Opel GT Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! Anybody out there have any idea how to buy a car from 2000 miles away without taking a big risk of getting ripped off. Say I see acar for sale in California that looks good in the ad and pictures, but don't want to send $3000 to a stranger without some protections. Any sugestions?
 

·
Senior Contributor
Joined
·
730 Posts
Could try a certified letter/check. If you know a lawer who could advise you. Talk to a bank rep. They have contacts. Ask the seller who is his/her bank and have your bank call.
 

·
70's Opeler, back 4 more!
Joined
·
398 Posts
I had the same situation when I got my last GT.

I sent the guy a $1000.00 check to hold it. Then when I showed up and drove it and agreed to pay for it, I paid him the rest. Now, we had several weeks of conversing through emails before we set up the meeting, so I was pretty comfortable with the situation.

You might try the same thing. Pay part now and the remainder on receipt of the car. I know most eBay transactions specify $500.00 deposit within a certain period and the remainder on pickup.

Good luck,
Chris
 

·
Pathologic Opeler
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
you need to see it

can someone physically see it and drive it for you.

photos are misleading too.

can someone from this site go there for you?

I bought my opel online..if I were to do it over ...I would ask one
of our club members to check it out for me.... car will not look
as good in person as online.

only the positive aspects are revealed ..never the negatives....

my 2 cents
 

·
Member
Joined
·
789 Posts
Jim's service is well worth the moneyas he knows Opels very well and buys and sells them more than anyone.
 

·
Old Opeler
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
Long Distance

Try 4,000 miles of Ocean - the Pacific Ocean at that!

I have dealt extensively with many Opelers both via EBay and person to person. I am happy to report a 99.5 sucess rate; from which I conclude that our community is particularly honest!

The one snafu has proved to be because of personal disaster and another I have put down to "lost in the mail" Not bad for 200 deals.

Some bits have proved to be only as good as the description but many have been even better. Some vendors have gone to extra ordinary lengths to ensure the safe shipment.

In all the shipping has proved to cost just about as much as the cost of the items themseves - so I am helping to put US Post into profit!

In conlusion: proceed cautiously, expect to loose one or two and be prepared to be pleasantly surprised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
It can be bad. Be Careful!

I've bought many things online in the past. Car, house, mortgage, computer, etc... While I have generally had good luck, my last big online purchase was the two 71 GTs I won on Ebay last October from a fella only 4 hours away! I thought I had asked all the right questions, and figured he had to be honest, he's close to home. But even with all that, what I call good and what others call good might be two different things. One car was defined as a parts car, the other was a driver. I specifically asked if they were me, would they trust the driver to go the four hours via Interstate to my house. I asked if it was roadworthy. They said yes. What I got was a car with expired tags, no seat belts, seats from some other car that were too high and forced me to bend my head to 40 degrees to see out the window, and were connected to the body with aluminum rivets! The battery was unhooked because the car was running it down. The "new" exhaust was a year old, was poorly installed, and cracked at multiple seams and was venting exhaust gas heavily into the car. All rubber bushings were shot, and the driveshaft had dented the undercarriage from it flopping around under the car. The "little" rust turned out to be blown out floorpans, body to suspension mounting points, etc... and the synchros for the tranny are in the bottom of the tranny. If you asked that guy, the new tires on the car were all I needed to have a roadworthy vehicle.

Scare you yet? I felt I had no choice but to pay. It was an auction, and I won the "as is" car. I was pissed, I lost another day and had to pay another $350 bucks to find a U-haul to tow this piece of car home. I'm sure if you ask this fella today, he'd argue that there was nothing wrong, but he knows he'd be lying. About the point where he recommended I not allow my daughter in the passenger seat on the way home gave that away. That and their great advice on how to evade and then explain to police if I were caught.

I say all that just to warn you. Buyer Beware, You can never be too careful, always wear clean underwear, etc... This won't stop me from shopping online, but I won't get burned again. I'll pass on the offer next time if time tries to force me to buy. I wish I had someone close to give me their opinion. I would pay for someone to look at the vehicle on my behalf if I were serious and not absolutely sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
I would definitely go for the offer from Jim. I just bought a GT long distance and there were some things that I found a little 'misrepresented' or perhaps an uninformed opinion/owner overlook. Unfortunately I am also dealing with a pure imbecility from the owner or whomever rebuilt the engine; crank is going to have to be removed and polished or ground, etc. Not a pleasant surprise. That's not a thing I could really check for or expect. If it's a rebuid I'd make sure it has some miles on it so that sort of thing will be discovered before you buy.
Sure do wish you good luck. Hope you get a real gem.
Ging
 

·
Opel fan
Joined
·
357 Posts
buying long distance

I bought a GT from a member on this site (Kristi) that was about a thousand miles away from me. It took a lot of emails and a lot of pictures plus a recent insurance evaluation to convince me it was all on the level. Some terms like "No Rust" are more descriptive than just a little rust. "Recent professional tune-up" has more meaning than just "runs good". Compression numbers are a nice thing to know before hand too. I got a good deal and was happy with what I got. When you are there yourself inspecting the car, check make sure the vins from title matches the vins on car, If there is no title as in the bank holding the title untill the loan is paid, use the vin on the registration to compare. Sometimes your better off passing on a car if the vins don't match and you don't know somebody on the "inside" or "in the know" to help. NJ DMV is wicked bad with red tape BS, Iowa DMV was really nice and co-operative with a problem I had due to Iowas error and they went out of there way to correct it. Phew! What a difference between those two states. Take Your time, use caution, If the seller belongs to a club like this one or even another, they have probably posted about their car there so ask about what clubs they belong to and what their name is on that site, and then do a little research. Good luck.
 

·
70's Opeler, back 4 more!
Joined
·
398 Posts
Jim brought up a great point.

Make sure the VIN on the paperwork matches the VIN Plate or Plates on the car.

Also, have them send you pictures that the VIN plates are actually attached to the car, either on the cowling or the dash. Preferably, both.

I know first hand, this will cost you starting around $500.00 to get the VIN and paperwork cleared up. It could be more.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top