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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to figure out what bolt pattern my 1.9 has. The car is a '71; However the engine may be a '73-but I'm not sure. The engine leaks, so I am reluctant to remove the valve cover, as this may cause even more. Is there any other way to determine this?
 

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The way to look at it is if you spend say 7.50 for a valve cover gasket. You can both identify what you have and possibly make your leak at least better. Sounds pretty cheap to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
sold

ok, so I've removed the valve cover, and it has 10 star bolts around the perimeter with two star bolts more internal and centrally located. I'm thinking this is a 12-bolt. Am I correct?
 

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That is a 10 bolt head which is correct for your year of car, a 12 has 2 more in the front that bolt to the timing cover.
 

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a way to check the year of engine you have without taking the valve cover off, is to pull the starter off, and there is a casting number behind the starter, 2 numbers will represent the year it was manufactured. i believe the number starts or ends with these numbers, but not positive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also

Thanks for the info. There is 71 then a series of #'s on both the head and block.

What I also noticed as I looked through some of the drain holes, was that the cam was pretty 'corroded' in the middle. Discolored, and pitted. Also there appeared to be carbon building-up on the rearmost valve area. I'm assuming that the head may need some work.

If that's so, when I replace engine gaskets I should prolly have some head work done. What else would y'all suggest? New cam/lifters, rings...?
 

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Keep it running!

Scott,

If the car is still drivable it is sometimes better to hunt down another engine and refurbish that while the car is still usable. Motor jobs can take a while amd nothing is worse than a GT, without an engine :(

If your motor is in dire need of attention then finding a "runner" that can be swaped in for a while is also a good option. My GT is siting there without its heart so I know wherefore of I speak .............
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The engine seems to run just fine. And when the time comes, I have a couple friends with shops who are willing to help me pull the motor, and do the necessary work. So hopefully it wouldn't be out too long.

I think I would at least like to get a rebuilt head (or have a head rebuilt) with a little stronger cam, when I do the gasket changes. What do you think? Then start saving up for more expensive parts for a real rebuild down the road.
 

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The standard cam is quite "strong" with the peak power above 5,000 rpm and capable of spinning to at least 6,000 rpm.

If you "put your foot into it" and go to 6,100 rpm through the gears then 1st gets you to 36mph; 2nd 44mph; 3rd 88mph and 4th 113mph +

A rebuilt head on a used short block does load up tired components .....
The biggest upgrade for the later GT engines is to get hold of some 9:1 CR pistons to replace the 7.6:1 CR ones used in them. This will do more to "perk up" a street engine than almost anything else and is needed to bring out the best in any cam change/carb upgrade/better exhaust.

Remember: "Eveything costs more .. and takes longer!"
 

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GTJIM said:
The standard cam is quite "strong" with the peak power above 5,000 rpm and capable of spinning to at least 6,000 rpm.

If you "put your foot into it" and go to 6,100 rpm through the gears then 1st gets you to 36mph; 2nd 44mph; 3rd 88mph and 4th 113mph +

A rebuilt head on a used short block does load up tired components .....
The biggest upgrade for the later GT engines is to get hold of some 9:1 CR pistons to replace the 7.6:1 CR ones used in them. This will do more to "perk up" a street engine than almost anything else and is needed to bring out the best in any cam change/carb upgrade/better exhaust.

Remember: "Eveything costs more .. and takes longer!"
IMS, stock 4-speed with 3.44 rear end, second gear is ~59MPH.

I roughly calculate speed equate MPH to first 2 RPM digits (ie. RPM/100): 1st ~50%RPM; 2nd ~100%RPM; 3rd ~150%RPM; 4th ~200%RPM. It gets you close with stock tires.
 
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