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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I'm new here and I have a 1968 Kadett LS after a few months of effort I am getting close to getting it running. My current issue is that I have no idea where to find the timing marks on my car. If anyone knows where I can find these marks I would greatly appreciate an answer.
 

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Which engine: 1.1 litre OHV (Over Head Valve, tiny little engine with the intake & carb on top), or 1.5 / 1.9 CIH (Cam In Head, L-shaped valve cover, intake on passenger side)?
 

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I have the 1.5 Litre CIH engine
Once upon a very long time ago, I also had a 1968 Kadett LS Caravan w/ the 1.5 CIH. IIRC the timing mark was the same as many CIH engines, which is a ball bearing embedded in the flywheel, that lines up with a pointer in a hole in the passenger side of the rear of the engine block. You have to shine the timing light down and to the rear, under the intake manifold.

I'll try to post a photo later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is gonna sound kinda stupid but I have no idea where the VIN is located on my car, I've looked everywhere that google told me but I just can't seem to find it. Any tips on where else I should look?
 

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Here is a post to read about ignition timing, and the photo I apparently posted there in 2008:


Sorry, I don't recall exactly where the Manufacturer's plate (true VIN's didn't happen until ~1973), but there should be an aluminum plate with the serial # and such on the "....front of the cowl between the battery and heater plenum on Kadetts... " (from the 1969 Opel Factory Service Manual)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Back with another question, is the throttle on the Weber 32/36 DGEV Carburetor vacuum powered? It would explain a lot of things I don't currently understand.
 

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Back with another question, is the throttle on the Weber 32/36 DGEV Carburetor vacuum powered? It would explain a lot of things I don't currently understand.
The 32/36 DGEV has a mechanical (progressive) secondary throttle plate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When it comes to the throttle on my carb it seems to have lost all ability to open the "flappers" on top after a rebuild I did, I was wondering if this is because it relies on engine vacuum to help with this or if I did something wrong.
 

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When it comes to the throttle on my carb it seems to have lost all ability to open the "flappers" on top after a rebuild I did, I was wondering if this is because it relies on engine vacuum to help with this or if I did something wrong.
The flaps on the top are the choke plates. They should be lightly closed when the engine is cold, and will open gradually as the engine comes up to operating temperature (IF they are adjusted correctly).
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
so what I'm understanding here is that when I actually get the engine to run as it gets warmer the choke flaps will be more willing to open? or should they be able to open fully even when the car is not running, I have the DGEV which is the electric choke model.
 

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They’re designed to be closed when engine is cold. As it warms up they should gradually open and be fully open when engine is warmed up.
A cold engine needs a richer air/fuel mixture (less air) when cold and the choke plates closing restricts airflow. As the plates open more air leans the mixture until it’s suitable for full temperature operation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ah, I see, so once I get the engine running the choke flaps will open easier than when it was cold, and if that doesn't happen then I probably did something wrong in the rebuild, correct?
 

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Check that you have 12 volts on the DGEV, which is the electric choke model. Turn the key on, engine cold, check the choke. Flaps should be closed. Crank Opel. Watch and see if choke opens. If it opens fully when warm, choke fully open, No adjustment needed. If not, adjust. See post 12.
 

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Chokes are quite simple. There is a bimetallic strip inside that expands and contracts with temperature. Not sure if yours is warms up by circulating coolant or by electricity. Assuming it works there isn’t many things that can go wrong. The mechanical connection to the choke plates may be messed up or the choke is not adjusted right. To adjust there are three screws on the round choke housing. Unscrew slightly and rotate the housing cover to adjust. There are probably marks on the cover to indicate which way to rotate. To check the mechanical connection you can loosen those three screws and rotate the housing and the choke plates should move.
 

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My preference, when adjusting the choke, is to keep an 1/8” gap between the choke flap and the choke housing.

I’ll loosen the three screws in the bimetallic element, and put an 1/8” drill bit between the choke flap and housing. Then I’ll adjust the element to the point where the drill bit just becomes loose.

If you have too much tension on the choke flaps the choke will never open fully when warm.
 
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Ah, I see, so once I get the engine running the choke flaps will open easier than when it was cold, and if that doesn't happen then I probably did something wrong in the rebuild, correct?
Well, sorta'. The Weber 32/36 DGEV ("E" for Electric) choke is activated by an electrically heated bimetallic coil (the wire should be powered by an ignition-on source, typically the horn in an Opel GT), which, depending on how it is adjusted, is essentially a timer. More tension on the bimetallic coil, the longer it takes to open the choke plates. I like to set mine to open in 5 minutes. If I drove my Opel GT in the winter here in Canada, I would set it to take longer. Much longer.

If you had a 32/36 DGAV ("A" for Aqua), the engine coolant temperature controls the choke by heating a similar bimetallic coil, so that is a more direct control. But it is still adjustable in the same manner.

Both versions require that they be adjusted according to how long the choke plate is desired to be closed (or partially so).

HTH.
 
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The chassis number will be on a tag riveted to the metal dash on the driver side, and there is a data plate riveted to the cowl duct work next to the heater box(gray funnel/waterfall) in engine bay. On passenger side. It sits vertical between the battery and the heater box
 

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And remember that you will need to set this function as well for your (cold fast idle) to work at all.
Pull breather/filter off to expose intake, with your hands open throttle then open choke plates then let go of throttle then let go of choke plates and it should be active.
You should feel and see choke plates stay open at that 1/8" gap RallyBob mentioned.
If this doesn't happen then you will need to double check your choke plate to throttle plate connections to make sure they are connected and adjusted properly.
HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The chassis number will be on a tag riveted to the metal dash on the driver side, and there is a data plate riveted to the cowl duct work next to the heater box(gray funnel/waterfall) in engine bay. On passenger side. It sits vertical between the battery and the heater box
I've found all of those things but no sign of an actual VIN number, also I have not seen a plate on the driver's side. any idea of where else I could find a VIN and if not how can I acquire a title for my vehicle?
 
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