing, is less than the cost of gasoline to have just kept driving.

    You don't have to like it, you don't have to work on it, there's a million hobby fish in the sea, but, that's the reality.
    Your wording is insulting, lithium batteries haven't left me behind, I reject them for studied reasons of technology familiarity, personal safety, environmental health, and for the upcoming Peak Lithium moment that will rival petroleum shortages of the 70's.
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    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    I wouldn't call his wording insulting, but it was demeaning. Ken was polite to you, he just had bad long-time personal experience with lithium. They DO like to explode when over charged or damaged, after all.

    Maybe you were having a bad day, toss him an apology and it's water under the bridge.



    Understand that almost everyone on this website is a mechanical engineer. Many of us work in or have worked in some very high tech industries.

    Also understand that we frequently get new, enthusiastic, prospective Opel fixer-uppers who almost immediately want to rip everything out of the car that makes it an Opel and drop a Hemi or a twin turbo V12 or an engine that runs on tea leaves into these rare, stylish, wonderful to drive cars. Most are ill-equipped to complete their fantasy and the WHOLE car. Generally, they get the locomotive engine wedged into the engine compartment and their project never goes beyond that point and the car ends up on Craig's List and then the junkyard.

    So, we're skeptical.

    But don't get us wrong, WE WANT YOU TO SUCCEED. We would love to see you pull off a nice, thoughtful, stand the test of time, very drivable, electric conversion to a GT. I, personally, regard performing an electric conversion as my final Opel project and I look forward to learning from your efforts, whether you succeed or not, and I'm with you all the way as long as you do your project intelligently and professionally. I'm the #2 poster on this site and I'm trying to speak for us all in regards to this.

    If it seems that we're giving you a hard time, well, we are and we aren't. Engineers have to question everything and take all things into account. By asking you for extreme detail about what your attempting, we may help you make a better decision.....or you might be correct and we'll learn something. When I built my heavily modified car, I regarded it as a group website project. Although it might not have seemed like that to most. I listened to the members' (sometimes/most times) critical comments and sometimes they were good advice and sometimes they were balderdash. In the end I made a pretty cool car.

    We would like to do the same with you.

    P.J. Romano and slracer like this.

  20. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Scifi Guy View Post
    I wouldn't call his wording insulting, but it was demeaning. Ken was polite to you,
    And I think I was polite to him in return, friendly even. I deliberately took time to separate personal preferences from the science. I even quantified twice that everyone's allowed to feel a certain way about something and that you don't have to like what other people do. It's fine to say you don't like or don't trust fuel injectors or LEDs or anything other than bias ply tires. No one has to justify why they are or aren't interested in something, or for sharing their opinion on it.

    But then what I said was that the world has moved on from those being popular, or justified concerns, as a whole. Same as it has with other automotive technology. I don't think that's demeaning to point that out, I wasn't criticizing his personal view, I was just saying the rest of the world doesn't agree.

    There are, what, 30 electric vehicle models being manufactured right now, with another 20 set for release in the next year or so? How many of them use lead-acid batteries? Zero. How many of them use lithium? All of them. Pretty conclusive.

    How many cell phones use lithium batteries? Literally all of them. For 20(?) years.

    How many laptops use lithium batteries? All of them. Again for 20-ish years.

    It's unanimous adoption world-wide in almost every industry.

    If the combined efforts of the best and most qualified engineers on the planet, and the monies invested by corporations who's job is to make money (and who are subject to liability concerns for safety issues), all unanimously agree on the best battery technology, it would be silly to argue on a technological merit against the combined braintrust of the whole planet. And I don't think he was doing that. He was just expressing his personal opinion that he doesn't like them.

    If he was asserting that the rest of the world's combined engineers have all together combined reached the wrong conclusion, then yes, I owe him an apology for being so blunt in dismissing it. But I don't think he was saying that and I wasn't presuming he was.

    Generally, they get the locomotive engine wedged into the engine compartment and their project never goes beyond that point and the car ends up on Craig's List and then the junkyard.
    Where are these abandoned projects, and how may I intercept them on their way to the junkyard for pennies on the dollar? I'll happily adopt someone else's failures and add my own to it

    If it seems that we're giving you a hard time
    No not at all. I appreciate being part of a community where one doesn't have to sugarcoat every bit of critical thought because people have so much ego attached to their opinions. I can certainly handle what I think others might consider to being talked down to by someone taking the time not to help, but only to set up a future "told ya so" and say they think I'm likely to fail. I don't know that it's productive, but it doesn't upset me none.

    Similarly, I'd like the advantage of not having to walk on eggshells around others, or for people to attribute criticism as malice.

    It'd be shallow and disingenuous to apologize for something I didn't mean, so I can't. Most I can be sorry for is if 2 attempts at making sure I wasn't making someone's opinion invalid wasn't sufficient. I don't know if 3 would have been the right number or, if I should just not disagree with other members until/unless people are more used to me. But none-the-less I've upset someone so, sorry to the community for not being more careful about that.

  21. #19
    Über Genius First opel 1981's Avatar
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    I just heard on the news that a house fire was caused by the lithium batteries inside a hoverboard.

    I don't want lithium batteries under my butt when they decide to catch fire.
    Opel GTs are not GM products
    ̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶— ̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶ ̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶ ̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—
    Humans are not an endangered species!
    ̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶— ̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶ ̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶ ̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—̶̶̶̶̶̶̶—

  22. #20
    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    I recently bought a portable emergency jump starter called Genius Start that uses lithiums.

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