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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Team Opel,

I apologize in advance if I've posted this in the wrong section. I've been searching and scanning the forums for information and resources about lowering the suspension on a 1975 Opel Manta. I've found many threads, but somehow I'm not able to locate what I'm looking for... In fact, I'm feeling more unclear on the process, resources and available part vendors now, after reading/ascending down that rabbit hole.

I'd really love to drop the front-end of my Manta to give it more of an agressive stance. When I look at pics of the other Manta's online - I see that about 90% of them seem to be lowered and raked looking super great (IMO) aesthetically. My stock suspension (has a good ride) but, seems to point the front end nose up- which I think looks ridiculous. Any best practices/ lowered coil vendors/ resources out here for how to best circumvent this annoying symptom of the stock suspension?

I've purchased new tires 175/70/13 front and 185/70/13 in rear.. It's not much variance, but might have helped a little bit. But, looks like it needs another 1.5 inches or so.

Thanks - I appreciate and welcome any information, suggestions, guidance that anyone can provide. 20200110_142135.jpg
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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1,244 Posts
That will do it.... but be aware that the springs will become stiffer when you cut coils out of them. I've modified the length of these springs by clamping them and heating them to 500F in an oven. Takes some work and patience to not over do it.

These cars' stock springs are a bit smaller in diameter than standad 5" coil springs. I have also used 5" springs and worked on the ends to make them fit in the smaller spring perch diameters.

BTW, when you lower the front, you are going to change the camber on the front wheels. It does not change as badly when lowering versus raising, but be aware of this. Don't over do it.

I may have some springs for these cars made for a lower height, at least for the fronts. I can look if you like. I don't lower my cars so will not need them. They will be stiffer for sure, as they are autocross springs. (Assuming I have them for the Opel and not for another car.) And of course, this means you could look around and see if someone sells such springs for the Manta/Ascona A and just buy them. Some Opel racer may have some squirrelled away.

ANd of course, changing or modifying springs means you have to remove them. The rear is not hard, but the fronts need certain equipment and precautions. So do you have a good floor jack and a piece of chain and a place to work?
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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1,244 Posts
BTW, if you could find some stock springs up there, it would make experimenting a lot better. I have some extra stock springs I won't used but am on the other side of the USA.
 

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Opel Key Master
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I recently had a set made at Kansas Coil Spring Specialties, if I recall, there is a lot of information on here, but I think Rallye Bob had sent them NOS springs to go by, but they seemed confused as to having the spring specs when I contacted them. So I found some more information about the OE spring specs that Bob had posted, and they made them, I didn't want it much lower than factory, but they can make for any amount of lowering you want
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I recently had a set made at Kansas Coil Spring Specialties, if I recall, there is a lot of information on here, but I think Rallye Bob had sent them NOS springs to go by, but they seemed confused as to having the spring specs when I contacted them. So I found some more information about the OE spring specs that Bob had posted, and they made them, I didn't want it much lower than factory, but they can make for any amount of lowering you want
Awesome - Thanks for the info... let me see if I can track down this Bob guy. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That will do it.... but be aware that the springs will become stiffer when you cut coils out of them. I've modified the length of these springs by clamping them and heating them to 500F in an oven. Takes some work and patience to not over do it.

These cars' stock springs are a bit smaller in diameter than standad 5" coil springs. I have also used 5" springs and worked on the ends to make them fit in the smaller spring perch diameters.

BTW, when you lower the front, you are going to change the camber on the front wheels. It does not change as badly when lowering versus raising, but be aware of this. Don't over do it.

I may have some springs for these cars made for a lower height, at least for the fronts. I can look if you like. I don't lower my cars so will not need them. They will be stiffer for sure, as they are autocross springs. (Assuming I have them for the Opel and not for another car.) And of course, this means you could look around and see if someone sells such springs for the Manta/Ascona A and just buy them. Some Opel racer may have some squirrelled away.

ANd of course, changing or modifying springs means you have to remove them. The rear is not hard, but the fronts need certain equipment and precautions. So do you have a good floor jack and a piece of chain and a place to work?
Thanks for the information - I appreciate it!! In terms of camber... I'm hoping that 1- 1.5" doesn't effect too much. It seems like everyones doing it, without much trouble. It's kind of amazing how hard it is to track down this information. But, I suppose we aren't talking about a Honda Civic here lol! Yes, I do have the required equipment, but still a bit gun shy on performing the process. I will definitely be reading more tech tips and watching videos before I attempt to release the tension on those front springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That will do it.... but be aware that the springs will become stiffer when you cut coils out of them. I've modified the length of these springs by clamping them and heating them to 500F in an oven. Takes some work and patience to not over do it.

These cars' stock springs are a bit smaller in diameter than standad 5" coil springs. I have also used 5" springs and worked on the ends to make them fit in the smaller spring perch diameters.

BTW, when you lower the front, you are going to change the camber on the front wheels. It does not change as badly when lowering versus raising, but be aware of this. Don't over do it.

I may have some springs for these cars made for a lower height, at least for the fronts. I can look if you like. I don't lower my cars so will not need them. They will be stiffer for sure, as they are autocross springs. (Assuming I have them for the Opel and not for another car.) And of course, this means you could look around and see if someone sells such springs for the Manta/Ascona A and just buy them. Some Opel racer may have some squirrelled away.

ANd of course, changing or modifying springs means you have to remove them. The rear is not hard, but the fronts need certain equipment and precautions. So do you have a good floor jack and a piece of chain and a place to work?
Awesome! If you do have extra springs I'd be happy to purchase them from you.
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
Joined
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1,244 Posts
I recently had a set made at Kansas Coil Spring Specialties, if I recall, there is a lot of information on here, but I think Rallye Bob had sent them NOS springs to go by, but they seemed confused as to having the spring specs when I contacted them. So I found some more information about the OE spring specs that Bob had posted, and they made them, I didn't want it much lower than factory, but they can make for any amount of lowering you want
Hey Keith, do you recall how much that pair of springs cost? Tnx
 

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Opeler
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259 Posts
If you don’t want to change springs you could install Chrysler ball joints in the front,works well . I think works well . I may have springs for you but we race so the spring rates may be too high. My daughter likes 700 lbs in the front
 

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I cut 2 1/2 coils so far out of 350# MustangII springs for the front. Haven't checked the spring rate yet, but I expect it to be upwards of 500#. Intention is to cut the stock front springs for the rear. Haven't got that far yet. Soon though. I want to establish final ride height.
 

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I cut 2 1/2 coils so far out of 350# MustangII springs for the front. Haven't checked the spring rate yet, but I expect it to be upwards of 500#. Intention is to cut the stock front springs for the rear. Haven't got that far yet. Soon though. I want to establish final ride height.
I’ve been doing that for years. Mustang 2 front springs cut to length. Starting spring rate and length obviously affect final rate.

For the rear, either cut-down stock front springs (street car), or cut-down stock rear springs (autocross or other race).

Stock Manta front spring rate is 135 lbs, linear in rate.

Stock Manta rear spring rate is progressive...113 lbs progressing to 180 lbs. This is due to the tapered spring wire. When you cut off the thinner wire ends the rate increases rapidly.
 

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This is all VERY GOOD info. I can add my $ .02 worth. I cut the front 1 1/2 coils incrementally (you can always cut more). The stance is great and the naturally stiffer springs were perfect.

The rears are from an Ascona wagon, again just cut enough to make the car level, I can’t remember how many coils. But as mentioned , the rear is super easy.

You’ll need an old school alignment shop because most shops now can’t enter it in there “computer “. The tech actually needs to know what they’re doing.
Heating them is good but you REALLY need to know what your doing.


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