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Can Opeler
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The stock K cam in the 20S isn't too bad for a daily driver, the same profile is used in the 30E and 30NE six cylinder engines too.
I have never heard that the Frontera should have a different cam than the Omega, both have the U cam. Look for an U stamping in the back end of the cam.
Is the stock cam in the 20S the same as I should have in my 1984 XR2E Head? I’ve been curious how it compares to the early 1.9S cams.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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I have never heard that the Frontera should have a different cam than the Omega, both have the U cam. Look for an U stamping in the back end of the cam.
I'm pretty sure that I was told that the Frontera engines were more "truck torquey" than the more passenger car friendly Omega engines. In the early days of people importing 2.4's to the States, our engines came mostly from England and Fronteras. I'm pretty I was told that those engines had cams that weren't sports car worthy and that folks usually replaced them with the various upgrade cams. I really like the Omega cam my engine has. The torque stays almost exactly the same through the rpm range and the gear shifts of my auto tranny. I can floor it from 0-100mph and not detect acceleration flats spots before and after gear shifts and I almost can't detect the shifts themselves. It's almost like an electric car with consistent torque throughout the whole rpm range.

I'm frequently wrong about engine stuff, so correct me where needed.

:veryhappy
 

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I'm pretty sure that I was told that the Frontera engines were more "truck torquey" than the more passenger car friendly Omega engines. In the early days of people importing 2.4's to the States, our engines came mostly from England and Fronteras. I'm pretty I was told that those engines had cams that weren't sports car worthy and that folks usually replaced them with the various upgrade cams. I really like the Omega cam my engine has. The torque stays almost exactly the same through the rpm range and the gear shifts of my auto tranny. I can floor it from 0-100mph and not detect acceleration flats spots before and after gear shifts and I almost can't detect the shifts themselves. It's almost like an electric car with consistent torque throughout the whole rpm range.

I'm frequently wrong about engine stuff, so correct me where needed.

:veryhappy
Well, the stock C24NE cam is a "tractor" cam, it produces its max power at 4800RPM and max torque at 2800RPM, doesn't sound very sporty to me.:) But when you put a stock C24NE normally used in a 1300-something kg Omega in a 960kg GT it obviously feels different. And a Frontera weighs more than an Omega, which makes it feel even more tired. The cam timing is actually close to the 20E R cam:s, but the longer stroke and increased displacement makes it feel smaller. Irmschers i240 used the R cam, but it produced its max power at 5000RPM instead of the 20E:s 5400RPM.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
The Frontera GVW is 2400kg. The 2.4 moves it along fine. Struggles a bit on hills when towing a laden car trailer as would any machine.
Had a look on old Electronic Parts Catalogue from my Opel Dealer days. The same part No is used for camshaft in C24NE engine in Frontera and Omega. Kat no 636005 part No 90299177.
https://www.yoyopart.com/oem/7052492/vauxhall-90299177.html
I would guess there are different engine ECU set ups for each though which would effect driveability. I recall swapping an ECU from an Omega A fitted with OHC C2.0NE into a Vectra A C2.0NE some years back. The improvement in acceleration in Vectra was very noticeable.
 

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Opel Tinkerer and Rescuer
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The BASE Cams are as noted here in this picture, and marked.

BUT there are variations is each cam ( as noted by the casting numbers to the back of the from journal ).

At least in regards to the post 1984? cams that no longer used the groove on the Cam journal.

I found a 2.0E cam ( Cast with a 8 & stamped with an R ) - I plan on doing its numbers as well.

I also have another 2.0E block in the garage with the cam still in it, One of the two maybe a i200 cam.

But unlike catalogs, and assumptions based off old charts ( that are known to be inaccurate on the later cams - See above ).

I have a cam dial, and a the equipment to spec out the cams.

It is known that GM may have a single part number for a "replacement" part, BUT the replacement part is an "average" part.

The parts for specific cars and applications could vary ( Thus the color coding, and cast numbers on the cams ). To accommodate specific emission regulations, etc.

See this : https://www.opelgt.com/forums/6f-engine-rebuilding/92785-cams-cams-cams-3.html#post1274466

Same is true for Bosch computers for certain makes and models. For the Omega and the Frontera 2.4L motors there are 4 different computers with 4 different computer parts numbers. ALL four cross reference to a SINGLE Bosch part number, that also includes different makes and models. The replacement parts only have to work, so in some cars you get improvement in some you may see a slight loss of power or emissions. But ALL will get you running, and within tolerance.

In short, the specific cam/ecu/etc... in a specific year, make and model of a car are dialed in for that car. The replacement parts are often not.
 
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