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This question isnt really about any body work but it includes it.....I was wondering about how long it would take to completely restore a 73 Opel GT...needs to be completely re-wired, a little body work by the back fender, most of the interior needs to be redone....I'm not expecting anything real precise, but even a vague prediction is welcome.....I'm predicting about a year and a half..since I'm a student and working part time so i don't have a lot of time to work on it...thanks
 

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well ... well... well ...

How about you post some pictures of what it looks like right now?

I can tell you right now, depending on the existing condition of the car, your schedule + many other factors, it can take from months to many years!

I'm sure Gary,Keith and others can give you a more precise time frames, right guys ? :D
 

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there are three big factors,

1.Condition of the car (mainly how much rust does it have)

2.Money(if you spend money on new parts it can be done sooner)

3.Your ability

if you are new to restoring cars it will take you a lot longer, ie it may take you a year to do the body work where as someone with experience can do it in a matter of weeks. If you have the cash to buy new parts for the mechanics of the car you could assemble the car in a few days.
 

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The first time I "restored" my GT, I did it while it was my daily driver, and it took me about four months. Now, that was in 1978, I was 20 (!!) and in University, I lived at home (as in the same place as my parents) so I had lots of disposable income (or so it seems now), I was barely mechanically proficient and I had almost NO tools, and I only had a girlfriend or two to distract me. Oh, and the GT was only 7 years old with 60,000 miles.

The next time, the car was 15 years old (so that would make it 1986), the GT had 102,000 miles, the rust was QUITE a bit worse, the mechanicals were pretty much knackered from 42,000 HARD additional miles, I had a career (so no spare time) but a bunch more mechanical experience and LOTS of tools, a wife and house with a garage (so no spare money, but a place to work) and one kid with two more on the way (over the next 10 years). Yep, I am STILL bloody restoring the damn thing. But at least I don't need it as a daily driver. Hmm, maybe THAT'S why I still haven't finished it, there is not enough motivation. Or time in a day...

Good luck. Get it done now and DON'T wait until you have enough money, time, ability, or motivation. You have all you are going to get, so just do it.

Was that ever deep.

JM2CW
 

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73 Opel Restoration

Dude - You're 20, you're in college, and you're working part time (damn you're in for some good times coming up).

You've got some fierce competition for your time & money. Hopefully you still live at home where you have access to a good selection of tools, garage space, and maybe a dad who's willing to spend some time helping you. Hopefully you're not building a racer.

My son & I worked on his for 3 years. We spent 2 1/2 years messing around. Then 6 months before his 16th Birthday (he's 5 days older than you) we got serious & had it on in 6 months.

Just get the engine running. Get the electrical straightened out.
Get it to a paint shop and have them spray whatever you can afford. If you're in college, don't get the expensive paint, 'cause it'll break your heart when some yahoo chips it in the parking lot.

Good Luck
 

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Restoration Statigy

Keith's story sounds just like mine. My wife got her first GT when we were in college in '77. Three children and 28 years later we've got a GT in our garage waiting for some work.

Same old issues. Time & money. Priorities. Other projects on the house / yard / work.

So here's a thought for us older guys (read that as having better credit than when we were 20).

Maybe I should approach this like a new car. Secure a loan at a favorable interest rate.

Buy engine parts, have machining done.
Sub out for a full interior upgrade at the local shop. (Have some comfortable seats installed for heaven's sake.)
Install a nice sound system (for those 70's tunes).
Sub out for a shop to do all the body work & shoot a custom job.
Throw some very nice wheels on it.
Make paymets for the next 36 months.

We're talkin' a couple of months and some instant gratification. And the job gets done all at once.

Boom! Its ready to go for a ride with your main squeeze. No more piece-meal project. No more waiting for years getting to the paint, just to have the engine crap out again 'cause it's been 10 years since you first rebuilt it.

Thoughts?
 

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That's a good plan, I shoulda done that on my 75 monza when it started getting body cancer. But now it's the only set of wheels functional right now. My GT is undergoing an engine/tranny transplant and serious restoration. It sat on the beach for 8 years after I exploded the engine, the reason for the transplant. Now I'm retarded, with a fixed income and lotsa time. I will contract out what I cannot do or want to do which isn't a lot. The car is being disassembled one system at a time, stripped, treated and repainted with POR-15. The rear-end is done with a ZF posi-tracction, brakes, brake lines, hoses, and hardware are in the works right now. As soon as the brakes are done, the engine/tranny goes in and a whole lot of work integrating the V-6 systems into the GT will be next. After that, take your pick, interior, front end, body work, etc. I had hoped to have it done by the OMC picnic this year, but a 4 month wait for the rear-end slowed me down. If I had the bucks, I would contract everything out, but wouldn't have the satisfaction of doing the bulk of it myself. There is a trade-off there between having it done now or doing it yourself for awhile. I don't know, both have attributes. Because I have more than one set of wheels, I can take the time and do it myself.

Ron
 

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EXACTLY! So just the other night, after I had satisfied a recent midlife crisis by buying an almost new, slammed and tuned Lexus IS300, Myrna (the wonder wife) said to me: "why don't you just get the damn Opel FINISHED by PAYING someone to do it, since you (as in me) seem to have enough money to buy a shiny new red sports car (even if it DOES have four doors), so spend a bit of it to get that @!(&*# car that is taking up half the garage and the guest bedroom with spare parts storage FINISHED!!!". Or words to that effect.

Now, there is NO way that I could let anyone mess with the Opel's mechanicals, since who the heck would I find that would have a clue, let alone satisfy my (increasingly and probably unnecessary) high standards. Hmm, but maybe pay someone to actually finish off the body work so I could re-assemble it? Kind of like my first basement renovation, when I INSISTED on doing everything, including the mudding and taping. And took at LEAST an extra year, since I HATE mudding and taping. The second basement, I paid a professional to mud and tape, and it was finished in record time. Hmm, maybe there's a lesson here???

So, do what I say and not as I do, and do as much as you can on your own, but when something is keeping you from actually finishing (and enjoying) your GT, get out the cheque book (or student loan application) and get the nasty bit done by someone who is good at it.

More 2CW
 

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Uh, Yeah. I get almost the same thing from Margaret, she's the young lady that took the pics for you at the OMC picnic, Keith. She wants her patio back, that's where the cherry picker, engine stand, and engine/tranny are sitting, under cover. She keeps telling friends, she wishes I would get done, but I'm so meticulous in what I do, it's taking too long, (she says), just because it took a month each on polishing two of the wheels, with two more to go. Then she says when I do finish it, my problematic back will go south and then SHE will HAVE to drive the GT. Of course I want to get it done, but, I want to do it right the first time and make it so I don't have to fix something everytime I go out for a drive. Isn't that what it's all about?

Ron
 

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Re: well ... well... well ...

likengtj said:
... I'm sure Gary,Keith and others can give you a more precise time frames, right guys ? :D
Keith's story: The first time I "restored" my GT, I did it while it was my daily driver, and it took me about four months. Now, that was in 1978, I was 20 (!!) and in University, I lived at home (as in the same place as my parents) so I had lots (or so it seemed) disposable income, I was barely mechanically proficient and I had almost NO tools, and I only had a girlfriend or two to distract me. Oh, and the GT was only 7 years old with 60,000 miles.

The next time, the car was 15 years old (so that would make it 1986), the GT had 102,000 miles, the rust was QUITE a bit worse, the mechanicals were pretty much knackered from 42,000 HARD miles, I had a career (so no spare time) but a bunch more mechanical experience and LOTS of tools, a wife (so no spare money) and one kid with two more on the way (over the next 10 years). Yep, I am STILL bloody restoring the damn thing. But at least I don't need it as a daily driver. Hmm, maybe THAT'S why I still haven't finished it, there is not enough motivation. Or time in a day...
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Gary's Story: The first time I "restored" my GT, I did it while it was my daily driver, and it took me about two months to fix some minor rust spots and paint several coats of Flame Red lacquer on it. Now, that was in 1978, I was 30 (!!) and in the divorce process, I lived in several different locations so I had no disposable income, I was just in the process of opening up a garage (to repair air cooled VW's) so I had plenty of "free" time and I only had a girlfriend or three to distract me. :D Oh, and the GT was only 9 years old with 45,000 miles.

Three years later, the GT had 62,000 miles, the rust was coming back, the mechanicals were in pretty good shape (I *was* a mechanic after all), I reailzed I was too honest to make a lot of money in the auto trade so I went and found a "Real job" with benefits. I worked on it very little (over the next 10 years). <Stories change here....Pay attention Keith...> After my Daughter graduated from college, I found the $$ and time to start a total restoration. 5 years later (1997) it was finished and roadworthy. <Stories re-combine here...> Yep, I am STILL bloody restoring the little things on the damn thing. But at least I don't need it as a daily driver as I have an Opel Senator for that. Hmm, maybe THAT'S why I still haven't finished it, there is not enough motivation. Or time in a day...
 

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Ah, the stories of the male life (with female counter-point)! So true, so true. My 2 cents: good advice getting the loan since you're a partime worker at present. Rip out the interior for a shop to do, re-wire yourself and let the bodyshop/mechanics have it after wards. 3k-4K dollars later you will have a fine restore you like and will be driving it. And it's still cheaper than a new, cheap "box car" that goes for 9 or 10 thousand. ENJOY your youth and freedom because one day you'll be saying "Where did it go?" :rolleyes:
 
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