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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Budget Engine Swap

I have successfully completed the 60 degree V6-T5 conversion into my 1970 Opel GT. And at the ripe old age of 14 years old. And I did it for under 800 dollars. When I got my GT the motor in it was about to blow so I decided I wanted a different motor between my fenders. I got myself into about 10 months of fabricating and working on my car to get it to this point. I got the motor from a 84 Camaro from a U-Pull It junkyard. To keep the swap simple I chose a carburated motor. The transmission was from an 84 S-10. The motor and transmission together cost $350. The driver side foot box did in fact have to be cut flush with the steering to accomodate the exhaust. The first thing that was done was motor and transmission mounts were fabricated. The transmission mount was made from angle iron and the Opel automatic bolt holes were used. The rubber mount for the transmission was bought at a general parts store. The motor mounts were made out of old Chevy rear bumber mounts. A very modified opel crossmember was welded between the mounts to give the car added stability. New holes were drilled in the bumber mounts to line up with the opel bolt holes. Then once again some single bolt mounts were bought to cushion the engine. Oh, and the mounts that bolted on the motor were very modified S-10 motor mounts. Because my motor was from an 84 it had a distrubutor so had to be mounted about 2 inches farther forward than wanted so the shifter did hit the center console so it had to be cut. Now on to the exhaust. Custom exhaust manifolds were made by me and my dad. We took a flat piece of 1/8 in. steel and cut the exhaust pattern in it. Then three pieces of 1 1/2 in. exhaust pipe were welded straight out. Then another piece of exhaust pipe was welded perpendicular to the other three pieces. A few elbows were thrown on then a pair of cherry bombs and 2 in. exhaust pipe coming out the side. The driveshaft was cut by a local shop and cost only $40. The wiring of the engine was pretty much trial and error. A new S-10 clutch was bought. The end of the T5 clutch arm was cut off and the end from a ford clutch fork was welded on the end. That will enable you to use the stock opel clutch pedal and clutch cable. Then a bracket to hold the cable was fabricated. The day we fired up the engine to drive was not the most glorious. The motor fired up and I heard the loudest rod nock I have ever heard. We dropped the crossmember and oil pan and put a used bearing in to quiet it down a little but the crank was demolished. I have one question though. No matter what way we hook up the alternator it gets severly hot. Like hotter than the motor. Does anyone know what that could be? Look at the pictures below. Look in the photo gallery. My GT is in there and my brothers Chevelle.http://www.wegmanracingteam.ontheinter.net/
 

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It sounds like you have a loaded short on the alt/batt circuit. Check out the internal diodes, then start ohming the + wires. As far as the engine, I'm suprised you didn't run the motor first. But then, no worst than most of us starting out. I did the same with a 60 Falcon and a 289 back when I was growin up in S. Jersey. Question. Did you and your dad think about cupping the firewall to make room for the dist?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll check out the alternator and see if that is the problem. As for the engine, I actually did start it in the back of a pickup truck on jackstands but it had no exhaust so that's probably why we didn't hear the rod knock, then again we started the engine in the car with just the exhaust manifolds and we could hear the knock clears as day. So I don't know. That would be a good idea to cup out the firewall but we weren't sure what was behind the part of the dash so we decided not to fool with the firewall.
 

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why was the camero at the Junk yard? was it wrecked? do you think it could have been there because of the engine situation?
 

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I agree with Gary. I like the little V6's from GM except for the Rodchester carbs (they suck). It's that or the Chrysler 3.3 I plan on using for my 71GT. I need to measure, but the 3.3 looks alittle thinner. But for a inch, I'd go with the GM.
 

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Yet another V6 opel!!!

I'm currently working on the same swap except using an '82 engine. I haven't decided on the exhaust yet, but I'm considering taking the path that you did, or use the exhaust from a fiero.

I'm pretty certain that I'm going to at least have to modify the engine cross member. If not replace it all together. I would be very interested in mounting of the engine that you did. Do you have any more detailed pictures of the cross member, and the engine mounts, I have my ideas about how I'd like to do them, but I'm always open to other ideas.

Also, the engine came with an autotrans, and I'll go ahead and put it in, but will probably switch to a standard trans. however I was wondering what the distance is from the front of the bell housing to the center of the shifter for the T5. so that I can plan for it when installing the engine. I'm taking lots of pictures along the way and I'll be starting a webpage before too long with the project. At this point, I just installed a vacuum advance distributor and saw spark at the plugs. It actually took quite a while to get there. Hopefully I'll get he engine to turn over on it's own in the next week or two.
 

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ok i dont blame you for using a 3.3 liter chrysler v6 but which one?
they have two diff styles
first is in the caravans and the other is in the intrepids and concordes and such the caravan one is a 60 v6 i think and the intrepid one is close too a 45 degree
also you would have to adapt a transmission to it because there are no rwd models with the same bolt pattern
also there is a front and rear water plumbing for the engine
and last i havent seen any ots performance parts if you want to just have a reliable motor it will be fine other than that i dk

the gm 60 v6 is a better choice in my opinion
first gm loyalty
but there r rwd versions
plenty of performance parts (even better carbs) cheaper parts
and you know it has been done and has been successful so that will make it easy
 

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Same subject I've already got a 96 Camaro 3.4 and a 92 S-10 T-5 all bolted together, but I had to use an 88 bellhousing, the one on the tranny was busted in transit and I can't use the hydraulic system. I made new crossmembers for the engine/tranny. Both mimic the original subframes and use the original bolt holes. The tranny mount uses an S-10 rubber mount and bolts right in, the crossmember had to be dropped 1 1/2 inches to equate the original angle to the drive shaft. The engine mounts are boxed 1/4" plate steel welded together on all four sides, the crossmember is made up to fit the original holes and needed to be modified twice, only because I screwed up on the original measurements. The total assembly has been in the car and bolted up using the tranny mounts but the front of the engine is about 3 inches right of center, I need to know how much of the footwell needs to be removed so I can center the engine in the bay. I don't want to take out too much or not enough. BTW, using the SFI engine, the air plenum hits the wiper motor well and will have to trimmed also. I have drawings and pics of the main engine crossmember if any one is interested in using the original bolt holes.

Ron
 

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Ron,


I know you asked me for some pics of the firewall cutout as well as the wiper cowl- I plan on taking some digital pics this eve and putting them on the web so they can be downloaded. The only issue is that my motor is out of the car, so the pics will lose some perspective as to why I trimmed what I did.

I'll give you a heads up when they are done. However, I recommend that you get your engine in and use whatever exhaust manifolds you plan to use and base the cuts on those instead of just cutting in the same place that I did. You might not have to take off as much. My engine is set further back than yours I believe and that is a significant factor for how much you have to trim


-Nathan
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
as for the footwell, even with my custom exhaust manifolds, i had to cut about 2 1/2-3 in. out of it or i cut mine flush with the steering column. Patching up the hole was harder for me. This German metal is a pain in the butt to arc weld on. It just burns wholes right through it. I actually caught the foam that is under the carpet on fire (not funny). So I tacked it in a few places and then said the heck with it and just put body filler over it to make it nice and smooth. I'll tell you, i think the hardest part of this swap was either the exhaust or the gas pedal. I'll try to get picks of all the fabrication when I take the motor out to put a new crank in it. I'll get some picks of the motor in too. I think this is definetly the way to go for an engine swap. With a huge rod knock and a stock motor. My dad floored it and it smoked the tire all the way through 2nd gear. And you can get some awesome aftermarket parts for this motor. Such as a roots type Supercharger from Fageol Superchargers. Get a nice cam up in there, some forged slugs, some ported big valve heads, a supercharger and you should be able to hit about 350+ hp. Now if you could get this to hook up it would be awesome.
 

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Nathan, thanx for the response. My plan is to do what you suggest, but I would like to have some reference marks to see how close we are. The other problem I have is the guy building the exhaust wants the engine in the hole to do his measuring for headers. A catch 22 problem, so I have to fit the engine in first for a preliminary check for him. Right now with the tranny bolted in to the mount, the engine is 3 inches right of center, so I'll have to remove enough sheetmetal to cure that and the intake plenum hits the wiper well, so that will have to be addressed. I was thinking about using a set of S-10 headers I got off e-bay. The flanges on them are 90 degrees off the 3.4, so cutting them and rewelding should be no problem, if I can get them to work in the allowed space. I got a set of Fiero headers and they are trashed, cracks all over the place. I may have to use them though or something similar, because of the twin oxy sensors and the 3-stage EGR valve the computer needs. The left side exhaust looks like I can use standard type headers just behind the oil filter, but if I have to use a log manifold on the right side, I'll do them both the same for aesthetic appeal. The fun never ends. The lady of the house has decided she wants the GT painted silver, she saw one at the OMC picnic and thought it looked great. If I decide to go that route, the whole car will be stripped and painted POR-15 glossy black inside and under and silver on the outside. And she doesn't think the original white upholstery will look quite right with the silver paint so it will have to be a black interior. Glad I'll have air-conditioning in this.

Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
another question about the alternator! even though it gets extremely hot, it isn't bad. the motor does not run on the battery and the batter doesn't go dead so any suggestions would be helpful. maybe those alternators just run really hot. ???????!!!!!
 

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wegmanracing said:
another question about the alternator! even though it gets extremely hot, it isn't bad. the motor does not run on the battery and the batter doesn't go dead so any suggestions would be helpful. maybe those alternators just run really hot. ???????!!!!!
Where this ever go? BTW.. alternators do get hot.. but not usually hotter than the motor.

Disconnect the negative battery cable and put a test light between it and the body of the car. If the light comes on.. you have a short in the harness. Seeing that this thread is almost 2 years old I guess your probably either done with this project or its dead.

Charles
 

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Gary said:
The 60° V6's are the easiest fit for the GM sixers. The 4.3 90° V6 adds too much weight and requires more cutting.
guess whats a 60° V :D
 

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baz said:
guess whats a 60° V :D
That wouldn't be an all Aluminum 60 degree V-8 out of a Land Rover by chance?
 

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I'll take a wild guess and say its the 60 deg V-12 out of a jag
 
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