Friday rant
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    3000 Post Club Site Supporter P.J. Romano's Avatar
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    Friday rant

    I always hated oil industry greedy attitude. They constantly kept increasing price of gas threatening with shortage of oil when existing sources are depleted. It turned out, the world has plenty of reserve. Did they decrease prices? Of course not.

    Valve lifter failure on the way to Carlisle made me think further: Modern oil products are so against our old cars.

    1. Modern engine oils do not have zinc which is needed for flat tappets.
    2. Gas contains ethanol which is ruining our fuel system.
    3. The latest transmission GL5 oils are bad for synchro rings in our transmission.

    The only karma is that the world is slowly but surely switching to electrical cars. What brings the question: What will be the future of gas powered classic cars? Will they be in museums only?
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    1000 Post Club kwschumm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P.J. Romano View Post
    I always hated oil industry greedy attitude. They constantly kept increasing price of gas threatening with shortage of oil when existing sources are depleted. It turned out, the world has plenty of reserve. Did they decrease prices? Of course not.
    Sounds a lot like Starbucks- raising prices every time there's a "coffee shortage" but not once have the prices dropped.
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    Senior Member Timbo's Avatar
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    Ask the guys that collected buggies and wagons. Certainly, those smelly and loud machines weren't going to last and buggies and wagons would be back. They might even have a few mint ones stashed in a barn. I heard they were having a hard time finding blacksmiths to make the metal rimmed wheels. Thank god they are finally making some decent 36" rims.
    Technology moves on. Cars are around until they get replaced. Electric cars are not a strong enough draw. Just a different colored horse. Now drone transportation is another thing. Can you imagine Gordo modding a drone transport? Red Baron! At first, this seems like it could be a good thing. With everyone flying around, the roads will be empty and it will be enjoyable to drive again. That is, until they stop maintaining the roads. So maybe 20 years before they are good only for buggies and wagons.
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    Hoosier Opeler Site Supporter rrossjr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P.J. Romano View Post
    I always hated oil industry greedy attitude. They constantly kept increasing price of gas threatening with shortage of oil when existing sources are depleted. It turned out, the world has plenty of reserve. Did they decrease prices? Of course not.

    Valve lifter failure on the way to Carlisle made me think further: Modern oil products are so against our old cars.

    1. Modern engine oils do not have zinc which is needed for flat tappets.
    2. Gas contains ethanol which is ruining our fuel system.
    3. The latest transmission GL5 oils are bad for synchro rings in our transmission.

    The only karma is that the world is slowly but surely switching to electrical cars. What brings the question: What will be the future of gas powered classic cars? Will they be in museums only?
    P.J.,
    I agree that new fuels and oils are at best sub-optimal (and occasionally downright destructive) to 50+ year old cars. Fortunately, there is a cottage industry that tries to support the old car hobby
    by producing more compatible products like higher zinc oil and additives to help mitigate high ethanol fuels. Still, the market is relatively small, so these are niche products and likely to become harder to find
    as combustion engines become less commonplace. I recall reading an interesting analysis in the Hagerty magazine about the future of the old car hobby, and if it is compatible with the coming wave of
    autonomous and electric vehicles. I couldn't find it online, but this story from NPR raises a lot of the same points. I think someday the old car guys might be like the dudes in Cuba who fabricate their own stuff to keep their jalopies on the road.
    Cheers,
    Ron in Indy
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    Über Genius First opel 1981's Avatar
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    When I was a kid, a candy bar was 10 cents.
    The same candy bar. today, is $1.19

    When I was a kid, and candy bars were 10 cents, gas was 45 cents per gallon (went as high as 57 cents that summer)
    The same gallon of gas, today, costs about $3.35

    So, how are we getting screwed on gas but not on candy bars?

    (btw, when gas was 29 cents, candy bars were 5 cents)
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    I always got a laugh when industry "experts" like Trilby Lundberg would explain that the rise in oil prices were due to: refinery change-over to winter blend.......refinery change-over to summer blend........refinery stoppage due to mishap........refinery stoppage due to maintenance.........disruption in supply due to a pipeline leak........disruption in supply due to a fire at some refinery.........disruption in supply due to worries about Mid-East tensions...........disruption in supply due to a high forecasted atlantic hurricane season........wall street worries about a hurricane brewing in the atlantic........wall street worries about a hurricane brewing in the carribbean..........wall street worries that there is not enough refinery capacity........wall street worries that there might be too much refinery capacity.............not enough storage tanks..........not enough investment in refineries since the 1980's...........

    Then, on our way to energy independence, that Bakken oil was threatening the Saudi's, so they tanked the price of their price per barrel, making our US oil too much per barrel, this, tanking our Bakken Oil Field production.

    Meanwhile, a great anti-knock additive called MTBE is deemed a cancer hazard, so, we devote much of our corn production to the making of ethanol; which drives up the overall cost of our food supplies, while destroying the gaskets, lines and seals of our carburated fuel systems, from our small weed whackers to our classic cars and outboard motors.

    Much in the way I have to pay 20 bucks for a gallon of ethanol free gas from Home Depot in order to run my Stihl Weed Trimmer, maybe we will have to go to a specialized fuel dealer to purchase gas approved for our classic cars. Of course, to own a classic car, we will need a special license from the government before we are allowed to purchase up to 2 classic cars per household; per lifetime. This license will cost 4 thousand dollars a year, cause, well, we have to get that tax infrastructure dollars to rebuild our roadways somehow, right?

    Failure to pay for this annual license to own a classic, gas powered car, will result in the confiscation and crushing of said car and imprisonment for up to 10 years.

    Car museums may have examples of gas powered cars, but they will be static displays only, their engines having been removed long ago and sent to China to make more electric personal mobility vehicles.
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    2000 Post Club soybean's Avatar
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    Very well said Mike, PJ and all. Out here, when I say that, I mean on the Farm(s) how are we going to "plug in"? Right now there are 4 Diesel Pumps running water to 6 self winding reels pulling Gun carts to them. What is going to power them, and how are we going to "plug in" at the ponds we are irrigating from? I just don't see it happening. I have seen newer tractors and combines that are in the midwest, that you have to have a mechanic drive a combustion engine service truck, to the above items, to change an Air Filter. B.S. I say.
    I have seen new tractors that have a "brain" computer, fail, so you can't raise the lift arms on the tractor. They "only" cost 1500.00 or more to replace. So technology has come a great way, but it will never be able to replace common knowledge, and the combustion engine, nor the need for people such as us to service these "new wave of the future items". This is just my opinion. Interesting disscussion BTW. Jarrell
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    Opel Intern Swiftus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by First opel 1981 View Post
    When I was a kid, a candy bar was 10 cents.
    The same candy bar. today, is $1.19

    When I was a kid, and candy bars were 10 cents, gas was 45 cents per gallon (went as high as 57 cents that summer)
    The same gallon of gas, today, costs about $3.35

    So, how are we getting screwed on gas but not on candy bars?

    (btw, when gas was 29 cents, candy bars were 5 cents)
    I bet much of the price of that candy bar is in its production, which means mostly energy. So, having a pretty direct correlation to energy in pricing makes sense.
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    Opel Intern Swiftus's Avatar
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    Electric cars are here to stay and they will only get more practical and obvious as the new battery technologies come online. Semi-dry electrolytes and aluminum base batteries are going to change your perception of what is possible by the same magnitude the current Teslas managed.

    Those new technologies are worth a 3-5x increase in power density.

    Farms are the perfect place for electric things. Slow, high torque applications are absolutely perfect.
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    Can Opeler Knorm65's Avatar
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    Friday rant

    Quote Originally Posted by Swiftus View Post
    Electric cars are here to stay and they will only get more practical and obvious as the new battery technologies come online. Semi-dry electrolytes and aluminum base batteries are going to change your perception of what is possible by the same magnitude the current Teslas managed.

    Those new technologies are worth a 3-5x increase in power density.

    Farms are the perfect place for electric things. Slow, high torque applications are absolutely perfect.
    It wouldn’t work on our tractors with current tech. We go through 150 gallons of diesel a day in some of our larger tractors like our John Deere 9000 series. There’s just no way anything electric short of a tiny onboard nuclear reactor can power that (not going to happen lol). We also rarely have access to electricity on the tractors.

    On a similar note. I will fully support widespread adoption of electric over fossil fuels when nuclear power becomes the number one source of energy in the US. Until then I just don’t see it. France is all set for electric everything, but the US is far behind.
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    Quote Originally Posted by P.J. Romano View Post
    <snip>
    Valve lifter failure on the way to Carlisle made me think further: Modern oil products are so against our old cars.
    <snip>
    What happened with the valve lifter failure?
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  14. #12
    2000 Post Club soybean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swiftus View Post
    Electric cars are here to stay and they will only get more practical and obvious as the new battery technologies come online. Semi-dry electrolytes and aluminum base batteries are going to change your perception of what is possible by the same magnitude the current Teslas managed.

    Those new technologies are worth a 3-5x increase in power density.

    Farms are the perfect place for electric things. Slow, high torque applications are absolutely perfect.
    I did not read your post Kyler before I posted mine. You are spot on. You being in the Midwest see it more than us on the East Coast, you have "Good Dirt" ours is passable, but a lot of red Clay.

    My response
    But the Price tag is Outrageous. Most of "us" are just "making it" My neighbor who farms some of my land has a 30,000.00/week labor bill. Then add, Fertilizer, fuel, tractor expenses, don't forget your labor, time spent, etc. It's just not going to work, Here, maybe somewhere else. Look at the news, Farmers are hurting due to the trade embargos that are being imposed. I really don't want to go down this road, because it blisters my butt, and I am not going to bring any politics onto this board. Thanks Jarrell
    Last edited by soybean; 05-25-2019 at 05:55 AM. Reason: Didn't read previous Post
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    2000 Post Club soybean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindsay View Post
    What happened with the valve lifter failure?
    It got lost in the conversation. Jarrell
    You lose your dreams, you lose your mind. (The Rolling Stones)
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    3000 Post Club Site Supporter P.J. Romano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindsay View Post
    What happened with the valve lifter failure?
    Hydraulic valve lifter on the cyl. #1 failed on the way to Carlisle a week ago. After seing the pictures, RB said the lifter wore-thru the hardness. I am adding ZDDP to the engine oil but obviously it did not prevent it. Lifter made approx. 20,000 miles from new. It is puzzling that there was no warning, no gradual increase of rattle, it was sudden destruction of the lifter, forcing me to tow the car back home. All other lifters are fine but I am replacing them all.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    So, I guess the rocker wore a hole in the lifter cap? Everything would be okay until it broke through to the inside of the cap and then, like a popped balloon, all the oil inside the lifter would just squirt out, thereby totally disabling the dampening effect of the oil SLOWLY getting squeezed in and out of the lifter. I am surprised also that you didn't detect a tap sound just before failure. However, if the cap wore fairly evenly until it got to the point that the spring inside was able to punch through, then the rocker would be pressing on the jagged, torn up, lifter cap and maybe even the spring itself sticking out the hole. I could imagine things going to heck in a pretty short time.

    Did you actually pull your valve cover on the side of the road?

    Did you do anything to disable that rocker/lifter, like remove them?

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    3000 Post Club Site Supporter P.J. Romano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Scifi Guy View Post
    So, I guess the rocker wore a hole in the lifter cap? Everything would be okay until it broke through to the inside of the cap and then, like a popped balloon, all the oil inside the lifter would just squirt out, thereby totally disabling the dampening effect of the oil SLOWLY getting squeezed in and out of the lifter. I am surprised also that you didn't detect a tap sound just before failure. However, if the cap wore fairly evenly until it got to the point that the spring inside was able to punch through, then the rocker would be pressing on the jagged, torn up, lifter cap and maybe even the spring itself sticking out the hole. I could imagine things going to heck in a pretty short time.

    Did you actually pull your valve cover on the side of the road?

    Did you do anything to disable that rocker/lifter, like remove them?

    The lifter got worn at the bottom, nothing to do with the rocker. The cam lobe got slightly damaged as well. I ordered replacement X1 cam from Enem, Sweden. They gave me significant discount and deducted VAT (tax), so the price including shipping to Canada came to $360. Not too bad.
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    Member Michael A. Smith's Avatar
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    First of all, with respect to point #2, it was not the oil industry's idea to add corn likker to gasoline. That was somebody's else's idea, based on the concept of green energy. Maybe so, maybe no, but the fact remains that, for green energy to produce positive results, the entire process from farm to tailpipe has to be state-of-the-art, which it simply is not and probably will always lag. There will always be some farmer doing it the old-fashioned way, some distillery that requires upgrading, etc.

    Don't worry about what happens to classic cars -- that is a slowly dying business. By and large, people purchase, drive and restore the old cars that they admired and lusted for in their youth. This is why people my age (72) go for the late '60s and early '70s muscle cars, starting with Corvettes, GTOs, Mustangs, Barracudas, and that sort of thing. In my college years, I drove a Triumph Spitfire that I traded in for a 1970 Opel GT when I graduated. Today, I have a Spitfire and a GT in my garage, along with a Cobra kit car. Trouble is, people of my generation are dying off, losing interest, or can't find their glasses. There have been reports lately of a general slow decline in prices for cars of this era, as there has also been for cars from the 1950s.

    At the car shows, do you see any iron from the late 1970s or 1980s? Rarely except for really special vehicles (Ferrari etc.), and for good reason. Detroit's answer to the oil crisis of the '70s was to make truly uninteresting cars. Further, cars, especially today's vehicles, are all built as a collection of modular systems. We jokingly complain about the GT's clock and there recently there was an item on this board about repairing it. But if any instrument on my BMW goes bad fifty years from now, where will the restoration shop get a replacement instrument panel? Every day driving down the highway we see trucks dragging two and three cars off to the crusher with what appears to be minor damage -- they've been totaled by the insurance companies.

    The Wall Street Journal reported recently that the percentage of high school and college students with drivers licenses has dropped significantly in the past thirty years. No longer is it so important to have a license, especially with Uber and Lyft out there. That is an audience that does not care now about the cars they are not driving and they will never care. The classic car business my never fully die, but it is most certainly not a growth industry.
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    4,000 Post Club norbertone.gt371's Avatar
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    Looks like normal for Ajusa aftermarket lifter.The Bottom Plate is to weak.First they stuck in rotate and the cam digged a hole in the bottom.Allways the same crap.
    I have pictures what show exactly the same damage as your picture.Can`t find it at time.

    I hear the new series should be work better now
    I think there is still a lot of crap on the marktet!
    But for me,I would take overhaulet originals with correct ball bottom plate design!

    https://www.ebay.de/itm/Hydrostosel-...AAAOSw44BYTqpe
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    Quote Originally Posted by P.J. Romano View Post
    Hydraulic valve lifter on the cyl. #1 failed on the way to Carlisle a week ago. After seing the pictures, RB said the lifter wore-thru the hardness. I am adding ZDDP to the engine oil but obviously it did not prevent it. Lifter made approx. 20,000 miles from new. It is puzzling that there was no warning, no gradual increase of rattle, it was sudden destruction of the lifter, forcing me to tow the car back home. All other lifters are fine but I am replacing them all.
    Ajusa lifters ? They have a bad rep over here.
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    3000 Post Club Site Supporter P.J. Romano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commodåren View Post
    Ajusa lifters ? They have a bad rep over here.
    How do you identify them?
    Old racers never die. They just go bench racing.
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