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While I am Opel'less, and sitting here with a wallet on life support, my DREAM is still alive and I have a question. If it's answered somewhere already, just direct me to it.

I live in Kansas. I like Kansas. Plenty of room and air to breath. But Kansas gets HOT. While I am shopping for that GT to drive daily, I would like some A/C, if that's possible in a GT.

Is it possible to add on an A/C? If so, What are the pros and cons of such an add-on?

(I have an old PU now with the A/C shot, so I already know that the folded cardboard "fan" isn't that good! ):D

Dan
 

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I bought my 72 GT with the GM AC option installed, minus the console housing. For the nuts and bolts of it I like the setup better than the ARA unit as far as the engine compartment. The ARA compressor is a pain to take out and put back in, which you have to do to change a water pump, it bolts to the pump. Lots of brackets that have bolts only accessible from under the car. The GM unit has a couple of mounting brackets that bolt in above the alternator and also has a backet that bolts to the right side of the engine for an idler pulley to adjust the second fan belt. The compressor is a rotary type that is half as long as the engine. Before I blew a hose on the compressor, the unit would throw out super cold air from between the seats through an open hole. The evaporator is under a false floor behind the seats and has two screened air inlets on each side of it behind the seats and next to the doors. The hoses run under the car along the left frame rail up to the compressor. The condensor is mounted in front of the radiator and the dehydrator is mounted along side the brake booster. You must get another battery pan and rotate it 90 degrees to the original and a couple of inches away from the condensor. With the condensor installed, you have to cut a hole in the belly pan to get the battery in and out. A real PIA. You drop the battery down to the ground, then jack up the car to slide it out. The other alternative is to relocate the battery. I haven't had the false floor out in a long time, so I don't remember the setup there. A lot of stuff to do for AC. There was a thread on the classic opels site about a small compressor I think from a GEO that may work. You may want to check out that site for more info. HTH.

Ron
 

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Underneath the back deck was a double squirrel-cage blower unit. It is entirely self contained, meaning that you remove a couple of screws/bolts and the hole case with evaporator/blower lifts out. A nice setup, in my opinion. But, I have an a/c setup from my Manta that had the compressor mounted low on the passenger side of the motor. Much cleaner installation. I suspect, from the length and position of the hoses in my GT, that it was mounted in the same place as the one on my Manta. And my dryer was up by the hole in the radiator support where the air snorkel gets air.

I, too, like the idea of adapting more modern a/c components. The Mazdas of the late 80's (87 RX7 and 87 B-2000 truck are the two I am certain of) had a completely self contained in dash unit. When you take it out, it is a box with blower and evaporator inside. Very convenient.
My wife had a 91 Toyota Tercel that had really good a/c. It had a nice small compressor and a larger interior volume than a GT, more like a Manta, so it should do just fine.

But if you really want decent a/c, get rid of the black vinyl interior!
 

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I've seen some nice small units in rice burners that I thought would fit in. Little teeny things that seem to work good. That's what I got a eye out for, a nasty rust-bucket Datsun with a working mini AC in it. After this past summer, I agree with ya, dan!
:cool:
 
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