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Über Genius
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, so I figure this needs it's own thread.

I would like input on a design for an Opel specific camshaft degree wheel.

Basically, the intent is to have a device, specific to the Opel camshaft, that allows for mapping the cam lobes, setting cam timing, etc.

Here is the design so far.



I also have plans for a companion piece, to be revealed later.

Any input is appreciated.

Circle
 

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After looking at the wheel wouldn't it help to include a ruff estimate of the
center lines.

I took the liberty to edit the wheel to include cyl. one center lines.
I'm not use to working with cam degrees only crankshaft.
Somehow my edit don't look right.. but what the hey.:)
Circle

PS the wheel needs a lighting bolt :yup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After looking at the wheel wouldn't it help to include a ruff estimate of the
center lines.

I took the liberty to edit the wheel to include cyl. one center lines.
I'm not use to working with cam degrees only crankshaft.
Somehow my edit don't look right.. but what the hey.:)
View attachment 89122
PS the wheel needs a lighting bolt :yup:
I knew something was missing. The BLITZ LOGO!

As for the center lines of the cylinder, on the cam timing I don't see how this matters. The wheel will check cam profile, not crank profile. And, I've extended the 45 degree marks to, sort of, accomplish this.


I am working on the companion piece. My hope is to have some of these off the press within two weeks. I don't see why that won't happen.

I will have enough made so everyone who needs one can get one.
 

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Über Genius
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Back to the drawing boar on the companion piece but here's a teaser pic



Auto part
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Another teaser

Well, this is the companion piece. I still need to trim one out and make sure everything is where it's supposed to be.

Can you all figure out what it is?

View attachment Untitled-1.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
rides above top of and around front cam sprocket timing gear to show dot when 1 is tdc compression stroke
Ding ding ding....
Sort of

It doesn't go over the timing gear. Just in front of. Can be used with or without the timing gear in place. You will be able to set cam timing on the bench or on the car.

There will be a rest for a pointer for both the dot and the center mark, whichever you use to set the timing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you going to tie this into the flywheel method?
Are you talking about lining up the ball and then setting the dot at 119.5mm from water neck side of the head?
 

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Getting Close

I still need to verify the center point of the cam in relation to the edge of the head but this is very close to the final design.



Technology Gadget Electronic device Space
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just an update.

I've been working long hours so I couldn't work on the wheel after work cuz there wasn't time. I was also taking time to make sure my measurements were on point. Once the die is made, it's made.

I also tested my prototype on a real time test so I would know, for sure, that it works. It was VERY helpful in getting the numbers for my cam timing.

I took time this weekend to prepare what I think is what's needed to make the die. I will hand it off to people who know more about these graphic programs than I do and get their input. If all is well I will have the die made this week (probably send it out on Tuesday).
 

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A quick update...

I finally got the die back from the die makers. It took almost two weeks for it to get from the graphics department to the die maker. Not acceptable.
And today I got the die, took a look and it was WRONG! So, it's back to the die makers with, hopefully, the right artwork.

I was not a happy camper today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have sent a few of these out and I haven't heard anything negative about them yet.

I guess that means they are available now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I need one! Please let us know how to send money to you. PayPal? I have 2 motors that need the cams timed.

Thanks,
Wes
I'm going to need to charge $10 each for the sets. I'd post my PayPal info here but the bots would spam me to no end so a simple PM would work. Just send me a message and I will send my PayPal address.

The set contains the timing wheel and the companion piece.

I will do a simple set of instructions soon and post them here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I would love to see your instruction for the degree kit. I received your kit, but need to know your procedure.

Thanks,
Wes
I'm working on the write up for it. I hope to get the basic done by this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A few people have asked for help in using this tool.

I agreed to do a small write up on how to use the cam timing degree wheel.

Although I can't imagine all the possible scenarios, or uses, for this degree wheel, I can say how I have used it and how I will use it.

So, here goes.



The first demonstration will be with no sprocket. I used it to check the newly ground cam I plan on using in one of my two engine builds currently underway.

I will use the following:

Cam
Two new valve lifters
Magnetic base dial indicator
Cam timing degree wheel
Companion piece
15mm head bolt that threads into the front of the cam
15mm ratchet socket.

First I lubed the cam and installed it in the head.
I inserted the bolt in the front of the head. I don't know the pitch of the bolt.
I installed the cam timing degree wheel on the cam. It's pretty self explanatory but look at the pictures if you need to.

Then I folded the companion piece (AKA pointer holder, PH). It's a real PIA to fold it because plastic doesn't fold well. I used a pair of pliers to help get the folds to stay. The scored edge is the best I could do with it but it seems to work good enough.
Next I put the PH on the front of the head. I lined up the holes with the valve cover bolt holes and lined up the edges of the PH with the edges of the head. I used some NdFeB magnets to hold it in place.

I used a piece of piano wire to make a pointer. You can use a nail or piece of coat hanger or some wire. Just make sure it's perfectly straight when sitting in the groove of the PH.



Then I lined up the #1TDC on the degree wheel. I noted that it was right because the red timing dot was lined up in it's proper place. (photo above)





I inserted two lifters on the #1 intake and exhaust lobes.

Next I lined up the dail indicator on #1 exhaust lifter. I used the intake/exhaust surface of the head to attach the magnetic base of the dial indicator.



Doing the best I could, I made sure the feeler in the dial indicator was EXACTLY in line with the profile of the lifter hole and sitting in the hollow of the lifter. This way, when the lifter rises it will push the feeler of the dial indicator straight, giving the truest possible reading.



It is important to note the following:

The cam timing degree wheel is divided into EIGHT segments. Green marks "before" TDC or BDC. Red indicates "after" TDC or BDC.

It's also important to know this:

The timing wheel rotates ONCE for a complete cycle. A complete ENGINE cycle is TDC, BDC, TDC, BDC. So when you rotate the cam once, the cylinder you are gauging will have TWO TDC's and TWO BDC's.

So, for ease of explanation, #1TDC is also indicated as #4TDC.

I will attempt to make a small cheater sheet.

#1 TDC = #4 TDC
#2 TDC = #3 TDC
#3 TDC = #2 TDC
#4 TDC = #1 TDC

And for BDC it works like this

#1 BDC = #3 & #2 TDC
#2 BDC = #1 & #4 TDC
#3 BDC = #4 & #1 TDC
#4 BDC = #2 & #3 TDC

I would suggest writing on the wheel to help you out. That's what I did.

OK, so that is the beginning of the basics of setting things up.

More in the next post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
To check the cam, line up the pointer on the dial indicator until it lines up with the ZERO mark. This is important as you will always return to zero for the measurement.



This is the baseline for testing.

Now, slowly rotate the camshaft clockwise and watch for the pointer to move. As soon as it moves, note the position on the cam degree wheel. Remember that the measurement will always be less than 45 degrees and either be BTDC, ATDC, BBDC, ABDC (B=before, A=after, TDC=top dead center, BDC=bottom dead center). Refer to the cheat sheet noted above.

Using the following picture we can see how this all works.



Although, from the picture, it's hard to tell if it's TDC or BDC, the measurement was BBDC (before bottom dead center). And since we are working on Cylinder #1, we know the exhast begins to open at 40 degrees BBDC.

You would also note the point at where the valve is fully open, The duration of the lobe, and the point where the valve is fully closed. You can also note the lobe height.

Use this data to compare each cylinder. This is especially useful if you are calculating the health of a used camshaft and lifters.

After you have completed the measurements for cylinder #1, move onto cylinder #2.




This is the basics of checking a cam with the head off of the engine, valves removed, no springs, etc. You will need to use your imagination to do other tests.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
For this part I will touch on the basics of the timing WITH the gear on.
You can do this during an install or just to check the slop in the chain of an aged engine.

The procedure will be about the same.

If doing this on a complete engine, you need to FIRST line up the timing ball on the flywheel as TDC. Look in a factory service manual if you don't know what this entails.

Everything beyond this point is the same.

First you need to have access to the timing gear bolts.
Remove them, and put the timing wheel in place and reinsert the timing gear bolts. DO NOT TIGHTEN THEM. You just need the bolts there to help keep the gear from coming off the camshaft during the testing.

When the timing wheel is in place it should look like this



It will help if you have a cam buttin to align the timing wheel but I didn't have one handy when I was taking pictures.

Next you will take a 15/64 drill bit (0r anything 15/64) and use it to align the hole of the cam timing wheel and the hole of the timing gear. This is to give the most precise results.



If done properly, you should see the following setup.



Note that the red line in the photo draws a line from the center of the cam through the red dot on the cam wheel and the cam dot. This is a proper alignment for cylinder #1 TDC on the compression stroke.


If the chain is not stretched, you should see the following alignment if the timing ball on the flywheel is lined up.



If the timing alignment is "in the green" then your chain is stretched. Green indicates a retarded timing. Red indicates advanced timing. You can note the number of degrees and adjust as necessary.

I hope this explains enough.
 

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MODERATOR'S NOTE: Thread cleaned up and moved and stuck to the Engine Rebuilding Forum. Nice work!
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
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Are these still being made? Pretty awesome tool, especially if you're try to adjust cam timing to be a little different than stock.
 
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