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Hello all,
I do not own a GT but my little brother does, he is also a member of this site. Anyway, I was wondering about aftermarket shiftknobs for the GT. I noticed that it has a thing that you lift up to shift into reverse. Do aftermarket knobs work with this ingenious mechanism? Or do you have to stick with the boring black Opel knob? Any help would be appreciated. Also, have any of you gotten the Ansa exhaust tips from OGTS? I would also like some information on those if any of you have anything.
Thanks
 

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William;
Aftermarket shift knobs will work on the GT shifter as well as the other Opels, you just have to make sure you allow enough room for the ring to be lifted up to be able to shift it into reverse. I have 3 shift knobs right now, two from AMCO, one leather, and one walnut, and one carbon fiber, from a manufacturer I have never heard of. You can search EBAY for the shift knob, they pop up every now and then. As for the ANSA systems, a lot of Opelers out there have them, I did too, many years ago, but, I found it (tail section) to be WAY too heavy and it kept breaking the mounting donuts on a regular basis, like to the tune of a set a month. I finally got tired of buying the donuts and had a total custom 2" exhaust made. It eliminated the rear resonator and just replaced it with a custom "U" pipe to match the openings. There is only the front muffler, and all the hangers are heavy duty ones. The whole system was installed over 15 years ago and I have not touched the system, nor have had any problems, since I drove the car away from the shop. Well worth the money I spent, which was not much at all.
Gene
 

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old school

I had an old-school Hurst shift knob on my last manual-equipped Opel. To make it look a bit more like it belonged, I used the "T" type trigger from an automatic transmission shifter instead of the normal round ring for the reverse lockout. Not at all difficult, and certainly different.
 

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i have put on a mr gasket el chepo t handle on my gt because it has a set screw but i find with a better shift knob i tend to out shift the trans
 

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Here's a question that has been bothering me a bit recently. I have an aftermarket shift knob on my shifter. I like the knob (polished aluminum with an Opel logo in the center), but it uses a plastic bushing that is push fit onto the end of the shifter, and then three allen-head set-screws hold the knob onto the plastic bushing. The first problem is that the reverse lockout collar bumps into bottom of the knob, and it will sometimes jam. The next problem is that my ham-fisted shifting technique is wearing on the plastic bushing and the knob has started to wobble.

One idea that I had is to fill the knob's mount hole with a super hard epoxy, then drill and tap. But this may worsen the reverse lockout situation. Would an epoxy be able to hold a thread? Anyone know the thread pitch and size off hand?

Does anyone know of another way to attach the knob that won't lead to wobbling? Should I scrap it and find a shorter one? Is there anything that can be done about eliminating the reverse lockout (and is this as bad of an idea as it sounds)?

And for the record, the original that came with the car was in even worse shape.
 

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shift knob

The reverse lock-out is there for a reason, to keep from destroying the trans. I had this same problem with AMCO knobs, but, I found, that rather than pressing the knob ALL the way down, I'l lift the lock-out ring and bring the knob down to there and then tighten it down. BTW, I still have all three of the knobs listed in the previous post.
Gene
 

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BQS4 said:
The reverse lock-out is there for a reason, to keep from destroying the trans.
I knew that the lock-out prevented inadvertant reverse gear engagement on the 2-1 downshift, which would therefore destroy the trans (and maybe more). Is there anyway to modify the linkage so that it doesn't interfere with "low-flying" shift knobs?

BQS4 said:
Rather than pressing the knob ALL the way down, I'l lift the lock-out ring and bring the knob down to there and then tighten it down.
This is how I have it mounted now, and certainly a contributing factor in the wobbling that has developed.

How do the other knobs that you mentioned previously fit on? Are they threaded on or use the plastic bushing?
 

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knobs

The AMCO knobs press fit on, but, have no plastic insert, they're metal sleeved inside. The carbon fiber one has plastic inserts
 

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I have this fancy titanium epoxy putty which is suposidly stronger than steel in just about every aspect, its thread-able and machinable. that may work, I'll try to find a website for it.
 

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shiftknob

try using brass shim stock instead of the plastic bushing.it can be cut with a pair of sissors and rolled inside the shifter knob untill you get the it to fit snugly than tighten the set screws.this has worked for me.a soda can (poor mans shimstock)would work if no brass shim stock is available.
 

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A long time ago I broke the reverse lock cable on my only shifter. I fixed it by shortening everything and moving the reverse lock out further down. This may be an option. It was a pain but was pretty cool when finished. the whole thing was about an inch shorter. You could just move the reverse lock down and leave the total height alone. JM2CW
 

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Grant, next time you break the cable, you can use a stainless bicycle spoke to fix it. Just put a full circle in the one end of the spoke, push the pin through the spoke circle, cut it to length and use the setscrew for the lift block and it's done. Permanently.

Ron
 

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When this happened I was in the middle of nowhere, Alaska to be specific. Opel parts were a bit rough, a bicycle part? I think I would have had to order that too. Could it equate to something off a snow machine? That I could get. Ever chain up all four tires on your GT? I have. Or put it in gear and get out and push just to jump in when it gets a bit of traction, or do it often enough to be good at it? Oh the good old days.
 

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Grant, my comparable good old days in comparison to yours are mild. 5 1/2 years in Grand Forks, North, by God, freeze your tutu off, Dakota. All the time I was there, courtesy of the USAF, it never snowed in the month of August, I only got stuck once, when I was blown off the road in a blizzard. And the whole time I had street tires on my cars. Not too bad for a SoCal guy. They never cleared the roads of ice or snow and there were times when the ice would break away from the road and cause 7"-8" deep potholes. Chains on all four tires? Only on the aircraft towing vehicles with four wheel drive. Ahh yes, the good old days. :D

Ron
 

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I just put a small length of wood dowl in the knob's hole. to space it up from the ring, and JB Weld to hold it all together. It's been tight for two years. It's just a cheap knob. ($19.00)
 

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My shift knob had the PO's initials on an aluminium disk on it, so if pryed the disk off and flipped it over and etched a blitz on it with a sand blaster then glued it back on, it doesnt look great but it works.
 

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Im using a drilled out 8 ball, the top of the shifter is tapered so you just have to pound it on a little. It fits the hand amazingly well. no lousy ergonomic crap. and it slides great during quick shifts.
 
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