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Opeler
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This post with a hole through it looks like a spring location. I have read the FSM, and the tech notes from OGTS, and can see a spring, but there is no mention of it in the assembly notes or that it is available to purchase for a replacement part. Can anyone tell me where to find this missing spring?
Wes
Bumper Automotive exterior Auto part Rim Composite material
 

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Two pictures. One end connects to the point shown in your photograph, the other to a small hole in a lip that is between the two flanges of the hood hinge connection on the driver's side.

Unfortunately, as I have mentioned elsewhere, SplendidParts no longer ships to North America. Possibly Gil at OGTS can help source one. The spring is "at rest" when the headlamp doors are open, so you can measure the distance from the post to the hole to see how long the "at rest" spring needs to be, then add the distance when the doors are closed. It is not a heavy spring, and you might be able to find a suitable one at the local hardware store.
Hope this helps.
 

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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Learned something new again - I have never seen that spring before - Will also be interested to hear the purpose as my lights work flip very easily without it - no issues
 

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The spring is under tension when the headlamp doors are closed (headlamps off), when the connecting rod is extended out of its casing. My guess, and a guess only, is that the spring is intended to reduce vibration when the connecting rod is so extended. It is a fairly light spring and I doubt that it has any material effect on opening the doors. If it did have such an effect, then it would have the opposite effect on closing the doors, as the driver would be working against the spring tension to close them.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Probably something like that. The headlights would rattle when latched otherwise. The latching isn't all that rock solid, so a spring to keep the headlights tight against one side of the latch jaws would seem prudent. Theoretically, if you hit a speed bump or pothole, the impact could make your headlights dislodge from their latching and turn off or flicker. Added spring tension could possibly have been added to reduce the chance of this happening.
 

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You missed what I was saying. The spring has nothing to do with holding the doors in place -- it is essentially at rest when the headlamps are on with the doors open. What I was suggesting was that, with the doors shut (headlamps off), the connecting rod is fully extended out of its casing and my thinking is the spring controls some of the vibration that the extended rod might experience.
 

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Über Genius
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It would make sense if the spring helped push the lever forward. I find that to be a little more strenuous than pulling the lever.
 

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Well, at the margin, it does help push the handle forward. When the doors are closed (lamps off), the spring is under tension. In pushing the handle forward to open the doors, the cable moves in the direction in which the spring is relaxed -- in effect, the spring is helping pull the end of the cable back into the casing.

As I said, it is not a big spring, so it would take a pretty fine instrument to measure the difference in forces between opening and closing the headlamp doors.

But in reality, the difference you feel is simply a matter of kinesiology. When pushing the handle forward, you are using both your arms and your back, the musculature in your back being quite significant. When closing the doors, your back plays little to no part -- its all arm and shoulder, with perhaps some leverage gained off a leg.
 

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But in reality, the difference you feel is simply a matter of kinesiology. When pushing the handle forward, you are using both your arms and your back, the musculature in your back being quite significant. When closing the doors, your back plays little to no part -- its all arm and shoulder, with perhaps some leverage gained off a leg.
Sounds like my younger days before I was married LOL :ROFLMAO:
Sorry I couldn't help myself
 

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Ultimately, I was not as good at it as I wished to be, but I spent years on and off of a wrestling mat trying to understand balance, leverage, and, of course, strength. Moving anything heavy is easy, so long as you can get your back into it.
 

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Well, at the margin, it does help push the handle forward. When the doors are closed (lamps off), the spring is under tension. In pushing the handle forward to open the doors, the cable moves in the direction in which the spring is relaxed -- in effect, the spring is helping pull the end of the cable back into the casing.

As I said, it is not a big spring, so it would take a pretty fine instrument to measure the difference in forces between opening and closing the headlamp doors.

But in reality, the difference you feel is simply a matter of kinesiology. When pushing the handle forward, you are using both your arms and your back, the musculature in your back being quite significant. When closing the doors, your back plays little to no part -- its all arm and shoulder, with perhaps some leverage gained off a leg.
Respectfully, if you need to " When pushing the handle forward, you are using both your arms and your back, the musculature in your back being quite significant." it sounds like some lubrication to overcome the friction is in order either in the headlight bucket, HL actuator arm or the cable. Just looking at used parts that I have sold, the part with the potentially most resistance is the cable, and I can easily slide a cable in my two hands.
 

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Respectfully, if you need to " When pushing the handle forward, you are using both your arms and your back, the musculature in your back being quite significant." it sounds like some lubrication to overcome the friction is in order either in the headlight bucket, HL actuator arm or the cable. Just looking at used parts that I have sold, the part with the potentially most resistance is the cable, and I can easily slide a cable in my two hands.
I agree, with the lights properly lubed including the cable and everything adjusted correctly they roll over pretty easy. I can however remember a time when that was not the case......I also remember a time when you had to really slam them or one would not lock - that turned out to be an adjustment on the main rod
 

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It would make sense if the spring helped push the lever forward. I find that to be a little more strenuous than pulling the lever.
If your rotators are very clean and dry lubricated (dry graphite or similar) same with the balance of the operating items AND the cable is kept with no hard bends, the headlights can be opened and closed with ONE finger.
During this video you will see me open and close the headlights with just one finger. Although my finger does initially slip off because of the Armor-All on the lever. The spring is not necessary. If the retainers are working properly, you can beat your buckets to death with a hammer and they will not move. Clean and USE DRY LUBRICATION ONLY. Solvents and wet lubrications trap dirt and eventually make things worse not better.
 

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Vendor
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Nice video. Looks like you have everything very well sorted. Two questions. What is that little white indicator light under the driverside vent? (My 70 GT did not have that) Also, is your ammeter gauge working? Mine would usually register on the positive side when charging-even at idle. Is this the car you hope to sell on BAT?
 

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Nice video. Looks like you have everything very well sorted. Two questions. What is that little white indicator light under the driverside vent? (My 70 GT did not have that) Also, is your ammeter gauge working? Mine would usually register on the positive side when charging-even at idle. Is this the car you hope to sell on BAT?
Rear defroster indicator light, if I recall correctly.
 
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That light must have been added later in 1970 because my original '70 GT had the rear window defroster but I do not recall it having the lamp. My GT back then was an early model for the year, the car having served as the dealer's demonstrator until I purchased it in September of 1970. The 1973 FSM shows an indicator lamp coming off the relay. Interesting, but the 1970 schematic also show an indicator lamp
 
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