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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking for an applicable electric fuel pump and came across this:

http://www.cbperformance.com/catalog.asp?ProductID=577

It's a rotary design so it should be quite, it's output pressure is 3.5 psi which should be OK for the 1.9L engine w/Weber. It comes with a filter and all at a very decent price. Has anyone ever used this pump before? Comments appreciated, thanks.
 

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it's rated for "uninterrupted fuel pressure at up to 30 gallons per hour"
That seems like more than enough capacity, doesn't it?
 

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Perfect fuel pressure, and certainly more than enough fuel volume for a street engine. Let us know how it works out if you purchase one, particularly the noise level. It also seems very fairly priced.

Bob
 

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Fuel Pump

I installed an electric fuel pump and finished using the original (a new one). Seems to be more convenient.
But the electric pump provides a better start, since the pressure is always positive. Presently, I have no use for the new electric pump.
It is a matter of preferences.
 

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at autozone they have an alternative electric fuel pump for the opel it was $31 and it works great it even has a strainer on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Finally installed the electric fuel pump I picked up a while ago, my mechanical pump started leaking. Pretty easy installation. I added a fuel cutoff valve to make changing the filter easier in the future. Cutoff valves are common on motorcycles since you frequently have to take the tank off.

I hooked up a relay to provide "+12 volts @ cranking" when there is no oil pressure to fill up the carb bowl and help get the engine started. Once started and oil pressure is up, the relay contacts change state and provide "+12 volts switched" but only as long as the oil pressure idiot light is "OFF". If the low oil pressure idiot light comes "ON" the relay drops out and turns the fuel pump off. Basically an oil pressure safety switch, but I just used a Radio Shack relay and the signals the Opel GT electrical system already provides. Trying to get to the oil pressure sending unit to install one of those mechanical oil pressure safety switches looked like no fun!

The engine fires up quicker now. The pump is pretty quiet, as long as you mechanically insulate it from the car body. I used a shock absorber bushing as a mounting point and a thick rubber strip cut from an old automobile inner tube between the pump itself and the mounting clamp. Took the car for a 2 hour highway spin today, all seems fine. I didn't make any pressure or volume measurments but the car runs great. Another happy camper.
 

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I'm thinking about making this mod to my '73 GT. Mine has a fuel filter before the carb with an additional line for vapor return. Not sure if that's stock or not.

The electric pump I'm looking at (I think it's the same as Jimsky's, but from Kragen) has a filter w/o vapor return before the pump. Do you keep the filter at the carb and the vapor return line? If not, what, if anything, do you do with the vapor return line? TIA
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I left everything "as is"; just got rid of mechanical pump, bolted up the block off plate and installed the electric pump. I still have all the tank vent lines, charcoal canister and carb bowl vent line. I got rid of the OEM metal can filter by the old mechanical pump since I now have a metal can filter back by the gas tank. I did install a second small chrome/glass filter right near the carb. Bit of extra protection and allows a simple visual check for fuel flow.
 

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Jimsky, I know this is going to sound stupid, but in your 8/13/03 picture of the fuel pump and filter how did you mount the pump? I see the strap holding the hose is tapped into the frame. Mine came with a bolt and strap, but I can't figure out how to get my hand in to hold the nut with a wrench. The shelf is out and I crawled back there and can't see squat. I pulled the tail lights out and still couldn't see. I had thought about using a self tapping bolt, but I couldn't tell how much clearance there was between the body and tank. With my luck I'd drill into the bottom of the tank, and I'm too close to cranking it up, (just need to rebuild carb) to chance it. Thanks, Jarrell
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The electric fuel pump was mounted using a hose clamp to attach it to a metal "strap" that was tack welded to the body. The strap is about 3/4" to 1" wide, tack welded in the center of it's 3" or so length so the two ends can be folded over each other. I think it was used to hold a fuel line in place.

I used a shock absorber bushing to isolate the pump from the car body to prevent it from buzzing on the car body. In addition I wrapped the pump in a layer or two of rubber cut from a bicycle inner tube, for more isolation. Assembled the bits, placed the hose clamp around all of it, folded the metal body strap to make a captive mounting point and tightened up the hose clamp. Secure mount, no buzzing or vibration. I didn't drill any holes or use any nut/bolts...it worked out fine.

Jimsky
 

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Thanks Jimsky, I'll give it a try Monday when I can get my hands on a welder. Jarrell
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
FYI, I didn't weld anything. I just used the metal strap that was already there (stock body fixings). Like I said, I think it was there for holding the fuel line up nice and neat next to the body.

Jimsky
 

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I used pretty much the same pump, I got it from autozone and it was over 50 bucks. A Master name brand part #E8012S. I used a large self tapping screw and the hardware that came with it. I like it and I have to listen for it since it's so quiet.
 

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jimsky said:
FYI, I didn't weld anything. I just used the metal strap that was already there (stock body fixings). Like I said, I think it was there for holding the fuel line up nice and neat next to the body.

Jimsky
Sorry Jimsky, I saw the strap later after my post, and realized that was what you had ment. My brain was on pause. Thanks all. Jarrell
 

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I recommend using nuts/bolts and rubber washers to isolation pump vibrations from the body pan. Sheet metal screws will transfer this noise. Also, some sort of a sleeve for the bolt would be best, but hey...

Also, now's a good time to run the electrical supply for the fuel pump from one of the factory dash switches. This means a potential thief can start the car and drive it a block until the carb bowl runs dry and the car stalls out. (little hint from your uncle keith)
 

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Thank You Jimsky for including your description of the relay cutting off the pump when there is no oil pressure. This is an absolute must, big time mandatory in racing especially!! Everybody please pay attention before trying this at home. Think of the horrors of the fuel pump running, putting out 3 to 7 psi at 30 gallons per minute in those first moments after a bad car crash. Fire is bad. Bad fire is real bad. Real bad fire is never mind, you get the picture. A simple relay is all it takes. Do It!!
 

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relay # or wiring diagram

[QUOTE=jimsky
I hooked up a relay to provide "+12 volts @ cranking" when there is no oil pressure to fill up the carb bowl and help get the engine started. Once started and oil pressure is up, the relay contacts change state and provide "+12 volts switched" but only as long as the oil pressure idiot light is "OFF". If the low oil pressure idiot light comes "ON" the relay drops out and turns the fuel pump off.

i like the idea, what radio shack relay will change states as you describe?
thanks
 
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