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Opelnut
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Ok reassembling Trans to block, Tranny mount, cross member, and a Various other parts for the GT an I began to wonder what the should be used where. I have some stainless bolts which I would like to use but I sure don't want them to fall out so anti seize to help removal down the road or threadlock so they wont come out on accident but may be tough to remove on future repairs.

Also to the rules change if they are the standard Opel bolts for the various pieces.


So aluminum bellhousing to steel block with stainless hardware? and
last question how does the use of threadlock or anti-seize affect torque specs for how tight to make them bolts?


:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:
 

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Opelnut
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Discussion Starter #3

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UFOpel Investigator
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I woud never trust stainless fasteners on anything critical. Just not strong enough, imo.
I worked in the buisiness of building meat processing machinery where we had to use stainless fasteners, and I saw way too many fail.
 

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UFOpel Investigator
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Lock washers should be enough if they are properly torqued.

Harold
Stainless lock washers are a joke. They aren't tempered and will stay flat if crushed.
Just for show.
 

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Stainless lock washers are a joke. They aren't tempered and will stay flat if crushed.
Just for show.
Only bolts that I've been particular enough to source out and use are for the headpipe flange. I like to be able to remove them like they're supposed to come out. I've used SS lock washers there without any problems. Not the same has bellhousing to block but...

Harold
 

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1970-GT
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1,242 Posts
Hi opelnut, don't use SS bolts for high load applications, not strong enough.
Don't like lock-tite for something I want to remove later.
A good grade bolt with anti-seize and a lock washer is best.
Same torque.
My 2 cents.
Lyle
 

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Opelnut
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939 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Had the Stainless hardware.. so the questions remains..

Should I use Anti-seize because there different types of metal to slow/prevent corrosion?

when using anti-seize do you adjust for more or less torque to the spec?

when using thread lock do you adjust for more or less torque to the spec?

The factory torque spec if I recal is for lightly oiled clean steel bolts.
does this change with stainless hardware? and Threadlock? or Antiseize?

right now I am working on bellhousing to block
Tranny mount to tranny
Tranny crossmember to body
are these considered high load?
 

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Registered
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11,747 Posts
So aluminum bellhousing to steel block with stainless hardware? and
last question how does the use of threadlock or anti-seize affect torque specs for how tight to make them bolts?


:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:
In the past I've used the stock bolts for the bellhousing to block without any problems.
The biggest problem that I've come across is the trans to bellhousing.
To help with that issue studs seemed to do the trick for me.
 

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UFOpel Investigator
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Only bolts that I've been particular enough to source out and use are for the headpipe flange. I like to be able to remove them like they're supposed to come out. I've used SS lock washers there without any problems. Not the same has bellhousing to block but...

Harold
Stainless should be fine on exhaust flanges since they aren't critical to your cars safety and dependability. I'm noT saying stainless are sure to fail in critical apps. But I wouldn't run the risk of
failure since they are much weaker then grade five or eight and metric equivalents.

On the SS lock washers. Try testing one by flattening it with vised grips and see what happens. It most likely won't take much effort and also most likely won't spring back completely. Might as well just use flat washers in stainless applications and lock wire or use thread locker or head keepers.
 

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New/Old Owner 1973 GT
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860 Posts
Had the Stainless hardware.. so the questions remains..

Should I use Anti-seize because there different types of metal to slow/prevent corrosion?

when using anti-seize do you adjust for more or less torque to the spec?

when using thread lock do you adjust for more or less torque to the spec?

The factory torque spec if I recal is for lightly oiled clean steel bolts.
does this change with stainless hardware? and Threadlock? or Antiseize?

right now I am working on bellhousing to block
Tranny mount to tranny
Tranny crossmember to body
are these considered high load?
If the spec is lightly oiled, you can use anti-seize or threadlock at the same torque. The properties of either are similar to oil when wet.

As for using lock washers, I would prefer blue locktite instead. Just my preference, but I am not fond of lockwashers, or any washer where the application does not spec it.

Jim :cool:
 

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UFOpel Investigator
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3,472 Posts
Had the Stainless hardware.. so the questions remains..

Should I use Anti-seize because there different types of metal to slow/prevent corrosion?

when using anti-seize do you adjust for more or less torque to the spec?

when using thread lock do you adjust for more or less torque to the spec?

The factory torque spec if I recal is for lightly oiled clean steel bolts.
does this change with stainless hardware? and Threadlock? or Antiseize?

right now I am working on bellhousing to block
Tranny mount to tranny
Tranny crossmember to body
are these considered high load?
I only use anti seize on spark plug threads and exhaust manifold bolts and studs.
For the trans and bell housing I just go with clean dry threads and new lock washers using at least grade five or metric equivalent and torque to spec. I very rarely use thead locker, really only in high vibration applications.
 

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Learned something today, I can go back to bed now. Seriously, I don't see any need to use stainless bolts in most instances unless there is a corrosion problem or a reaction between dissimilar metals. Maybe in the case of T stat bolts.

Most of the bolt problems I've seen on Opel's are; T-stat to water neck, head pipe to manifold, trans to bell-housing and suspension bolts covers most of the common problems. I believe my list covers most of the mechanical end. Excluding trim, bumpers, etc.

Harold
 

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Opelnut
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939 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
So Most here would not use the FREE stainless bolts bolts available. except for Header application and thermostat housing. :ponder: Or for trim an and the like. :ponder:


and when using anti-seize probably best to use (NON) stainless lock washers to assist in keeping the anti-seized bolts in place.


sounds like the wealth of stainless replacement bolts I have does not have as much value as I had hopped, Will shop for standard hardware I suppose. :ugh:
 

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Living in the past
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2,329 Posts
bolt treatment

Learned something today, I can go back to bed now. Seriously, I don't see any need to use stainless bolts in most instances unless there is a corrosion problem or a reaction between dissimilar metals. Maybe in the case of T stat bolts.

Most of the bolt problems I've seen on Opel's are; T-stat to water neck, head pipe to manifold, trans to bell-housing and suspension bolts covers most of the common problems. I believe my list covers most of the mechanical end. Excluding trim, bumpers, etc.

Harold
Anti-Sieze is used when you want to take it apart and especially where dissimilar metals are involved. Stainless steel bolts can be used anywhere that does not require "bolt streach" such as headbolts, rod bolts and main cap bolts because staneless will snap before they will streach, just make sure you use the right grade. Thread locker is used where you don't want the bolt to back out or viberate loose. As far as headpipe to exhaust manifold fastners takes the time to find and use BRASS studs and nuts it will make replacing them a lot easier and your preacher will thank you for not losing your religion and your doctor will be grateful that you did not bust up your hands trying to get those blank-a-de-blank bolts out of that dad-blamed manifold:yup::haha:
 

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UFOpel Investigator
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sounds like the wealth of stainless replacement bolts I have does not have as much value as I had hopped, Will shop for standard hardware I suppose. :ugh:
You guessed'er Chester. :yup:
I had free access for years to stainless fasteners but was warned by the car guys at work to never use them except for non critical applications. I also looked into it myself.
For dressup in critical applications, the hot rod and motorcycle guys use chrome plated, powdered coated or anodized graded fasteners. But stainless steel is a no no.
So you can hold down valve covers, thermostat housings, fan shrouds and such with stainless, but never use it in a stressed application.
 

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Super Moderator
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I use locktite very sparingly. I use anti seize mainly on spark plugs going into Al heads. I have been known to use anti seize on t-stat bolts. I don't care much for brass threads, they strip way too easy to suit me. :sigh:

Harold
 

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I'd use anti-seize on the underside chassis bolts. You know the ones, those you had to cut through to get off like A arms and trailing arms and panhard rods and such.
 
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