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A very nice unmolested GT (getting hard to find these days). I'm not sure about his $30K asking price, but it would be interesting to see what this one would bring on a good auction site like BAT.
Cheers,
Ron in FL
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A very nice unmolested GT (getting hard to find these days). I'm not sure about his $30K asking price, but it would be interesting to see what this one would bring on a good auction site like BAT.
Cheers,
Ron in FL
I agree, not sure about the price, either. But, who am I to say? You can always go down in price, not up (except at auction).
 

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Certainly not a 30k$ Gt
 
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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Certainly not a 30k$ Gt
No offense intended, Just curious as to why not $30,000.00 I mean, if it is in really super good shape and when you think about the effort it takes to restore one of these cars to close to mint condition - what does it take to command 30,000.00. I have around $20,000 or so in mine and a couple thousand hours in labor - and getting pretty close to a new car - so just curious....
 

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Many things makes this car worth less than $30k:

Headlights don't fit well
Missing badges (no "Opel" on tail)
Missing reverse lamp
Gas cap filler tube is crooked
Headlights are rigged with manual switch
Says it is a 10 year old restoration. Things done 10 years ago are not "like new"

As for what year is it, there are some issues:

The VIN starts with "94201...", which makes it a 1970.
Wheels are '69 or '70
Taillights are '73
The pop out quarter windows makes it a '71 to '73.
Seatbelt lamp indicates it is a '73

The biggest issue is the improper VIN

And my favourite: Claims to be a "numbers car"? No such thing in the Opel GT world
 

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There are a few holes in the story, the biggest one being the chassis number, but a car in great condition deserves a price -- the little issues such as headlights not fitting well and the fuel inlet crooked can likely be taken care of easily. Obviously, a thorough personal inspection is called for to ascertain all of the issues. But the only question left is "how much?" and here the simple economic equation of supply versus demand takes over. There are not many of these cars out there on the landscape, especially ones in really good condition. Unfortunately, there are not a lot of people that really have a great interest in the cars. Ergo, supply meets demand at what we may consider to be an unreasonably low price.

This is not unusual. If you have any experience at all in restoration work, when you watch the auto auction shows such as Mecum or Barrett-Jackson, you realize that the prices most of the cars go for are thousands of dollars below what it cost to bring the cars up to the finish line. I have long opined that the only way to make money in this game is to work on other peoples' cars, for other peoples' money; or do all of the work on your own car yourself and value your time at pennies per fortnight.
 

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Vendor
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Many things makes this car worth less than $30k:

Headlights don't fit well
Missing badges (no "Opel" on tail)
Missing reverse lamp
Gas cap filler tube is crooked
Headlights are rigged with manual switch
Says it is a 10 year old restoration. Things done 10 years ago are not "like new"

As for what year is it, there are some issues:

The VIN starts with "94201...", which makes it a 1970.
Wheels are '69 or '70
Taillights are '73
The pop out quarter windows makes it a '71 to '73.
Seatbelt lamp indicates it is a '73

The biggest issue is the improper VIN

And my favourite: Claims to be a "numbers car"? No such thing in the Opel GT world
Keith,
Good catch on the VIN. I hadn't noticed that. The car is far from perfect, but the flaws appear to be minor in nature and could be set right without a lot of work. The asking price seems "aspirational" and there are very few GTs that have ever reached that price that I know about. Like I said, it would be interesting to see how this one fared on a good auction site.
Cheers,
Ron in FL
 

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1969 Opel Gt 1.9 Automatic
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Yep. It has the 1970 style wheels (my favorite of all the stock GT wheels) A few other minor modifications and updates including the carb, but still a very original looking example.
My 1969 GT has those wheels too. Weren't they for 1969-1970?

Sam
 

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Opeler
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It's definitely a nice one!!!
Don't misunderstand me, this DOES seem like a nice car. But to ask $30k, it has to be a near-perfect Opel GT. And this does not seem to be that. And the mismatched VIN to model year makes me VERY concerned...
 
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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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And we wonder why the price of our GT's are being kept low....Ever heard the phrase - our own worst enemy...
 

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Can Opeler
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Keep the prices low. As soon as the values go up the cars will get noticed and after market parts prices will sky rocket. Opels are one of the cheapest classic cars you can own, upgrade, and maintain. I’m in no hurry to make them worth more.
This was a 12,000 car in the market 8 years ago. I’d value it at 16,000-19,000 in the current market. And I think that’s dead on the money with what these cars should be worth aside from keeping up with inflation.
 
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