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Good advice, even if you are not new to the hobby.
This one is my mantra:

Buy the best that you can afford

Even if you have the skills to restore a crap box to concourse condition, it will almost always be cheaper to start with a better car.
(and you will get it on the road much sooner, in all likelihood)
 

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1 - Be realistic about your abilities and knowledge
2 - Find other like-minded folks
3 - Pick out a vehicle you can afford
4 - Buy the best that you can afford
5 - Get the car (safely) drivable ASAP
6 - Focus on safety
7 - Have fun

That's a good list, but like much advice, lots of it is not useful to the person who needs it. It's like telling a teenager "don't be awkward" when flirting. If they knew how not to be, they wouldn't need that advice.

For example:

1 - Be realistic about your abilities and knowledge

Someone who's not realistic about their abilities and knowledge, is not realistic about their abilities and knowledge, and this prevents them from being realistic about their abilities and knowledge. If they were realistic about their abilities and knowledge, they'd have a realistic take on their abilities and knowledge. No one who needs this advice would know that they needed it or be able to take it.

3 - Pick out a vehicle you can afford

Someone who picks a vehicle they cannot afford, picked it because they were not aware that they couldn't afford it, because they lacked the ability to discern what they could afford. Far beyond basic budgeting concepts, this largely means having enough knowledge of car restoration (of that specific model) to know all the ins and outs of how much it's going to cost to restore a given carcass. You might not know that certain parts are impossible to find and cost a fortune, so when you see a project that no one else bought and think it's your opportunity and you can afford it, you don't realize why no one bought it. We're spoiled in the GT community that generally no one wants these cars, they're uncommon enough to be interesting, but common enough to find parts everywhere, and with OGTS there's basically nothing you can't replace. But in other car communities, you'd have to have such intimidate knowledge of what restoring those vehicles is like, that by the time you have that knowledge, the advice of "Buy what you can afford" is useless advice to you, you don't need to be told that. You'll know the answer. It's almost like your mother telling you "Be safe!" when you run out of the house, it's a toldjaso if something bad happens, but isn't helpful.

4 - Buy the best that you can afford

The problem with this advice is that it's presumed from the wrong context. The person who needs to hear it won't accept it. They'll interpret it as someone who has more money than them flaunting that it's a waste to do anything other than just spend lots of money just like they do. Someone who wants to save money isn't going to take this advice because they want to save money. But they should, because the real context is that the cheap car costs you more than the better one. So even if you're being cheap, you're better off being less cheap up front, because that's the cheapest way to still do your build.

An auctioneer friend once told me - when I was asking him to keep an eye out for any cheap motorcycle I could throw the engine out of and turn electric - that I will want to spend $500. I told him I wanted to spend less. He said oh I can spend less, but any bike worth less than $500, will cost me more than $500. I bought a bike for $20 with a blown engine and "most" of the rest of the bike except little bits he'd already stripped and sold. Like the headlight assembly, unique to that 3-year range with nothing else even similar. Or the headlight itself. Or the fusebox. Or the rear grab handle. Or the speedometer gear. Or the clogged master cylinders. It looked 98% complete. But without some kind people in the community throwing me their damaged spares and trading for some coincidentally-valuable engine covers, I'd easily have spent over $500 on my $20 bike.

Jury is still out whether I actually learned that lesson then, or whether I ignored the same advice on my current GT(s).

7 - Have fun

Oh thank you wise wizard. I was unaware of the concept of doing things for enjoyment. Who needs this advice, and who, who would need it, would take it?


These ones are great advice though:

2 - Find other like-minded folks
5 - Get the car (safely) drivable ASAP
6 - Focus on safety

They're really all the same advice. Get help so you can get it on the road ASAP. 90% of car projects end up abandoned. Get it rolling first.
 
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