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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Never saw this one before:

<<< GM Stir-Lec I (1968) An early hybrid electric prototype based on an Opel Kadett Coupé. It used 14 front mounted lead-acid batteries to drive a 3 phase electric induction motor that drove the rear wheels. The battery array was charged by a rear mounted Stirling external combustion engine. >>>

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Vendor
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Wow, really interesting. I never hear of this project before. Almost 30 years before the first Prius! According to Wiki, it actually had a pretty decent range (assuming all battery?) of 150-200 miles but only a top speed of 55 mph. This was around the same time period that GM was fussing around with the electric corvairs
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

"Most technically advanced Stirling engines, like those developed for United States government labs, use helium as the working gas, because it functions close to the efficiency and power density of hydrogen with fewer of the material containment issues. Helium is inert, and hence not flammable. Helium is relatively expensive, and must be supplied as bottled gas. One test showed hydrogen to be 5% (absolute) more efficient than helium (24% relatively) in the GPU-3 Stirling engine.[73] The researcher Allan Organ demonstrated that a well-designed air engine is theoretically just as efficient as a helium or hydrogen engine, but helium and hydrogen engines are several times more powerful per unit volume. "

 

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Unfortunately helium on earth is a finite resource. There’s a lot more on the moon but it’s kind of hard to capture!
 

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Vendor
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"Most technically advanced Stirling engines, like those developed for United States government labs, use helium as the working gas, because it functions close to the efficiency and power density of hydrogen with fewer of the material containment issues. Helium is inert, and hence not flammable. Helium is relatively expensive, and must be supplied as bottled gas. One test showed hydrogen to be 5% (absolute) more efficient than helium (24% relatively) in the GPU-3 Stirling engine.[73] The researcher Allan Organ demonstrated that a well-designed air engine is theoretically just as efficient as a helium or hydrogen engine, but helium and hydrogen engines are several times more powerful per unit volume. "

OK. That makes more sense. I never heard of a Stirling engine before. I assumed it was just some sort of internal combustion engine. Interesting technology. Here's another Wiki link that talks about some of the applications of these engines ( including a few different automobile drivetrains)
 

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Can Opeler
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Many years ago I bought the plans to convert a GT from mother earth
PM me if you’d be willing to send me a copy of those. It shouldn’t be too illegal as it appears Mother Earth no longer offers them lol.
 

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Your Noble Friend ;-)
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Or, better, just post it here???

Dieter
 
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