Opel GT Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I found a bunch of pics yesterday I haven’t seen in years, and thought it might be nice to put them in one place.

These are various items I’ve built for working on Opels. In theory making my work easier…

The first one is a chassis stand I built for my dad’s GT. It could also hold a Manta chassis in theory, though I never used it for that. Part of the design was the ability to drop an engine from a GT and roll the chassis away. The front crossbars are removeable. I sold this when I moved into my new shop due to a lack of space.
Motor vehicle Bumper Wood Vehicle Automotive tire

Triangle Wood Road surface Asphalt Rolling

Automotive parking light Tire Wheel Hood Vehicle

Yellow Triangle Wood Bicycle accessory Bicycle part
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Next up is the rotisserie I built in 1989 for a 1974-1975 Manta. The bumper mount holes are utilized for attachment.
Steel casing pipe Bicycle part Gas Cylinder Engineering
Crossfit Exercise machine Wood Gym Exercise equipment
Triangle Wood Flooring Musical instrument accessory Font
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle

Hood Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Bumper

Tire Car Wheel Vehicle Land vehicle
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Then there’s the chassis jig I built to allow structural repairs to be done, or rollcages to be welded without distorting the chassis. I made it in 2000 or so from some scrap I-beam I got.
Wood Rectangle Gas Road surface Machine

Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Window

Asphalt Road surface Gas Wood Machine

Wheel Tire Table Road surface Asphalt
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here is the new rotisserie I’m building. I needed a rotisserie for my Sportwagon, but my old one is currently on loan, so I figured I’d update and improve the design a little. I had 5 lengths of 3” x 3” x 3/16” square tubing, so I designed it around that. I also wanted a more positive method of locking the rotisserie in position.

I’m hoping I can build this rotisserie in the next week or so. Materials are all cut now and I have the casters too. I went with 6” diameter urethane casters. Just need to finish up a few other projects first.
Wood Rectangle Font Parallel Art
Wood Rectangle Font Handwriting Schematic
Automotive tire Wood Musical instrument Flooring Floor
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Engineering Automotive wheel system Gas
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I'd love a copy of the plans for this stand.
I built that over 30 years ago.
No doubt the design sketch is in one of these bins. Which bin…that’s the magic question.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Motor vehicle


If I stumble across it at some point I’ll let you know, but searching for a specific sheet or two of paper amongst all this stuff is not in my immediate plans!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’m lacking fabrication bay floor space due to having an immobile car in my shop. Waiting for parts to come in, which is still a few days away.

So I started putting together some of the smaller pieces for my new chassis rotisserie. This I can do on my welding bench in the meantime.
Automotive tire Gas Engineering Bicycle part Auto part
Automotive tire Patio heater Tire Rim Fender
Gas Auto part Serveware Metal Set tool
Wood Fixture Line Cylinder Household hardware
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nice and beefy! 👍
Massive overkill for an Opel.

My old rotisserie was made from 2” x 2” x .095” square tubing. It supported a full Manta body shell (including glass, interior, and suspension) minus the engine and gearbox for years.

I have no doubt this one would hold a complete car with driveline and then some.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
2 questions-

Are the front and rear bumper mounts same height?

How did you lift the chassis up to get it on the rotisserie?
The bumper mounts are essentially in the same plane, yes.

When I first put a car on the rotisserie I had access to a forklift. I put the entire car up, minus engine and gearbox.

Later on I used a 2-post lift when I purchased one in my old shop.

A bare-bones Manta shell (no glass, interior, doors, engine, suspension, etc) is very light. I can lift one end up by myself overhead. Two people can lift a shell off the ground with ease.

I don’t have a forklift or a 2-post lift in my new shop, so I will finish stripping down my Sportwagon and will just use my engine hoist and a couple of tie-down straps to cradle the shell, and lift it up high enough to slip the rotisserie stands onto the bumper mounts.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I’m gathering up the parts for my rotisserie locking mechanism.

I’ll use a spring-loaded 3/4” pin that slips into one of the 12 holes on the 3/8” metal discs I had water-jet cut.

I modified a piece of tubing as a receiver for the locking pin, complete with a guide slot in the tube and a threaded knob. I don’t have a mill to machine the slot, so I just drilled a few 3/8” holes and connected them by grinding with a carbide burr.
Bumper Wood Trigger Automotive exterior Gas
Bicycle part Rim Material property Office supplies Auto part
Wood Bumper Table Material property Automotive exterior
 
  • Like
Reactions: Young Gt Lover

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
The locking mechanism looks really nice, any reason you didn't go with a simpler pin in the rotating part like a engine stand?
Once built, it’s really quite simple.

Draw the handle back and sideways like the bolt of a rifle. No tools needed, no dropping or losing a loose pin. All self contained.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
A few more details on my new rotisserie.
Household hardware Gas Door handle Nickel Metal

Cosmetics Household hardware Tool Cylinder Nickel
Font Nickel Household hardware Screw Rectangle
Green Automotive tire Gas Machine tool Wood

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Wood Bumper Automotive exterior
Automotive tire Leg Wood Floor Flooring
Automotive tire Chair Wood Floor Thigh
Tire Bicycle wheel Crankset Bicycle tire Automotive tire

Wood Gas Flooring Physical fitness Automotive tire
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Tiny progress. Having trouble getting good welds. I’m not sure if it’s contaminants, bad shielding gas, the gas lens, or what.

I’m betting on contaminants since this is all old rusty steel. I’m pre-sanding down the areas I’m welding but I’m getting a lot of cratering. Which means grinding out the pits and craters and welding things over.sigh. Nothing is ever easy.

I changed out my gas lens and increased the argon flow rate from 20 cfh to 25 cfh and that seems to have calmed things down a bit.
Automotive tire Fender Automotive exterior Audio equipment Gas

Road surface Wood Automotive tire Asphalt Grey

Automotive tire Road surface Wood Asphalt Floor


Automotive tire Wood Exercise machine Flooring Automotive design
Automotive tire Exercise equipment Bicycle part Gym Gas
Automotive tire Wood Asphalt Road surface Mode of transport
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
There's a local metal supply shop that has a 'bargain barn' loaded with cutoff pieces. I'm going there this weekend to get enough metal to build the rotisserie.
What weight capacity do you think the casters should be rated for?
The casters I have are MASSIVELY overkill for an Opel. They’re rated at 600 lbs each, with 6” diameter urethane wheels. That works out to 2400 lbs capacity per rotisserie stand, or 4800 lbs total capacity for two stands. Seeing how the stripped body shell is about 500-600 lbs, I’m not stressing the casters at all!

I did this not for the load capacity, but for ease of rolling. The old casters on my first rotisserie were 3” phenolic wheels, rated at 250 lbs each. Being small diameter phenolic, a stray zip-tie on the ground would cause them to trip up, lol. Large urethane casters roll smoothly, and over small debris with ease.
 
  • Like
Reactions: soybean (R.I.P.)

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Looking at your original vs the new one, the new one looks more robust. The angled supports were angle iron, but are now box tubing. Was that more because it was the metal you had available or did you think it needed more support?
Exactly for this reason. I used what I had on hand. My first one I built from mostly 2” x 2” x .095” steel tubing.

The new one I built from 3” x 3” x .187” steel tubing because it’s what I have left over from a custom corporate meeting desk (21’ x 42’ long!) I built for my father’s company about 30 years ago.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
A'65 Caddy probably too wide. The stands would likely be alot taller.
Maybe…maybe not!

I did design it with Opel fender flare clearance in mind, plus an additional 6” per side.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mercougary

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I picked up a few 8 foot lengths of 2x2 steel. I got them at Logan Steel in Meriden, CT if anyone is ever looking for metal, they have a Bargain Barn full of cutoffs and misc metal pieces. You pay by the pound, great place.
They didn't have any pipe combination that would work for the rotating part. I was thinking, I have 2 old front wheel hubs from a late 90's ford explorer. Do you think that could be used for the rotating mechanism? They support at least 1000 pounds each in an unloaded Explorer. In my head it's similar loading geometry, think of the rotating Opel as the Explorer and the stands as the wheels.
I’ve never bought from Logan Steel though I’ve seen their billboards for years when I lived in CT. I was fortunate that where I lived in CT (Pleasant Valley in Litchfield County) I had a local welding supply/steel supply shop about a mile down the road from me.

I don’t see any reason why you can’t use front hubs/bearings for the spinner. The only down side might be the fact that it’s TOO spinny and it might be hard to control the body rotations.

Maybe keep the hydraulic brakes and a foot pedal to slow it down, lol.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Bob, could you elaborate on your rigging for picking the front of an early Manta/1900? I'm hesitant to use the protruding bumper brackets. They are puny.
I haven’t done an earlier Manta, but it would be similar to supporting a GT. Simply fabricate stronger bracketry. The guys in Europe do this all the time.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top