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Über Genius
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So... im wondering. Would there be any interests in parts being made by a 3d printer? If what and why?
This has been pondered before.
I use 3D printing to prototype ONLY as the 3D printed parts are less sturdy than a production piece.
 

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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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2,805 Posts
3D printing is often best for use in prototyping, low stress tools, and part of the production process, unless we're talking about 3D printed metal parts. For end-use parts, they can require finishing work if the aesthetic matters and needs to appear like a production part. Resin can be helpful with reinforcing and smoothing 3D printed parts. I think the most interesting contribution of 3D printing is in the production process. You can 3D print molds and parts to create molds, to be used in more traditional production methods. This has resulted in more people being able to create one off and low volume parts, which normally would have used CNC to create the molds or parts.
 

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Certified Opelholic
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1,482 Posts
way back when I took a precision machining class and started working on Opel parts but I got shot down
"
This has been pondered before.
I use 3D printing to prototype ONLY as the 3D printed parts are less sturdy than a production piece. "

I did not know this but I had been wondering how parts would hold up to the high heat inside of cars

# 1 would be intake manifolds
# 2 new vents both in dash and defroster vents
#3 would be fender flares

I have had this these things floating around for years
Automotive tire Audio equipment Automotive exterior Input device Motor vehicle


Engineering Gas Audio equipment Machine Electronic device
 

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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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2,805 Posts
For an intake manifold, I would 3D print it in a casting wax replacement material. Then do lost wax casting to create it out of metal. This is what I will eventually need to do for my 2.4L.
 

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The Young One
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558 Posts
way back when I took a precision machining class and started working on Opel parts but I got shot down
"
This has been pondered before.
I use 3D printing to prototype ONLY as the 3D printed parts are less sturdy than a production piece. "

I did not know this but I had been wondering how parts would hold up to the high heat inside of cars

# 1 would be intake manifolds
# 2 new vents both in dash and defroster vents
#3 would be fender flares

I have had this these things floating around for years View attachment 438568

View attachment 438567
I think fender flares would be a good idea. Mine are cracked very bad form a lot of bondo.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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15,707 Posts
You have to understand the limitations of 3D printing and the plethora of molecular structures that things are made off. Casting often forms a crystalline matrix, forging smashes things into the needed shape, most things are not made of pure anything and are a mix of materials and binding agents to give them strength or flexibility or heat resistance or hardness or etc. Aluminum parts are rarely pure aluminum, they usually have copper, magnesium, manganese, silicon, tin and zinc mixed in. 3D printing generally can't mix all those different elements at the needed molecular level and in the needed crystalline/forged/etc. structure.
 

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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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2,805 Posts
I have a filament 3D printer and two resin 3D printers. Take a guess why I own two of one type and only one of the other. Filament is PITA!!! Too many failed prints for whatever reason, tired of chasing those problems down to get a good print. Resin 3D printers have a higher success rate for printing things and parts are printed at a resolution that you cannot get from a filament printer I guarantee it. My resin printers can do 50 microns in the XY plane (limited by screen resolution) and up to 10 microns for the Z axis. A Creality CR-10 for example has a print resolution of 100 microns. Resin also prints a whole layer all at once. Anyways, those are some of the reasons I ditched filament. The issue of resolution might seem trivial, until you compare the finished results from each.

But unless we're talking metal 3D printers, I wouldn't use anything I printed in my Opel. I plan to create a custom intake for my 2.4 and a custom oil pan as well. I will print these parts, along with other Opel stuff, in a resin suitable for lost wax casting. Once I have the part 3D printed, it goes through a ceramic / green sand process to create a mold. Once this mold is thick enough to be used with a molten aluminum alloy, it will be cured in an oven or kiln. The wax-like resin will melt out of the mold and then the mold is ready. At this time, I could either pour in molten material or I can fill it with powderized metal and then heat up the mold like a crucible to melt the powderized metal. This last bit is a process I've never heard of anyone attempting before. It would use the kind of metal powders that are used in 3D printing. The benefit would be zero casting stresses or flow patterns within the molecular structure. The end part would be as if it was magically made that way. For the most part, that's unheard of in engineering. Forging, casting, stamping, CNC, etc all have unique molecular structures that identify how a part was made, because the metal was never formed while at a molten state and kept that way. So there are flow patterns but this process I want to try at some point wouldn't have any flow patterns. The metal powder would melt and then sit there, like a cup of water slowly freezing into ice. I don't know what sort of challenges this process might have but I could see it resulting in parts that would be impossible to make using forging, casting, or CNC methods.
 

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davegt27 said:
This has been pondered before.
I use 3D printing to prototype ONLY as the 3D printed parts are less sturdy than a production piece. "
I did not know this but I had been wondering how parts would hold up to the high heat inside of cars

# 1 -------
# 2 new vents both in dash and defroster vents
# 3--------

If you need originals?
Wood Auto part Electronic device Metal Electrical supply
Office equipment Triangle Font Office supplies Automotive design
 

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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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2,805 Posts
About the defroster vents, I'm sorry there isn't an option on the market already. I will accept some blame for that, but not all the blame. The vents issue has been around for decades and not solved yet. I think, unless he was joking, Keith is having them made. I have some nice vents I am working on removing green paint, then repainting white, for 3D scanning. Yes, I have been slow on that but I am working on it. There is a company in town I will use for the scanning. Once I have these vents properly scanned, they need some improvements to correct Opel's flow blockages. When a finished CAD file for each of the 4 parts is done, I will provide them to OGTS or whoever wants to invest several thousand into having them made. I don't have that kind of capital on hand and I cannot afford to sit on a few thousand dollars in product waiting for people to buy them. I am working on the vents right now, actually.

I understand some flack for needing to repaint the vents I have and that is why I haven't had them professionally scanned yet. So, I am sorry for that. I had originally painted them green thinking that would help scanners the most because image sensors respond the most to green, hence the green screen being common in movie production. I was wrong, I actually need them to be white. But I am working on this right now, as a distraction from work that I don't want to deal with right now. The cost to have them scanned isn't an issue, it would be like $400.
 

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"they need some improvements to correct Opel's flow blockages"

that is exactly what I was talking about

mine at lest the one I saw a few weeks ago was in great shape
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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15,707 Posts
As we have discussed in the past, the defroster vents are fundamentally flawed in their design. They are way too long and the air dividing fins don't extend deep enough into the vent's plenum to actually divide and disperse the air over their 16" length and then the windshield. Instead, the air tends to just come out the middle 3"-4". As I posted in the past, I use aftermarket vents from Vintage Air. Their vents ARE well designed and DO disperse the air over the whole surface of the glass. I use their short, 4"-5" ones in my custom dashes, oem GTers could use their longer approx. 10" ones with a slotted cover plate.

Automotive tire Bumper Automotive lighting Gas Audio equipment
Hood Motor vehicle Sports equipment Automotive design Automotive lighting
 

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'73 GT
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I'm also a Mk1 VW Scirocco guy and they have a lot of unique parts compared to its cousins the Rabbit/Golf and Jetta so a friend of mine started designing small parts for them and selling through Shapeways. Shapeways prints on demand and has high quality prints and materials. He has made many things from DIN radio gauge panels, small trim clips, seat slider guides, and even rubber door handle and antenna seals, all parts that are NLA from the dealer or even aftermarket suppliers. If you're a good designer, I'd look into doing it that way since it offers a front end, you wouldn't have to tie up your printer and they have the materials and settings dialed to get great looking and durable prints every time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have made a vent diverter for a peterbilt vent so it shoots from the vent to the floor. Floor heat is non existent in a new cab over Pete. I've debated on patenting the idea and selling it. Redesigned twice. Point being is PLA filament was used and stood up to the heat. No warping at all. Of course I used a 50% infill to give it a ridgid construct. I believe a redesign like Scifi has done would be plausible.
 
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