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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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16,687 Posts
Just tight enough before they snap off
Ha! I coined a similar catch phrase when I rode and worked on bicycles: "Tighten'er till she strips, then back'er off a 1/4 turn."

Every bolt on a high end bicycle is as small and lightweight as possible and very high quality. But that smallness requires that you have to tighten them almost to the breaking point to handle the rigors of racing and off road riding. Trying to find that line of perfect tightness......but not too tight......can be quite a challenge. I can't say in all the decades I raced and worked in bicycle shops that I ever saw a torque spec for anything and no bicycle shop I ever worked at had a torque wrench. Certainly not ones that were any good on 3, 4, 5mm bolts. You had to tighten every bolt by feel searching for that sudden ramp up of torque that indicates the bolt is as tight as it needs to be
 

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Pedal Smasher
1973 Opel GT
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3,350 Posts
It's not BS and I can make that happen to any Opel right now. I have helped several people with this advice over the years. Gil will even acknowledge what I'm saying is true.
I'm going to back up what Gordon has said, I believe it's entirely possible. We're not talking about deflection that you can see with your eyes, it would have to be measured with a dial indicator to check for axial runout with the dial indicator positioned prior to tensioning the V belt. The crankcase has an air / oil pressurized mixture (thanks to blow-by) that we try to vent with PCV but the reality is that unless the engine has a dry sump oil system, there is still going to be some pressure on the backside of a crankshaft seal. Now deflect the crank say 0.1mm (0.004 inches) towards the alternator while the engine is spinning at 4000 RPM and see if you get a leak. I wouldn't be surprised if a leak happened. I bet the V belt can deflect the crank 0.1mm if you tried to get rid of any play in the belt. We pretend that thick steel cranks don't deflect but the reality is, harmonics at certain RPMs can cause a crank to move a bit. A belt that is too tight can cause lots of parts to wear out faster, that's why the FSM has a specific test in it to measure the belt tension. Engines can be very temperamental and it doesn't take much to make them leak oil. The integrity of the seal just has to be compromised enough for the pressurized air/oil mixture behind it to get past.

It's important to remember that no matter how long you have been involved in something, someone can experience something you never have and other people haven't either. Something that only happens when you really over do it, won't be an issue for the experienced individuals who know not to over do it.
 

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Super Moderator
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14,713 Posts
I checked both the cam button cover and water pump/alternator belt tension.
  1. The cam button cover had oil buildup, which I cleaned. Is there a torque spec for it?
The 6 mm bolts commonly used on the CIH accessories are typically tightened to 5-7 ft lbs….very modest torque.

Now, the front cam cover is unique in a few ways. It is used to establish camshaft end-play.

Due to tolerance stack-up, adjustments may or may not be necessary. The thickness of the gasket under the cover is one tolerance. The thickness of the head casting is another. Then the thickness of the cam gear, and the length of the nylon camshaft thrust bolt.

Typically, during engine assembly the front cover is tightened up (slowly) and a feeler gauge is used between the nose of the cover and the nylon cam thrust button to establish camshaft endplay. It should be .004” to .008”.

If the endplay is too large, then a thinner front cam cover gasket can be fitted, or the cover can be removed, a metal drift can be used to extend the nose of the cam cover (this is a factory authorized technique BTW!), and endplay checked once again.

Now, if the end play is too tight, or non-existent, a thicker gasket can be fitted, or the cam cover can again be removed, and the endplay adjusted by hammering on the nose of the cam cover.

So, that said, if your engine has insufficient camshaft endplay, then POSSIBLY it was impossible to fully tighten the bolts holding the cam cover in place. That would create an oil leak.

If all you do is crank those bolts tight without checking camshaft endplay, you may be crushing the nylon thrust bolt that is screwed into the end of the cam. With zero endplay being the result.

So, you may want to pop off the valve cover and check that.
 

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Opel Key Master
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5,463 Posts
Guys, he has air conditioning on this, so if the alternator belt was too tight, the compressor belt is countering the effect of the pulley being pulled over. I will say this in a way everyone can understand. You have to give the original poster baby-steps. He is not a mechanic, and doesn't realize he is dealing with 50 year old technology for the most part. I'm not criticizing him, it's just the facts. He can do stuff just enough to get himself in trouble. An example was when he first bought the car, he drove into his garage, and it wouldn't start. He put an alternator in it I believe and a new battery...still wouldn't start and was getting smoke from the dash. I went to pick it up, and stated I will get it started, and drive onto the trailer, which I did. But not after discovering the battery was hooked up backwards. Now for an everyday mechanic, this wouldn't happen, so just be cautious of what you suggest doing, and if it is a bit more advanced...recommend taking to a repair facility and have them do those things
These cars will never be brand new, no one can warranty oil leaks on these old engines and setups. Its honestly part of having an old car. He is just going to have to realize this. Seals go bad, cork gaskets leak, parts fail.
 

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Registered
1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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1,052 Posts
Opelspyder has a valid point. There are a lot of people on this site with varying degrees of skill including actual mechanics. Many people on this site have not only owned their GT's for 30 40 50 years and may, like me, have taken basically everything off of the car that can be removed and put it back together themselves. There is a big difference from having a car completely redone for you and doing it all yourself - you miss all the fun and experience that goes with that years long project. Fun can mean lots of long hours and frustration, but the way. I think our new member will however be like most of us that just jumped in and learned from this forum and tackled projects - the big difference is, he will, as Opelspyder pointed out, still have projects, just not nearly as many. I mean does anyone have an Opel that something doesn't need to be fixed.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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16,687 Posts
Thanks for letting us know about his skill and experience level, Keith. We're just trying to help him fix it himself, if possible, and save you from having to deal with it. And, like I said earlier, Opels leak, sometimes you just have to accept it and move on with your life.

:)
 

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2,628 Posts
Our two daily drivers are newish, both over 100k miles, and they always have something to fix, or maintain anyway. Brakes, shocks, batteries, alternators, hoses, plug wires, etc. No car is maintenance free after the first few thousand miles.
 

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43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #109 ·
All,
Keith is right, I’m not a mechanic and have very limited experience working on cars. I appreciate all your suggestions and recommendations. Unless the repair is truly minor, I will take the car to a mechanic. I’ve located a few in the area that I'm using.


Keith,
Thanks for the help.

Chris
 

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Opeler
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16 Posts
Guys,
My experience aside, please keep feeding me suggestions on repairing the car remaining problems. Several of you have leak free cars. I hope to have one too.

Your suggestions are helping me and the local restore shops I’m interacting with. These are unique cars and we need your experience and wisdom to make the corrections needed.

Thanks again for taking me in hand,
Chris
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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16,687 Posts
First, rather than "Bad Rebuild" being your defining thread, why not start a new thread and keep all your efforts and endeavors in one thread with a nice title. Call it something simple like "The Creasy Mobile" or "Chris Creasy's GT Log". Then, as the months and years go by, all your discussions, successes, failures, and various info given to you will all be in one place that you can find easily and it will eventually turn into a long story about your saga with your car.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
All,

Thanks again for your help.

I really don’t think the title is a root cause for my car repair needs. Or a significant risk due to my inexperience, any more than it did when you first started working on your cars. The fact that the rebuild was a failure, for the money paid, shouldn’t be in questions. I’m sure none of you would be happy with the final product given the cost. Telling me to just accept what I have doesn’t seem to be an unbiased comment.

There are 3 major repairs that I need to make to my car:

  • The engine leaks. I feel good about what you’ve had me implement.
  • The transmission speedo cable leak and wrap. I like the idea of plugging the hole and using a GPS speedometer.
  • The headliner falling. I’m still working on the plan for that. I was thinking about calling several of you in a few weeks to talk through some ideas.
Again, I’m very grateful for all of you, and your help in taking an expensive mess and making it better. You’ve all been great and super supportive. I need you all and hope to be able to help others one day.



Thanks,

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #115 ·
All,
I’m off until Tuesday of next week. I’ll be replacing the mid muffler, the exit weld broke. Gill sent me a replacement. I’ll be road testing to see if the changes you and I made solves the oil spray issue.

Does anyone have experience regarding paint just popping up from the metal? The top right corner of the driver’s door has this problem. I’ve touched it up as best I can for now. A local shop is going to look at it and correct. Just wondering what could have caused it.

How hard is it to adjust the hood clearance? The hood has rubbed the paint off at the very front. This is a lipstick issue.

Any comments are welcomed,
Chris

Motor vehicle Automotive design Fixture Vehicle door Car seat cover
Automotive lighting Hood Rectangle Bumper Font
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
Joined
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16,687 Posts
All,
I’m off until Tuesday of next week. I’ll be replacing the mid muffler, the exit weld broke. Gill sent me a replacement. I’ll be road testing to see if the changes you and I made solves the oil spray issue.

Does anyone have experience regarding paint just popping up from the metal? The top right corner of the driver’s door has this problem. I’ve touched it up as best I can for now. A local shop is going to look at it and correct. Just wondering what could have caused it.

How hard is it to adjust the hood clearance? The hood has rubbed the paint off at the very front. This is a lipstick issue.

Any comments are welcomed,
Chris

Let me start off saying that this thread's title and it's implication that the whole car was a bad rebuild is very upsetting and it forces us to defend Keith every single minor defect and the implication that you got ripped off by the only Opel rebuilder in the country. Keith and his father have rebuilt Opels for decades and most of the cars they have done stand as the best restores of Opels you'll find anywhere. His cars have won countless Best of Show awards. He's backed up with work for almost 2 years and even I, arguably one of the most well-known GTers in the world, can't get any of my cars done by him unless I'm willing to wait 2 years. I probably couldn't afford it even if he could squeeze me in. No other shop you can find will have the knowledge of every single square inch of the car that he has nor the access to hard to find parts. You, nor anyone else, would have AC in their cars if it weren't for him. Heck, you wouldn't even be able to get a decent looking radiator shroud if it wasn't for him. You don't know recent GT history, but many of the parts we can now get were simply impossible to get just 15-20 years ago and were flat out unavailable for the preceding 20 years. Lenses, window rubber, new seat covers, reclaimed dashes, new fuse boxes and wiring, etc. were all impossible to find. I don't know what you paid for the fix up, nor what condition it was in when you got it, nor what hidden horror stories were there when he started digging into it, but whatever you paid was peanuts compared to what people have to pay to get a car fixed up.

Ever been to a car show? Take a look at all the '57 Chevy's, the quintessential car show car, that you'll see. Every single one of them is perfect EVERYWHERE. Every one of them has had at least $75K-$100K spent on them and they were mostly done 20-30 years ago. To fix up a '57 Chevy nowadays, to the level of the examples I've seen at shows, would cost you $100K-$200K easy. And compared to trying to fix up a GT, they're child's play and easy to fix up. You can take every part of the car off and redo every square inch of them. You can't do that with a GT, they're unibody egg shells, you simply can't get at or even see the other side of the body panels and hidden panels that you don't even know exist unless you chop them apart. These cars are a royal PIA to fix up, every single dang part is hard to reach or get at and finding new replacements for many items is impossible. For all intents and purposes, you can't get new body panels and taking off and reinstalling the existing ones is the nastiest metal working job imaginable, hence, almost no one has replaced any of their GT panels with new ones. So, we're forced into trying to fix a cracked, rusty, egg shell with the yoke still in it. You do the best you can. Keith can only charge just so much, only as much as the market will bear. Even the most fixed up, tricked out, modernized GT or a super oem showroom perfect one with 5 miles on the odometer that was kept in a plastic bag filled with nitrogen for 50 years would barely sell for $20,000. People pay big bucks to have GT's fixed up because they want a nice looking and working GT NOW and they have the money to pay for it and don't want to do any of the work themselves.

Poor guys like myself and most others, hence the name Poor Man's Vette, could never afford to pay a shop........any shop......to fix up a GT to the level that Keith fixes them up to. A few people, like myself, DO try to fix up GT's to the level of Keith's work, but it takes us years and THOUSANDS of hours of work, research, parts hunting, planning, and money. It could be argued that my "GTX" car is a $100,000 car with all it's mods and customizations. If you paid someone to make from scratch all the stuff it has on it, it would easily cost that much. Your car is nicer than mine. It's more perfect and cleaner in every way. I've had at least 8 full body paint jobs and several dozen parts painting jobs done on my GT's over the past 40 years, everyone one of them got paint chips within the first 6 months and most of my repaints were to done to fix the paint chips. I don't care what anyone says, new modern paint just doesn't stick as well as the original factory lead-based primer/paint applied to the freshly acid dipped factory bare metal, WITH NO BODY PUTTY under it. You have to apply body putty to these 50 year old cars when you fix them up, their metal is super thin and they routinely have hundreds of small micro-dents thinner than a human hair. If you want a perfect mirror finish GT, then you HAVE to put a skim coat of putty.......or layers of primer.......the thickness of a human hair on them. That primer and putty screws up any paint manufacturer's claims that their paint will last 100 years. The putty and primer makes the paint job vulnerable to chipping in those areas. In cars that have a lot of putty and primer, like the GALLONS of putty on my GTX car, the whole car is one big paint chip waiting to happen. I've easily got a hundred paint chips on that car and yet I win car shows with it. I try to touch up as best I can, but it's a losing battle, eventually I'll need a whole car multi-thousand dollar repaint. "Eventually" as is in: NOW. Thankfully, car show judges understand that paint on old cars chips and they overlook them if the rest of the car is really amazing.

GT's leaked when they were brand new on the show room floor. Many cars did. These are primitive, low budget, sports cars that were never designed and built to last 50 years. I had and saw GT's that were rusted out from head to toe when I first got into them in 1979. Totally covered in rust with holes in them just 5-10 years after they were sold new off the show room floor. There's the legendary story that you could go into a Fiat dealership, back in the day, to buy a brand new one and you would find substantial rust on them with zero miles on the odometer. European cars from that era were known for rusting and having crappy paint. Their low budget production caused manufacturers to use less than the best manufactured parts and every company made their own engines, many of which were total crapp. Some companies, like Mercedes and Rolls Royce, made really well designed engines, bodies, and paint.......and you paid big for that level of excellence. Most, however, did not. Many brands of cars were laughable in how bad they were. This low budget approach kept the European car companies in business. Everyone had to replace their cars with new ones every 5-10 years. This replace your car every 5 years was also rampant in the American car market also. You may have heard the term "Planned obsolescence", American car companies embraced this concept as a general business practice back in the day. The word "Lemon" was created during that era. Brand new flat head engine Fords would come from the factory with half the engine's coolant passages blocked due to collapses of their primitive engine casting methods. They would overheat driving them home from the dealership.

Blah, blah, blah. So, what I'm saying is that no matter how much you paid you're going to get paint chips, leaks, and little quirky issues, even if you paid Keith $100K for your car. It's an Opel made with Opel parts, some of those parts were really good and lasted a long time, but many parts were crapp right from the start and should never have been put on the car. Live with it, deal with the issues as they crop up, same as you would with any Euro car or any car from that era.



Your questions:
The hoods:
They are cheap crapp held together by glue and folded over metal. Only the hinge mounting plate at the front is welded or braised to the rest of the hood. They're so weak and crappy that they didn't even install springs to hold them open. The method for closing them, done by many people, was to just drop them and let them slam shut. Aaagghh! The flimsy piece of metal that the hinges are mounted to is such crapp that it's a miracle that our hoods don't blow off just driving down the road. Flex, flex, flex is the name of the game with them. Aligning them is a royal PIA and you chip the paint trying to do so. It's wise to put protective masking tape all around the hood and the car's hood opening when trying to align them and it's often best to align them by removing the engine, closing the hood, and doing the bolt tightening while sitting hunched down inside the engine compartment. And even then you'll fail at getting them perfect. One one thousandth of an inch off with the bolting will cause the hood to hit somewhere. Your hood, it appears, needs to have the whole hood slid rearwards at least 1/8", so that it doesn't hit the front of the hood opening. This means loosening all 4 bolts or a back and forth loosening of 2 bolts on one hinge and cocking it at a slightly off center angle, and tightening, then loosening the other hinge side, straightening it out so that it doesn't hit the sides at the rear of the opening, and tightening. Then checking that it's not hitting anywhere and making sure that you didn't slide it back so far that the hood hits the windshield wipers. Repeat the process if you are hitting anywhere. Buy a 6 pack, you'll be at it for a while.

The paint chips:
Already described in my opening comments. Use touch up paint. Continue to do so as the years go by. Be very careful with your car in regards to paint chipping, pretend it's made out of glass. Modern cars are galvanized or use composite panels that don't rust, even if you have vast swaths of paint chip off. Not so with old, untreated, plain steel cars. I had a '74 Firebiird that got a rear fender ding and paint chip the size of a quarter on it. I didn't do anything about it and I lived at the beach in a highly salt corrosive environment. In just one year, I had a football-sized hole in my fender that would enable you to stick your head in the trunk through the side of the car. Nowadays, as soon as I see a paint chip I run for the touch up paint as soon as I see it and dab some on to seal the metal from the atmosphere. It is an incredibly time consuming task to fix paint chips, go look on YouTube for videos on how to fix paint chips. It takes DAYS to fix just one and you have to build up layers of touch up paint until the paint is ABOVE the original paint surface, then lots of sanding/polishing with unbelievably fine 3000 grit sandpaper. And just hope that your touch up paint actually matches. In 40 years I've never had any touch up paint actually match, even if I had a bottle of the stuff from when it was originally painted. You'll no sooner get all your paint chips fixed when a tiny pebble will chip your paint and you'll have to start all over again. Like I said, pretend that your GT is made out of glass.
 

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Opeler
Joined
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16 Posts
Let me start off saying that this thread's title and it's implication that the whole car was a bad rebuild is very upsetting and it forces us to defend Keith every single minor defect and the implication that you got ripped off by the only Opel rebuilder in the country. Keith and his father have rebuilt Opels for decades and most of the cars they have done stand as the best restores of Opels you'll find anywhere. His cars have won countless Best of Show awards. He's backed up with work for almost 2 years and even I, arguably one of the most well-known GTers in the world, can't get any of my cars done by him unless I'm willing to wait 2 years. I probably couldn't afford it even if he could squeeze me in. No other shop you can find will have the knowledge of every single square inch of the car that he has nor the access to hard to find parts. You, nor anyone else, would have AC in their cars if it weren't for him. Heck, you wouldn't even be able to get a decent looking radiator shroud if it wasn't for him. You don't know recent GT history, but many of the parts we can now get were simply impossible to get just 15-20 years ago and were flat out unavailable for the preceding 20 years. Lenses, window rubber, new seat covers, reclaimed dashes, new fuse boxes and wiring, etc. were all impossible to find. I don't know what you paid for the fix up, nor what condition it was in when you got it, nor what hidden horror stories were there when he started digging into it, but whatever you paid was peanuts compared to what people have to pay to get a car fixed up.

Ever been to a car show? Take a look at all the '57 Chevy's, the quintessential car show car, that you'll see. Every single one of them is perfect EVERYWHERE. Every one of them has had at least $75K-$100K spent on them and they were mostly done 20-30 years ago. To fix up a '57 Chevy nowadays, to the level of the examples I've seen at shows, would cost you $100K-$200K easy. And compared to trying to fix up a GT, they're child's play and easy to fix up. You can take every part of the car off and redo every square inch of them. You can't do that with a GT, they're unibody egg shells, you simply can't get at or even see the other side of the body panels and hidden panels that you don't even know exist unless you chop them apart. These cars are a royal PIA to fix up, every single dang part is hard to reach or get at and finding new replacements for many items is impossible. For all intents and purposes, you can't get new body panels and taking off and reinstalling the existing ones is the nastiest metal working job imaginable, hence, almost no one has replaced any of their GT panels with new ones. So, we're forced into trying to fix a cracked, rusty, egg shell with the yoke still in it. You do the best you can. Keith can only charge just so much, only as much as the market will bear. Even the most fixed up, tricked out, modernized GT or a super oem showroom perfect one with 5 miles on the odometer that was kept in a plastic bag filled with nitrogen for 50 years would barely sell for $20,000. People pay big bucks to have GT's fixed up because they want a nice looking and working GT NOW and they have the money to pay for it and don't want to do any of the work themselves.

Poor guys like myself and most others, hence the name Poor Man's Vette, could never afford to pay a shop........any shop......to fix up a GT to the level that Keith fixes them up to. A few people, like myself, DO try to fix up GT's to the level of Keith's work, but it takes us years and THOUSANDS of hours of work, research, parts hunting, planning, and money. It could be argued that my "GTX" car is a $100,000 car with all it's mods and customizations. If you paid someone to make from scratch all the stuff it has on it, it would easily cost that much. Your car is nicer than mine. It's more perfect and cleaner in every way. I've had at least 8 full body paint jobs and several dozen parts painting jobs done on my GT's over the past 40 years, everyone one of them got paint chips within the first 6 months and most of my repaints were to done to fix the paint chips. I don't care what anyone says, new modern paint just doesn't stick as well as the original factory lead-based primer/paint applied to the freshly acid dipped factory bare metal, WITH NO BODY PUTTY under it. You have to apply body putty to these 50 year old cars when you fix them up, their metal is super thin and they routinely have hundreds of small micro-dents thinner than a human hair. If you want a perfect mirror finish GT, then you HAVE to put a skim coat of putty.......or layers of primer.......the thickness of a human hair on them. That primer and putty screws up any paint manufacturer's claims that their paint will last 100 years. The putty and primer makes the paint job vulnerable to chipping in those areas. In cars that have a lot of putty and primer, like the GALLONS of putty on my GTX car, the whole car is one big paint chip waiting to happen. I've easily got a hundred paint chips on that car and yet I win car shows with it. I try to touch up as best I can, but it's a losing battle, eventually I'll need a whole car multi-thousand dollar repaint. "Eventually" as is in: NOW. Thankfully, car show judges understand that paint on old cars chips and they overlook them if the rest of the car is really amazing.

GT's leaked when they were brand new on the show room floor. Many cars did. These are primitive, low budget, sports cars that were never designed and built to last 50 years. I had and saw GT's that were rusted out from head to toe when I first got into them in 1979. Totally covered in rust with holes in them just 5-10 years after they were sold new off the show room floor. There's the legendary story that you could go into a Fiat dealership, back in the day, to buy a brand new one and you would find substantial rust on them with zero miles on the odometer. European cars from that era were known for rusting and having crappy paint. Their low budget production caused manufacturers to use less than the best manufactured parts and every company made their own engines, many of which were total crapp. Some companies, like Mercedes and Rolls Royce, made really well designed engines, bodies, and paint.......and you paid big for that level of excellence. Most, however, did not. Many brands of cars were laughable in how bad they were. This low budget approach kept the European car companies in business. Everyone had to replace their cars with new ones every 5-10 years. This replace your car every 5 years was also rampant in the American car market also. You may have heard the term "Planned obsolescence", American car companies embraced this concept as a general business practice back in the day. The word "Lemon" was created during that era. Brand new flat head engine Fords would come from the factory with half the engine's coolant passages blocked due to collapses of their primitive engine casting methods. They would overheat driving them home from the dealership.

Blah, blah, blah. So, what I'm saying is that no matter how much you paid you're going to get paint chips, leaks, and little quirky issues, even if you paid Keith $100K for your car. It's an Opel made with Opel parts, some of those parts were really good and lasted a long time, but many parts were crapp right from the start and should never have been put on the car. Live with it, deal with the issues as they crop up, same as you would with any Euro car or any car from that era.



Your questions:
The hoods:
They are cheap crapp held together by glue and folded over metal. Only the hinge mounting plate at the front is welded or braised to the rest of the hood. They're so weak and crappy that they didn't even install springs to hold them open. The method for closing them, done by many people, was to just drop them and let them slam shut. Aaagghh! The flimsy piece of metal that the hinges are mounted to is such crapp that it's a miracle that our hoods don't blow off just driving down the road. Flex, flex, flex is the name of the game with them. Aligning them is a royal PIA and you chip the paint trying to do so. It's wise to put protective masking tape all around the hood and the car's hood opening when trying to align them and it's often best to align them by removing the engine, closing the hood, and doing the bolt tightening while sitting hunched down inside the engine compartment. And even then you'll fail at getting them perfect. One one thousandth of an inch off with the bolting will cause the hood to hit somewhere. Your hood, it appears, needs to have the whole hood slid rearwards at least 1/8", so that it doesn't hit the front of the hood opening. This means loosening all 4 bolts or a back and forth loosening of 2 bolts on one hinge and cocking it at a slightly off center angle, and tightening, then loosening the other hinge side, straightening it out so that it doesn't hit the sides at the rear of the opening, and tightening. Then checking that it's not hitting anywhere and making sure that you didn't slide it back so far that the hood hits the windshield wipers. Repeat the process if you are hitting anywhere. Buy a 6 pack, you'll be at it for a while.

The paint chips:
Already described in my opening comments. Use touch up paint. Continue to do so as the years go by. Be very careful with your car in regards to paint chipping, pretend it's made out of glass. Modern cars are galvanized or use composite panels that don't rust, even if you have vast swaths of paint chip off. Not so with old, untreated, plain steel cars. I had a '74 Firebiird that got a rear fender ding and paint chip the size of a quarter on it. I didn't do anything about it and I lived at the beach in a highly salt corrosive environment. In just one year, I had a football-sized hole in my fender that would enable you to stick your head in the trunk through the side of the car. Nowadays, as soon as I see a paint chip I run for the touch up paint as soon as I see it and dab some on to seal the metal from the atmosphere. It is an incredibly time consuming task to fix paint chips, go look on YouTube for videos on how to fix paint chips. It takes DAYS to fix just one and you have to build up layers of touch up paint until the paint is ABOVE the original paint surface, then lots of sanding/polishing with unbelievably fine 3000 grit sandpaper. And just hope that your touch up paint actually matches. In 40 years I've never had any touch up paint actually match, even if I had a bottle of the stuff from when it was originally painted. You'll no sooner get all your paint chips fixed when a tiny pebble will chip your paint and you'll have to start all over again. Like I said, pretend that your GT is made out of glass.

Gordon,
Thanks for the note and history.

Chris
 

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Opeler
Joined
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16 Posts
All,
The mid muffler has been replaced. The car sounds totally different. There may have been a crack from the beginning, given the sound change.

I’m still checking for oil spray. None so fare.

Thanks,
Chris
 
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