Opel GT Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have a GT I have been working on. It sat for 5-6 yrs. I cleaned it up changed filters, OIL, Drained Gas tank, new starter, Battery, Coil, Condensor, plugs and plug Wires. Since I did all these changes it has run surprisingly smooth...That is until a week ago. It will no longer run smoothly It idles rather randomly, what i mean is it idles high drops down to a spudder then idles high almost normal then sounds like crap again..I changed fuel filter thinking it got clogged from remnents of the five year rest no good it still runs badly. The only thing I can think of is rebuilding the CARB, which I have no clue on how to do.<(Weber)

please any suggestions!
Please.
Civin
:confused:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,576 Posts
Check a couple of things. I'd remove the top of the carburetor and make sure there's no sediment in the bottom of the fuel bowl or any debris hung up at the main jets. Also, remove the primary idle jet and o-ring (make sure the o-ring is intact for starters), and clean out the passages in the carburetor and the idle jet itself with carb cleaner. And check to be sure you didn't break a spring in the mechanical advance of the distributor...if you did, the timing will be sporadic and the idle may 'hunt'. It's fairly common for the lighter weight spring in the advance unit to break, or fall off, or rust and lose tension, etc.

Bob
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
vacuum leaks

I spent the last month tracking down a similar problem on my Kadett and it was finally isolated to a vacuum leak. In my case the line for the brake booster, and the size of the hole changed as the engine vibrated in the car, making for very strange indications. The line has since been replaced, but the lesson is a good one for everyone (I think).

One of the easiest ways to check for vacuum leaks, by the way, came to me from an old farmer back home. His method was to get the car to run at the lowest speed it would stay running, usually with a helper in the car on the pedal. Then using a can of starting fluid (ether) with the nozzle and hoze from some WD-40 to, and a very gentle touch, trace the vacuum hoses in the engine compartment. If there is a vacuum leak the engine will race when the ether gets sucked into the intake, giving you a easy indication of where the leak is. The ether also doesn't stain hoses or the nice polished valve cover because it evaporates away.

If you decide to try this method of leak detection, please us very small ammounts of ether in a well ventilated place, like outside, to keep the risk of fire and explosion down. 1/3 of a can of ether exploding is enough to seat the bead on even the biggest tractor tire, and the stuff should be handled reverently.
Best of luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I removed the top of my CARB last night and I found there was a residue film lining the carb bowl, it had a slight orange tint, (rust)?
I have not checked the spring in distributer yet, I cleaned the main jet and the O-ring was intact. - Thanks RallyBOB

oldopelguy- After I cleaned the CARB I looked around at my Master CYlinder and the hose that connects from the carb, It has a small plastic elbow with an O-ring well the O ring pretty much fell apart as I touched it. Could this be it?

-Thanks Guys:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Sorry about the slow response. More likely is a combination of things but, the vacuum leak from the servo makes a HUGE difference, while a faulty or dirty carburetor can make your car run portly, the up and down of the RPM's can typically be blame on vacuum leaks chief among them the servo-manifold connections, also make sure to have hose clamps on all other vacuum connectors such us the one that goes from the bottom of the manifold to the distributor advance, something else that is some times over looked is to make sure and use correct vacuum hoses, I've seen some people using "garden" hoses and everything in between.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top