Help No Power... Now she's alive again ! - Page 2
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Thread: Help No Power... Now she's alive again !

  1. #21
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    She's alive. Jumpered 1 and 2. Now to figure out the root of the issue. New regulator on the way from OGTS.

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  3. #22
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    OK. Shes running. Changes are a new regulator from OGTS. Jumper wire across terminal 1 and 2. Noticed on the runup that the AMP idiot light does no illuminate when the key is first turned on. No dash lights when headlamp turned on an dash lights switched on and turned up. AMP gauge does drop when lights turned on. Emergency flashers work. Otherwise the amp gauge stays at zero, never goes to the plus side. Running nice and smooth except wont idle have to keep revs up above 1000 to keep her going. (Carb adjustment/timing?) Jumper wire did not get warm, ran it for 10 minutes. I have a new fuse terminal block from OGTS however until I make sure there are no lingering electrical issues I wont install it. Where do I go from here??

  4. #23
    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    Check your battery voltage with the engine off, then start the car and do it again. You should read about 12.5V engine off and 13.5v or higher with the engine running. If you don't, you're not charging. If your battery reads below 12V it either needs to be trickle charged or it's toast. Sometimes you can charge a bad battery and it will say 12.5, but when you check it the next day it's below 12V. It's not holding charge.

    In my not very humble opinion, Opels are battery killers. Every GT I've ever had(five) ate batteries like a teenager munching fries at MacDonald's. I'm so paranoid that I hook up a charger the first thing after I get out of the car.
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  6. #24
    1000 Post Club kwschumm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Scifi Guy View Post
    Check your battery voltage with the engine off, then start the car and do it again. You should read about 12.5V engine off and 13.5v or higher with the engine running. If you don't, you're not charging. If your battery reads below 12V it either needs to be trickle charged or it's toast. Sometimes you can charge a bad battery and it will say 12.5, but when you check it the next day it's below 12V. It's not holding charge.

    In my not very humble opinion, Opels are battery killers. Every GT I've ever had(five) ate batteries like a teenager munching fries at MacDonald's. I'm so paranoid that I hook up a charger the first thing after I get out of the car.
    I never had a battery life problem, but then the only electrical modification I ever made was new speakers.
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  7. #25
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    Car is 12.64 off. 12.51 running. At the battery terminals.
    Last edited by Colorado Kidd; 3 Weeks Ago at 01:32 PM.

  8. #26
    Opel Key Master opelspyder's Avatar
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    You are not charging then. There is a fusible link at the voltage regulator that goes right to that ammeter light. If the bulb is bad it will not charge either. You can disconnect the voltage regulator harness, and trace where the blue/white wire connects to a short fusible link onto the voltage regulator harness. Jump this terminal to ground, and turn key to on position only to see if the ammeter light comes on. If not, there are two possible scenarios. You have a bad ammeter idiot light bulb. Or you do not have power from the black and red wire from the fuse block connection. That would possibly explain dash lights, but the gauges get their power from this wire too, so I don’t know.
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  9. #27
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    I'll check it out in the AM. Quick question. Is there a reason they use fuseable link wire as opposed to an in line fuse? Seems like an inline fuse would be easier to trouble shoot and replace a fuse if needed.

  10. #28
    Opel Key Master opelspyder's Avatar
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    You have three, they will burn where a fuse pops, you would usually require heavy duty fuses for these. 1 on starter, 1 on alternator. One on voltage regulator. Now I don’t necessarily think you need the one on the voltage regulator, I believe they used that one because it powered the heated rear window
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  11. #29
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    OK I jumped the fuseable link to ground and the amp light comes on with the key. I'm assuming the fuseable link wire is blown even though the fuseable link wire looks completely fine. I'll have to get some fuseable link wire to replace it. Correct?

  12. #30
    1000 Post Club Vincent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colorado Kidd View Post
    Car is 12.64 off. 12.51 running. At the battery terminals.
    As already mentioned by Spyder, you are definitely not charging at 12.5 v running.
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  13. #31
    Opel Key Master opelspyder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colorado Kidd View Post
    OK I jumped the fuseable link to ground and the amp light comes on with the key. I'm assuming the fuseable link wire is blown even though the fuseable link wire looks completely fine. I'll have to get some fuseable link wire to replace it. Correct?
    One of two things, get a new alternator to regulator harness from Gil and it will come with a fusible link, buy a new one from auto parts store and splice it in. I like the Mantas style where you can connect that harness with a terminal connection. It is how I am going to wire all mine from now on.
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  14. #32
    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    It seems that you're well on your way to fixing your problem and you're learning stuff along the way.



    Once you have this conquered, keep in mind that fuses blow and wires burn out for a reason and that reason is usually shorting out to ground, which can happen in a variety of ways. Sometimes a device can just go wonky internally and cause a short circuit. Replace it and problem solved. But 99% of the time it's a loose wire, or you f'd up doing a repair, etc.

    Try to find the culprit, unless you already have, otherwise you'll be constantly afraid that the problem will occur again.

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  15. #33
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    Thanks Gordon. I agree. There is something causing it that I have not found yet.

    So far I have replaced the regulator with a new one from OGTS.

    Jumered terminal 1 and 2 and ran car several times monitoring wire temps and looking for additional occurrence of arcing. None so far.

    On deck replacing fuse terminal block. I would like to find the root issue before replacement.

    Causal to initial problem unknown. So far no re occurrence. Continuing to search for the issue.

    Next step get some fuseable link wire to replace blown one. (and some spares)

    I'm not driving this thing other than around the block until I'm confident there is no issue. Last thing I want is to burn this beautiful car up or be stranded somewhere.
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  16. #34
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    So I go to Advanced Auto to get 18 gauge fuseable link wire. I ask the dude at the counter. He runs around for 25 minutes checks with the 2 other employees comes back and says they only have 14 gauge but they can order some for me. I look at him an think (well I can order it myself from amazon moron) I say no thanks I'll order it myself.

    Then I call O'rellys and ask if they have any. The guy goes and check. Comes back and says we have some but he doesn't know what gauge becase it doesn't say anything on the package.
    Do I even bother with Auto Zone? They don't even speak English there?

    I try to order from RockAuto. When I get to the end of the online check out it fails and says Cannot complete because they have to collect tax for my location (not state but city or county and they have no way to do that)

    Screw it I ordered it from Amazon.

    And they wonder why they cant survive.
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  17. #35
    Opel Rallier since 1977
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    The fuse blocks are suspect on a lot of older cars. Heating will loosen the staked connections, tarnish and corrosion builds up, that heats, and that heating creates a vicious cycle of deterioration. Same things happans to the stab-on connectors and their crimping to the wires. Sooner or later something heats critically and wires break, and spark, etc. Suonds like what happened to you fuseblock.

    Our 1900 has a couple of inline fuses beside the fuse block, becasue some of the riveted fuse terminals got hot and just fell apart and the PO patched in around them.

    BTW, fusible link wire is normally soldered in place, not crimped. Fusible link wire normally runs with a bit of an elevated temperature and that heat may create an unreliable situation with crimped connections, just like the fuse block and stab-on connection heating issues mentioned above. So if you don't have a soldering iron and skills and are tooled up for crimping, then an inline fuse is a better option IMHO.

    And, when you jumped the fusible link wire to ground and the generator light came on, did you jump that wire to ground at the regulator connection? If so, then the fusible link is good.
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  18. #36
    Opel Key Master opelspyder's Avatar
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    Factory crimped all fusible link connections with a splice. Soldering causes wires to become brittle, and in any motorsport wiring, they recommend not to solder, but properly crimp.
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  19. #37
    1000 Post Club kwschumm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opelspyder View Post
    Factory crimped all fusible link connections with a splice. Soldering causes wires to become brittle, and in any motorsport wiring, they recommend not to solder, but properly crimp.
    I've heard this is also true in aircraft.
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  20. #38
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manta Rallier View Post
    The fuse blocks are suspect on a lot of older cars. Heating will loosen the staked connections, tarnish and corrosion builds up, that heats, and that heating creates a vicious cycle of deterioration. Same things happans to the stab-on connectors and their crimping to the wires. Sooner or later something heats critically and wires break, and spark, etc. Suonds like what happened to you fuseblock.

    Our 1900 has a couple of inline fuses beside the fuse block, becasue some of the riveted fuse terminals got hot and just fell apart and the PO patched in around them.

    BTW, fusible link wire is normally soldered in place, not crimped. Fusible link wire normally runs with a bit of an elevated temperature and that heat may create an unreliable situation with crimped connections, just like the fuse block and stab-on connection heating issues mentioned above. So if you don't have a soldering iron and skills and are tooled up for crimping, then an inline fuse is a better option IMHO.

    And, when you jumped the fusible link wire to ground and the generator light came on, did you jump that wire to ground at the regulator connection? If so, then the fusible link is good.
    Yes I jumpered from the regulator plug to ground. That makes sense that the fuseable link is good. Now what?

  21. #39
    Just Some Dude in Jersey The Scifi Guy's Avatar
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    I did my car up with an aftermarket fuse box and there was no mention of fusible links. Everything goes to a fuse in the fuse box. I see no reason to retain the fusible link concept and it seems quite reasonable to simply use a fuse. There are situations on the machines I work on at work where they sometimes draw excessively high current for a few seconds or microseconds at start up, and in those situations they utilize "slow blow" fuses or "self resetting circuit breakers". Slow blow fuses have a time delay before they blow, so if you only draw excessive current for a very short time, they won't blow. I actually looked into self resetting circuit breakers for a specific mod and problem on my car. I have "door poppers", which are automatic door unlatchers that you operate with a remote for guys who like to "shave" their door handles. The previous owner of my car got rid of the door handles, so I HAD to install a door popper kit. A solenoid yanks on the door latch and pops the door open when I press a button on a remote.

    The problem was that the remote is on my key fob and if I have my keys in my pocket and sit down the button can get pushed constantly. This sends a non-stop signal to the door popper and keeps the solenoid energized and pulling on the door latch non-stop. Eventually the current heats things up and the fuse in the car would blow. Schitt, now I can't get in my car! So I installed a self resetting circuit breaker gizmo, so that now if that button gets pushed non-stop and heats things up, the circuit breaker trips, but when it cools off it resets and I'm back in business.

    Massive overkill for your situation, I just thought I'd mention it as a topic of interest.

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  22. #40
    Opeler Colorado Kidd's Avatar
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    I think I found part of the problem. On the connector to the regulator the terminal with the fuseable link and white wire does not lock into the connector and is loose. Looks like it was possibly creating an intermittent connect at best to the regulator. Do you think this could cause issues?
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