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Thread: Overheating solutions

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr DJ-GT View Post
    Thank you, but I’m doing this all from my cell phone that’s nowhere close to windows 10... I don’t need another gas cooler with what I’ve already done to (Baby), & the Southern California climate is pretty even keel, so half the time I don’t know what season it is... But thanks for sharing the resources here, because maybe I can find a (carburetor air horn) for my modified Weber DGAS to increase its air intake flow... I see pictures & videos on YouTube but no one ever days where one can be found, & I understand they specifically make one just for Webers...
    https://www.piercemanifolds.com/product_p/52848.015.htm

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  3. #42
    Opeler Mr DJ-GT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrcollinsjr View Post
    Here is a link to an old and brief thread I started on Evan's Coolant years ago. I like the idea but don't like the idea of what happens if you're on the road somewhere and need coolant.

    Harold
    Before I go to a recommended website, I’d like to know a little more about your antifreeze first, because I’ll have to switch to a firewalled phone to go there... it’s a little bit of a hassle, but so is getting your phone hacked, It took a whole month to kick the last intruders out... Can you please tell me more about your special antifreeze here, for the Opel family to share? Thank you

  4. #43
    Tennessean Site Supporter hrcollinsjr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr DJ-GT View Post
    Before I go to a recommended website, I’d like to know a little more about your antifreeze first, because I’ll have to switch to a firewalled phone to go there... it’s a little bit of a hassle, but so is getting your phone hacked, It took a whole month to kick the last intruders out... Can you please tell me more about your special antifreeze here, for the Opel family to share? Thank you
    The link I included is a shortcut to a discussion I started on this forum years ago. You can Google "Evans Coolant" for yourself, they are a legit company and it should be safe. As far as using Evans, I considered it but didn't like some of the drawbacks. One being that the system needed to be PURE Evans, no water! Which is hard to do unless you're building a fresh engine. Our cars get driven. I discovered a failing water pump several years ago the morning we where to leave for the Carlisle show. I picked up a water pump along the way and changed it in Pennsylvania. The car was trailered there but it was driven for several days while my truck was being worked on. Sometimes when it rains it pours.

    Harold

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  6. #44
    Tennessean Site Supporter hrcollinsjr's Avatar
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    Cheaper from Pierce Manifolds but there are more details from the "manufacturer" in Chattanooga, TN.

    Weber DGV Air horn

    Harold

    P.S. This part should probably be in another thread to make it less confusing and easier to find for others seeking something similar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr DJ-GT View Post
    Thank you, but I’m doing this all from my cell phone that’s nowhere close to windows 10... I don’t need another gas cooler with what I’ve already done to (Baby), & the Southern California climate is pretty even keel, so half the time I don’t know what season it is... But thanks for sharing the resources here, because maybe I can find a (carburetor air horn) for my modified Weber DGAS to increase its air intake flow... I see pictures & videos on YouTube but no one ever days where one can be found, & I understand they specifically make one just for Webers...
    Although many people on the forum resize their pics, it is NOT necessary. From what I have read, it may have been required when the forum first started up, but (if you are not a 10 megapixel type of photographer) the system will fit you pics to thumbnail size automatically. If you are on a computer, hovering your mouse over the picture will show some info including what size is being shown. If you want more detail, click on the pic and it will open in a new window at 100% size (if the screen allows that size). As for phones, I learned (not too well) that you should not put them in your pants pocket with bolts & nuts, then bend over to work on your car. Trust me on this, I have 2 examples of proof!

    JM2CW -- Doug

    PS - Is anyone else here running a NEW STYLE radiator with a single row? The radiator is the same thickness as a normal single row (things fit a lot easier that way) but the cooling tubes are about 1-1/2 inches wide (front to rear) with the "normal" thickness. More coolant flow area, more coolant surface area, improved air flow (less blockage) and a couple more benefits I can't remember right now! My 1952 MGTD 1250cc motor was replaced with a 2300cc Ford and the old radiator would not handle the load. The Fan Man in So Cal put together a custom made ($$$) new style and all my problems went away (using the same electric pull through fan I was using before). Maybe someone would be interested: https://the-fan-man.com/ ..

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrcollinsjr View Post
    P.S. 100% antifreeze freezes at 12° above zero, IIRC!
    That is only true for ethylene glycol base. Propylene glycol, the base for Evan's coolant, freezes at -74F !!

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    Tennessean Site Supporter hrcollinsjr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manta Rallier View Post
    That is only true for ethylene glycol base. Propylene glycol, the base for Evan's coolant, freezes at -74F !!
    Since Evans is supposed to be run pure, I'd hope it would have a lower freezing point than traditional antifreeze.

    Harold

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    Quote Originally Posted by soybean View Post
    True, no offense to Gil, but I believe Bob has built more engines. Plus, I don't overheat as much anymore. I'm not crediting this one thing to helping, but a combination of 7 bladed fan, correct antifreeze, sprint powder- coated, and pusher fan, gas cooler, have helped me immensely with overheating and carb boil over. Just my thoughts on this. Jarrell
    It is perplexing when you're faced with 180° opposite opinions from Opelers that know so much more than I ever could hope for
    Last edited by hrcollinsjr; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:59 PM.
    Bob

  11. #49
    Tennessean Site Supporter hrcollinsjr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opelgt722002 View Post
    It is perplexing when you're faced with 180° opposite opinions from Opelers that know so much more than I ever could hope for
    On top of that, when this was first brought up I believe someone mentioned that some of the available head gaskets came with holes already in the recommended locations.

    Harold

  12. #50
    Über Genius First opel 1981's Avatar
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    Humidity shouldn't be a factor in engine cooling. Humidity only matters as an evaporative effect. If the cooling system were a swamp cooler then the humidity would play out but in a sealed system it's all about airflow.

    Having said that, an electric fan that pushes (or better, PULLS) more air across the radiator (with all the tubes in the flow) than a stock fan would will be better than a stock fan. Also, an electric fan will almost always outperform the stock fan at idle.
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  13. #51
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    I've done a lot of thinking and researching on overheating problems, because I want to avoid them when I rebuild my GT. To avoid vapor lock which is often a sign that you have some problems with heat, many just install an electric fuel pump. Problem solved. Turn the ignition to run, wait a few seconds and then start the car. To combat cooling temps, install an electric radiator fan that is connected to a temp switch in the bottom of a new radiator built for the GT. Maybe install a slightly lower 'stat. But what if you are opposed to electrification? Then these easy solutions can't help and that is where my research began. With the internet, we have the ability to find solutions to really old problems that are out there somewhere online thanks to the collective knowledge of untold millions of people. There is no reason why you should have to install an electric fan and electric fuel pump to combat this, that's just the easy way to fix it.

    I'm sorry in advance if it seems like I'm over-explaining anything, I wrote this for anyone interested in these problems but could be new to the car scene.

    -Vapor Lock-
    When using a mechanical fuel pump, it's important to understand how they work. Most mechanical fuel pumps are driven by a cam or an eccentric timing gear that pushes up on a rod or down on a lever, going through the pump to push on a spring loaded diaphragm. As this diaphragm moves up and down, it creates suction to pull fuel into a bowl which will wind up pushed out into the fuel line. The CIH's mechanical fuel pump is a cam (mounted at the base of the distributor shaft) and rod configuration. The fuel supplied by a mechanical fuel pump will pulsate as a result of how the pump works, meaning there will be a constant change in fuel pressure. It's never desirable to have variations in pressure within the fuel line supplying a carb or injector. On a carburated engine, it can be ignored but there are drawbacks to doing that. Pulsating fuel makes it easier for an air pocket to form and cause vapor lock. It can also mess with the tune on the carb, especially a Weber because Webers need a stable float bowl to mix air and fuel correctly. Because mechanical fuel pumps are also dependent on engine RPM, the fuel pressure can vary a lot which isn't a problem with electric fuel pumps. To solve this, a fuel pressure regulator can be placed somewhere between the fuel pump and the carb to keep the fuel going to the carb at a constant pressure once a set limit is reached. Most GT's run a Weber DGV which only needs at maximum, 4 psi of fuel pressure. Opel did not put fuel pressure regulators on the GT. A long time ago, and Italian company called Malpassi made regulators intended for use with Webers. There are two types of Malpassi regulators, the petrol king and the filter king. The petrol king is just a regulator and the filter king has either a fiber or SS mesh replaceable filter housed in either a glass, plastic, or metal bowl below the regulator. You can see a Malpassi filter king in the engine bay of the Conrero GT, by the way. Of course there are many fuel pressure regulators on the market that could be used, but I'm preferential to the Malpassi units for this application. I don't want a modern, billet aluminum regulator under the hood or a cheap regulator made out of pressed metal. I believe not having a regulator on a GT running a mechanical fuel pump is one of the causes for vapor lock. If you run a Cater rotary electric fuel pump, a regulator is not needed and they will supply a high volume of fuel (60-70 GPH) at 4 PSI consistently, as a FYI. I'm sticking to a mechanical pump however, so I will need a regulator.

    The other main reason for vapor lock is too much heat being absorbed by the fuel, either in the fuel line or the float bowl. Unless you live in a pretty cold climate where you need to keep the fuel heated to help atomize the fuel, having a fuel line hug the engine is a bad idea. So much of the CIH was designed on this principal, heating the fuel to help atomize it. Why the hell else would you have the intake and the exhaust right next to each other on the same side of a piston engine? Higher intake air temps doesn't help you produce power but the smaller the fuel droplets are, the easier it burns and more likely to stay suspended in the air. The hotter a liquid or gas is, the faster the particles move and typically the smaller the molecules are, which translates into better combustion. Having petrol enter an engine as a super fine mist with plenty of cold air with multiple ignition points is ideal but hard to pull off. This is why forced induction and direct injection are amazing and why companies are researching laser ignition. If the fuel gets too hot though, vapor lock and auto-ignition (detonation) can become a problem. In a warm climate, I don't believe we need to intentionally heat up the fuel to help with atomization and instead should try to keep it cool until it reaches the carb. So, rerouting the fuel line away from the engine would be a good idea. In the attached picture, you can see the general idea I have for this - blue is hardline and green is hose. The radiator support has an indented path that I think would work great for a hard fuel line. It would likely benefit from the cool air building up in front of the radiator and pushing through small gaps around the radiator. Combined with a regulator, this should prevent vapor lock from happening in the fuel line.

    Similar to vapor lock is fuel evaporating from the float bowl in the carb, which can make a hot start difficult. To combat this, Opel used a heat shield. My thoughts are to install a tri-Y header (tri-Y or 4-2-1 headers tend to be the best for performance) and have the header, intake, and exterior of the carb ceramic coated. Reducing ambient temps in the engine bay as a result of the exhaust header or manifold is the best way to decrease problems related to heat and nothing really beats a good ceramic coating for this. Some people use header wraps but these can trap moisture when it rains or if you go through a car wash, which will eventually cause rust even on SS. Heat shields are still useful but they can mess with the appearance of the engine if that is something you're worried about. If you want to show off the intake and headers, then a heat shield under the carb would clash with this. A phenolic spacer can help keep a hot intake from heating up the base of the carb to an extent, the material is also used to create intake spacers which I haven't seen done for the Opel community. I think ceramic coating the headers, intake and carb would do a really good job at preventing fuel evaporating and bring down ambient temps, if nothing else was tried. Ceramic coatings should also help keep the engine from overheating.

    -Engine Overheating-
    Engine Masters once did a fan test (which used to be on YouTube until Motortrend started a streaming platform) that was really interesting. The goal was to see how much water pump driven fans can rob an engine of power, but they tested with and without a fan shroud as part of this. When they did the fan shroud test, it showed that it cost the engine more power if a fan shroud was used (obviously). This is due to improved aerodynamics of the fan, which increased the drag created by the fan. To overcome the drag, more HP is needed. So, fan shrouds help improve the effectiveness of any cooling fan. I've seen a lot of GT's that don't have the fan shroud anymore. Mine still has it but it's damaged and will need to be replaced. A new and better radiator designed for the GT and a fan shroud, maybe a lower temp 'stat should be enough to handle the cooling needs. I already have a NOS Opel 5 blade fan to be used with a fan clutch and OGTS has a 7 blade if I need more fan, along with the necessary fan clutch.

    A bigger issue, as already discussed a bit in this thread, is coolant. Evans coolant was created to be a better coolant but it has one drawback, emergencies. You can only put Evans coolant in, it will have a chemical reaction to water you don't want. So unless you plan to carry a jug of Evans with you on a road trip, a more traditional coolant is a better idea. Below are charts that shows how much heat can be absorbed by the coolant depending on how much antifreeze is in the mix and the freezing point of that mix. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol are similar in how they perform until you reach roughly 60% antifreeze in your coolant. Looking at the graphs below, it's somewhat easy to understand why a 50/50 mix is so common. You get roughly 85% of the heat capacity for water while bringing down the freezing point from 32°F (0°C) to about -30°F (-30°C). I'd say you will want at least 40% antifreeze in your coolant unless you live in Miami or similarly stupid hot around the year location. Annually checking the condition of your coolant should prevent it from reaching a point where it no longer does an effective job, much like the brake fluid needing to be checked and replaced when too acidic.



    BKE Racing. engine coolant

    One of the cars I've done a lot of research on is the 2005/06 Ford GT. It's cool to read up on how the car was built. When doing anything with the coolant or intercooler systems on that car, you have to purge the system of air via vacuum when you're done. You can buy kits fairly cheaply to connect a vacuum hose to a temporary radiator cap. Turn on whatever machine you have to draw a vacuum and any air in the coolant is removed. If you really want to make sure there isn't any air in the coolant, that would be a good way to do it. If you top off the coolant after that, you're done. The pressure setting of the radiator cap will automatically compensate for excessive coolant pressure and excess coolant will run out. I wouldn't rely on a radiator cap to purge air from the system because air pockets can get trapped in the engine.
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    Last edited by Autoholic; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:43 PM.
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  14. #52
    Tennessean Site Supporter hrcollinsjr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Autoholic View Post
    When doing anything with the coolant or intercooler systems on that car, you have to purge the system of air via vacuum when you're done. You can buy kits fairly cheaply to connect a vacuum hose to a temporary radiator cap. Turn on whatever machine you have to draw a vacuum and any air in the coolant is removed. If you really want to make sure there isn't any air in the coolant, that would be a good way to do it. If you top off the coolant after that, you're done. The pressure setting of the radiator cap will automatically compensate for excessive coolant pressure and excess coolant will run out. I wouldn't rely on a radiator cap to purge air from the system because air pockets can get trapped in the engine.
    Funny you should mention this. I had to replace the water pumps on two second gen Dodge pickups. The heater was never as good and water could be heard gurgling in the heater cores. I finally had someone pull a vacuum on the system before adding coolant. It stopped the gurgling noise. Some of todays cars have the radiators mounted so low that once air gets in the system extra measures have to be taken to purge the system of air, causing overheating in some cases if it isn't done.

    Harold
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrcollinsjr View Post
    Funny you should mention this. I had to replace the water pumps on two second gen Dodge pickups. The heater was never as good and water could be heard gurgling in the heater cores. I finally had someone pull a vacuum on the system before adding coolant. It stopped the gurgling noise. Some of todays cars have the radiators mounted so low that once air gets in the system extra measures have to be taken to purge the system of air, causing overheating in some cases if it isn't done.

    Harold
    This brings up another thing to consider. When you're replacing the coolant, the heater control valve needs to be open. Running the engine for a bit, then hook up a vacuum system to remove air, run the engine again, then do a vacuum purge again. Repeat until you're satisfied. It would be easy to forget the heater core or to flush the system a couple times with regular water beforehand.

    Quote Originally Posted by First opel 1981 View Post
    Humidity shouldn't be a factor in engine cooling. Humidity only matters as an evaporative effect. If the cooling system were a swamp cooler then the humidity would play out but in a sealed system it's all about airflow. .
    Humidity does impact the effectiveness of the cooling system. When it's very humid, the air is saturated with water and so it will have a different specific heat capacity than dry air. The specific heat capacity of 80%+ humid air is about twice as high as air with a low humidity. So, a humid climate will help your cooling system work better and the flip side, a dry climate won't be as helpful. This all translates into how effective a radiator will be. You shouldn't notice this if your cooling system is suited to the cooling demands of your vehicle for typical environments, however. If your cooling system struggles when the humidity is low, then your cooling system has some problems that need fixing. These problems would also show up in a lot of stop and go traffic on a normal Spring day or really hot summer day regardless of traffic.
    Last edited by Autoholic; 4 Weeks Ago at 09:07 PM.
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    Senior Member The Cub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by soybean View Post
    Well, I believe I have a new one on ya'll. I actually have a bleeder valve on top of my thermostat housing that is used to get the air out. I can post pics in the Am. Another trick that Rallye Bob told me when I rebuilt my engine was to take the old head gasket lay it on the new one. Find the coolant holes that were never opened on nos 2 and nos 3 cyl, they will show up on the old gasket. Punch them out on the new gasket for improved coolant flow. Opel left those 2 from the block closed for some reason. Hth, Jarrell
    I like the idea of the bleeder valve on top of the t-stat housing 🙂 a pic would be a great. It it a manual valve or a loose metal type ball that drops when air is present and seals back up with the rise of the water level? In our HVAC industry it’s commonly known as a “Hoffman” valve used to bleed air from the large water loop systems it automatically insures there’s no air in the pressured water system, ideally it’s located at the highest location in the building but not always the case. Well, you get the idea. A mini one would be great tapped into the t-stat housing. I certainly have or had no idea that they even make one.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Cub View Post
    I like the idea of the bleeder valve on top of the t-stat housing 🙂 a pic would be a great. It it a manual valve or a loose metal type ball that drops when air is present and seals back up with the rise of the water level? In our HVAC industry it’s commonly known as a “Hoffman” valve used to bleed air from the large water loop systems it automatically insures there’s no air in the pressured water system, ideally it’s located at the highest location in the building but not always the case. Well, you get the idea. A mini one would be great tapped into the t-stat housing. I certainly have or had no idea that they even make one.
    See my post (nos 6) on the first page. You'll see the bleeder valve, (manual) and my fuel cooler. Also have the Stant cap next post and an overflow tank by Summit Hth, Jarrell
    Last edited by soybean; 4 Weeks Ago at 09:47 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr DJ-GT View Post
    Pardon my ignorance, but i’ve worked on my cars alone for decades, so there’s a lot of Opel shoptalk lingo I’m not familiar with... When you say “chimney set up” I’m not sure if you’re referring to the intake or exhaust system, because the intake is on top like a chimney, but technically a chimney is an exhaust system. So if you’re referring to that cast-iron stock exhaust manifold I thoroughly agree with you in that it should be replaced with high-performance headers for a dramatic difference in performance, & even cooling, & you could have any muffler shop expand your pipes to 2 inches all the way back, or call Gil for a complete header & 2” custom exhaust system going all the way back to the exhaust tip of the custom remanufactured resonator... Please be advised, i’m not pro molding a single source for everything, but every source that I’ve used for the best quality products, & in 30 years I’ve been to just about every one of them in Southern California... Ive always open a new ones & new ideas... No one place is the (one stop for everything) despite any claims to the contrary... Even if I miss speak...
    So meanwhile, back at the ranch,,, what’s a chimney? :}
    More commonly referred on this site as a stove exhaust/intake combo, I just removed it this weekend in favor of the Sprint exhaust manifold. Next step is to add some heat shielding then install the temperature controlled electric radiator fan. I took this picture of it as it was sitting there it looked more like a chimney so my apologies for any confusion. 2” exhaust is all in place but I don’t like the routing or the 16 gauge, it works for now but I think 13 gauge will be quieter and hopefully carry the heat to the rear better. I like to run on the lean side but not too lean and I like quiet, so what am I doing owning an Opel GT? LOL
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  20. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrcollinsjr View Post
    On top of that, when this was first brought up I believe someone mentioned that some of the available head gaskets came with holes already in the recommended locations.

    Harold
    Risse sells a gasket that has the holes cut out as well as one without the holes ( according to a old post from Travis ).
    soybean likes this.
    Bob

  21. #59
    Opeler Mr DJ-GT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr DJ-GT View Post
    I’m just an old school, multi generation Opel fan, & former street mechanic... I’m not a professional one like many of the experts here, however I do know a few time tested engine cooling remedies I’d like to share... If you have any overheating or gas boiling issues the absolute best anti freeze I’ve found unfortunately is the most expensive at about 20 bucks a gallon, but should always be bought full strength so you don’t pay five bucks or more for a half gallon of water when you can use your own... It’s a golden colored elixir engineered especially for hot running engines like Opel blocks & others... It’s called Prestone Dex Cool Extended Life for GM vehicles... That, & you should check your thermostat to make sure it’s not rusted from running too much water in the cooling system because running straight water will usually run hotter & tends to corrode a lot of interior components... Consider the option of a lower temperature thermostat, or in extreme cases of very hot environments (none at all) as a temporary solution to see if that’s your issue... It’ll cause much longer warm-ups & you don’t get that nice regulated temperature throughout the engine, but if you live in a very hot desert, it probably wouldn’t matter as much, as I’ve experienced several desert dwellers doing jus that... The factory heat sheild normally installed at the base of your stock Opel carburetor is a must to prevent gas boiling, along with sleeving any metallic gas line sections near the engine in slightly oversized rubber fuel line hose to insulate it... An (Oil Dam), which is a little round metallic sleeve that snugly fits inside the rear oil return port on your cylinder head keeps the cooling oil level in the head higher & longer is also another inexpensive helper to cool your GT head & increase head lubrication. Although they say the heater hose hook up positions doesn’t really matter, but I prefer my feed line on top & my return on the bottom so the return is gravity fed back more rapidly into the core for a smoother flow, & prevents that gurgling sound due to air in the system that many Opels get, especially when you open the heater valve... A ribbed plastic covered (cool flow) aluminum, pre-carburetor mounted fuel filter is another cheap way to help prevent gas boiling as it cools the gas down and a small reservoir right before it enters the carb, & a little safer in a hot environment than straight plastic filters... A double core, triple core, or new plastic radiators, electric radiator mounted fan setups, or my preferred 7 bladed clutch fans with it’s own water pump setup are a little more expensive sometimes, but are very effective for superior cooling, tho electric fans drain a lot of battery power if you’re running low amp electrical systems... The clutch fan system works with centrifical force & relieves engine stresses at low to high rpms that’s normally caused by resistance of the stock 5 & 6 bladed fans... If you can get an old style Volkswagen oil cooler & flush it out before mounting it to the opposite outer side of the charcoal canister reinforcement bar in the front grill area, & connect it into your cooling system with T, or Y connectors controlled by a heater hose shut off valve on the feed line, will also make a dramatic difference... Combinations of these should make a world of difference in cooling down your Opel engine... <>Dj<>
    Extra engine cooling tip:
    I recently spoke to one of my Opel Tech-Support authorities named Gil, who advised me that another dramatic way of cooling an Opel GT engine is to cut a 1” to 1.5” slit in the shape of a long smile directly across the (lower front) of the carburetor’s teardrop shaped hollow (space bubble) atop the GT’s hood located directly over the carburetor, intake, and exhaust manifolds and/or headers, if ya got em. He stated the tool best suited is a dremel, after making a template from masking tape or something to guid it... He recommend cutting it slightly more narrow than how you want it, then use a fine tooth file to smooth out the edges and get it just right... Then mount a cool looking black or color matching screen/mesh directly over your new freshly cut slit on the interior side of the hood’s carb space bubble to still allow a smooth inflowing stream of cooling air, while simultaneously suppressing excess water surges during lite rains to moderately heavy storms... However,,, for all you daredevils out there... Not Recommended for Wet River Crossings, or Flood Control Use... A’m jus sayin... :{

    Great tip Gil. Thanks again...
    <>Dj<>
    Last edited by Mr DJ-GT; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:41 AM. Reason: Added a bit of levity :}

  22. #60
    Opeler Mr DJ-GT's Avatar
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    I actually tracked down the Super Compaq retro fited airhorns for my Weber DGAS & found it also fits several other Webers with the same design configuration... they cost about 50 bucks each as long as they last so I bought a couple, like I tend to do with all small rare parts...
    Pierce Manifolds p/n 52848.015
    ‪Piercemanifolds.com or phone 408-842-6667‬
    By combining the new air horn with an Edelbrock Pro flow 1000 Chrome breather & a Red Line base adapter for Webers, I feel like I have 10 to 15 more horsepower with noticeably better cooling & gas milage... All of this, yet I haven’t even readjusted my DGAS Carb yet, or popped in some fresh, barely used Bosch platinum plugs I jus found in a box of about a dozen leftovers, from the days when I used to change them about every 2000 or 3000 miles because of an old original, worn out, (factory low compression type) engine I had with leaky rings to boot... That was about two or three engines ago... The plugs already have the tiny holes I drilled in them using one of those tiny little jewelers type bits... Making two tiny holes at the very tip & rear of the ground electrode to increase spark plug efficiency by killing the shadow spots under & behind the L shaped ground... Basically converting them to the old Spitfire type plugs that they didn’t make for Opels... They’re soaking in some Marvel Mystery Oil right now before I clean them up & re-gap them...

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