Opel GT Forum banner

Can anyone help me on Engine Problem?

  • Slow Take Off?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No Power from the Engine?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • What is that small Canister in fron with the Battery?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Why is my Seedometer going crazy?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Heeelp

Hi,
I just bought a 72' Opel GT with 67,000 miles. And this past weekend I changed the Oil, filter, Plugs & wires. But a new condenser and the swith thing inside the Distributor.
Now here is what I am left with, first the car does not have a good take off. It is very slugish and it barely moves. Why? Is this a problem with the Clutch? And the Speedometer gauge goes crazy. Does this mean it the tranny going?
Also there is a round canister next to the battery towards the front bumper, with a little rust hole. Can this be the problem? What is that canister for?
PLEASE help me......
HELP!!!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,077 Posts
Cuco,
Did you set the gap for the points (switch) correctly? It should be .015" (I think that's the setting, I've used a Pertronix Ignitor for several years now ) ;)

It it the Tachometer that is going "crazy"? If so it could be tied to a problem with the points gap.

The canister in the front is part of the emissions system.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,578 Posts
I'll take a shot at it.
Sounds like the points have closed up, and/or the timing is severely retarded (closed points will retard the timing, but you should check it after adjusting the points anyway). This will make the idle rpms low, and the acceleration VERY sluggish. Alternatively, check to be sure the brakes are free on the car, cars that have sat for a while can have hydraulics that are stuck, and they can drag the car down.

Sounds like the speedometer cable is binding. Try removing it and oiling the cable.... if that doesn't work, it'll need replacement. I like using low viscocity synthetic engine oil for the speedo cables, it flows well. Try Opel GT Source for a replacement cable if that is deemed the problem.

The cannister, as Gary said, if for emissions purposes. It is the charcoal cannister, a part of the evaporative emission controls. As long as it is not plugged solid, it will not affect the power/driveability of the car.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ok, But the Points on the plugs show to gap them at .030.. On the Hood of the car.? Is this not right?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,077 Posts
The Gap for the Plugs is .030. The points (Switch) you replaced inside the distributor also need to be gapped (spaced) correctly. as RallyBob mentioned if the point gap is too small, you will have the problems you describe.

Setting the points:

Remove the distributor cap and dust shield. (if one is there) Spin the engine over until the fiber block on the points is at the high point of the distributor cam. Using a flat feeler gage check the gap between the point contacts. (at the tip of the points) If it is not at .015, loosen the hold down screw slightly and open the gap by placing a screwdriver in the little slot along the edge and twist the screwdriver to increase the gap between the fixed and moveable point contact. once it is set, tighten the screw and recheck the gap.

Good luck!
 

·
Member
Joined
·
257 Posts
When I first purchased my Opel GT it was doing the same thing.
After checking everything and nothing was working I check the
enging compression. (low one each cylinder). I took the engine apart and found my problem. Over sized pistons, Standard size
rings.....Measure twice, hit with hammer once........

Thanks,
Stanley
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
HEELP

Thank You. I will try that tonight. Hopefully i can figure out the High Point that you mention.
But thatk you all for your help.
Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
CUCO-

Inside the distributor is a cam lobe - the points 'ride' on the cam, and open/close according to the amount of gap that you give them.

When you go to adjust them, pull the distributor cap and rotor, and have a friend crank the engine while you watch the action of the points. You'll quickly see the lobe and the points opening/closing as the motor cranks.

The 'trick' to setting point gap is to get the motor to stop with the point cam resting on the center of the lobe. This can be a real bugger - The motor wants to come to rest with point cam follower at the ramp of the cam lobe.

There are three ways to overcome this:

1) Pull the plugs and have a friend 'bump' the starter (short clicks) until the point cam is in position.

2) Pull the plugs, put the car in 4th gear (assuming you have a manual trans) and 'push' the car VERY SLOWLY until it lines up. This usually happens within 2-3 feet.

3) Put a wrench on the crank nut holding the accessory pulley in place, and use it to turn over the motor until it's in position.

I like to rely on the third method - don't have to move the car or rely on a buddy to get the job done.

Once you're in position, the point gap is set with a feeler gauge - Don't want to disagree with the grand masters of Opeldom, but I thought the gap was 0.016". I'll check the service manual later today. Be sure to use the little red plastic ampule on the lobe when you're done - that's point grease. It will prolong the maintenance of the gap by minimzing wear.

AFTER the points are set, you'll have to reset the timing. Even a teensy change in point gap has an effect on engine timing, so it's a good idea to check it after the fact. Don't remember factory settings of the top of my head, but can look them up.

As for the speedo - yep. Cable's hanging up. While the synth is a good idea, I've come to rely on a mix of white lithium grease and WD-40, both applied via aerosol cans. The trick is to disengage the speedo cable at the head (yeah, it's a bugger any way you do it) and alternate shooting short spurts down the cable. I start with WD-40 to penetrate, then shoot the grease afterwards. WD-40 penetrates; the white grease sticks with the cable a while.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
Points

If you don't have a feeler gage or you are stuck somewhere, the thickness of a credit card is just about right for point gap. It will at least get you home.

I use synthetic grease for the speedometer. The head of the grease gun can be fitted into the speedometer end of the cable, and a few pumps later... Almost anything will work for that lube though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Whew! what a night - didn't get home from work 'till nearly midnight.

My mind wasn't playing tricks - point gap is indeed 0.016".

Dwell angle (if you have a meter) is 50 degrees +/- 3 degrees. Like a 30 year old 150,000 mile motor will be that accurate - can you say ignition bounce?

Finish timing involves centering the timing mark in the timing window (a sight hole on the passenger side of the engine flywheel housing) whilst the motor idles at 900 RPM.

As for the credit card idea - I've heard that before. Unfortunately, credit cards mic out at 0.028 - 0.030" - about double whatcha need. If you're in a pinch, a business card folded over mics out at 0.018 - 0.022", on the average - it's still not spot-on, but much closer.

PLEASE let us know how it all works out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
HEELP

HEY!!
Wasssup Guys! Well I went straight Home last night and tried your ideas. And it worked I had a Gauge that only had .015 & .020 so I went with the .015, and the car turns right on and idles pretty good. The engine is a little shaky but it turns right on. As for the take off it is a lot better. Not 100%, so I have to see what else I have to do. I don't have the equipment to check the pressure. So maybe that I might have to spend some money and take it to a REAl mechanic, lol. This Weekend I will try the grease in the cable. Thank All of you...
 

·
Detritus Maximus
Joined
·
2,362 Posts
Re: HEELP

CUCO said:
HEY!!
Wasssup Guys! Well I went straight Home last night and tried your ideas. And it worked I had a Gauge that only had .015 & .020 so I went with the .015, and the car turns right on and idles pretty good. The engine is a little shaky but it turns right on. As for the take off it is a lot better. Not 100%, so I have to see what else I have to do. I don't have the equipment to check the pressure. So maybe that I might have to spend some money and take it to a REAl mechanic, lol. This Weekend I will try the grease in the cable. Thank All of you...
If you take it to a REAL mechanic, be sure to wear padded clothes. Everytime I show up with an Opel for them to work on, they chase me off with a stick!
Compression, fuel pressure, and vacuum gauges are relatively cheap. Spend the money on tools and do the easy stuff yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
loL

I understand what you are saying on the mechanics. But how do I even start doing the work? I have a manual that is barely holind together and I also have the Chilton. Is it something that is easy?

Also does anyone know someone that might have an extra Exhaust Manifold they want to sell or get rid of? I am actually looking for the complete Exhaust system....

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Yeah - it's pretty much that easy.

A real mech will run you off - I got a big kick outta the shop that balanced Maggie's wheels a little over a week ago. Told him the brakes were bad - don't bother checking them. His response?

'None of my guys would touch those brakes with a ten foot pole!'

The funny part? The front calipers are nearly identical (save for mounting bolts) to the calipers on the Catera! Mechanics are 80% parts swappers these days - and therein lies a story for some other time.

as for how easy it is:

My first Opel was a '73 GT purchased in '79. Belonged to a local TV anchor - kinda a Farah Fawcett lookalike. Got it home and began to do the look-thru; found cylinders 2&3 were low on compression and decided to do the rebuild. Wasn't all that hard - once I got past the fact I had to lift the car off the motor! With prectice, it's possible to pull an Opel motor in under an hour.

As for tools:

Go buy the following:

a) Multimeter - A ten buck radio shack multimeter is fine.
b) Compression gauge - Get the one that screws into the plug hole.
c) Vacuum Meter - the garden variety discount auto meter is okay.
d) Timing light - get the inductive pickup - if you want to get fancy, there's one with a timing index, but it's not needed.

With these four tools and help from the board, you'll be an expert in no time.

As for running rough...

After you get the timing and dwell right, the following may apply:

a) Vacuum leak. There's a connection just below the carb that has vacuum ports for the distributor and power brakes. These often get boogered up and leak; new vac hoses will do wonders. If it's leaking, it won't idle well, and there will be a hesitation off idle.

b) The Carb. There's nothing an Opel owner dislikes more about his Opel than the stock Solex carb. Most Opelers swap the stock Solex out with a Weber which greatly improves overall vehicle operation. I've not checked, but I'll bet there's at least 2-3 Weber threads on the site somewhere.

In the end - if you own an Opel, you'll soon be intimate with it.

You HAVE to be to keep it lit and running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Hey Chuck,
I was reading through your last response and I want to first thank you for you detail repsonse. I will go an purchase that stuff this weekend. As for the Carburator I do have the Weber in there. Now there is a hose that comes out of there that is connected to what I think is some kind of Choke? It looks like a black wire with a line that goes in and out of it, Something like the Gas cord onnect to the Carb. Do you know of this being the Choke. If not, What do you think it may be?
I do enjoy this Site. I think it is great how the board repsonses to problems that people are having.
Thnaks a Million.
Ed
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top