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Hi everyone, Ive seen this mentioned a few times in the forums, and my searching on the web has turned up mixed opinions. How does everyone feel about engine coatings are they 'worth the money' (for a killer street engine). What parts do you recommend being coated? Do they really extend part life 2-10 times like some sites state?!?! What are the best companies to order from, techlinecoatings and swain tech ive seen mentioned.
 

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I do like piston coatings, FWIW, the thermal barriers help keep the heat away from the rings. I've also found that with forged pistons you can run tighter bore tolerances since they don't expand as much. The skirts also scuff less with the low friction coatings.
 

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I do like piston coatings, FWIW, the thermal barriers help keep the heat away from the rings. I've also found that with forged pistons you can run tighter bore tolerances since they don't expand as much. The skirts also scuff less with the low friction coatings.

Bob,

I know this thread is a bit old, but do you feel piston coatings are worth while. If you had to do one which one might it be. Now I know these are open ended questions and I haven't given specifics, engine duty requirements, ... I know a turbo engine would have a different answer than for a street engine...

So this is for a mild performance street engine, flat tops, head milled .025, block to be decked ~.005 -.010, mild cam(OR-66), 1.72/1.5...... I'm looking for noticable improvements in economy and power. As in less friction, better utilization of heat of combustion and etc.

I would love your thoughts on this.....
 

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Bob,

I know this thread is a bit old, but do you feel piston coatings are worth while. If you had to do one which one might it be. Now I know these are open ended questions and I haven't given specifics, engine duty requirements, ... I know a turbo engine would have a different answer than for a street engine...

So this is for a mild performance street engine, flat tops, head milled .025, block to be decked ~.005 -.010, mild cam(OR-66), 1.72/1.5...... I'm looking for noticable improvements in economy and power. As in less friction, better utilization of heat of combustion and etc.

I would love your thoughts on this.....
I probably wouldn't bother with that engine spec. With significantly higher compression or with forced induction, yes.
You'd get more power and just as much economy out of a good two hour dyno session, so that's probably a better place to spend your money.

I'm coating 'everything' in my turbo Manta engine only because it has to handle 300+ hp for 25 minutes continuously. A bit different scenario than even a super high po street engine!
 

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When you have done everything possible to scrounge the last tenth of a horsepower out of your engine, these fancy coatings prove to get you that last little bit of oomph, reportedly up to a few hp. I've researched this to no end, and am convinced there is something to it. Cost-wise, well, when you've spared no expense up to that point, what's another couple hundred dollars?
Your engine as described should be exactly what you wanted, noticeable improvement in power, anyway. Economy depends on how much you enjoy your new power...
You'll want to use synthetic oil, that's the new rage in reduced friction which is also increased power and economy. I'm a total believer in it.
What's really interesting, and new to me, is the new technology in coatings for the piston rings. One for the face, another for the top and bottom. See 'em at the Total Seal website.
Since I brought up Total Seal, if you want to study increased power, look at gapless rings. So far I can only tell you that a set of them only costs $159 delivered. Unfortunately the 1.9 bore is smaller than those they make the really ultimate trick rings for, but the Advanced Performance line is better than nothing.
 

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Actually, I was only considering having the bearing and piston skirts coated. This would cost ~$126 plus shipping, from Swain. My guess this would be the best long term bang for the buck, when evaluating improvments in ecomony and increased service life of the pistons and bearings.

When the new engine gets broken in, it will be swithced over the M-1. The Manta already enjoys the extra efficiency of synthetic oils in the engine, tranny and rear end.

The Manta was built with gapless #2 rings and the GT will have them too.

General Question: If some of the coatings are so good, why would their application be the LAST in a series of modifications instead of the First? I'm talking about the basic application not some of the extreme examples of some of the parts that might be coated like the exterior of the oil pan, the bottom of the mainfold or a timing chain gear......

For example: reduction of valve train friction.... cost vs benefit... (Opt 1) roller cam and roller rockers. (Opt 2) Dry film coating applied to cam, lifters and valves tips. The cost the coat the valve train would probably be cheaper than the roller rockers and roller lifters.... Just a thought.....
 

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General Question: If some of the coatings are so good, why would their application be the LAST in a series of modifications instead of the First? I'm talking about the basic application not some of the extreme examples of some of the parts that might be coated like the exterior of the oil pan, the bottom of the mainfold or a timing chain gear......
You'd probably be surprised at how many OEM's are using coatings in new engines. My 16 year old Nissan crapbox Sentra has factory coated pistons and the oil pan has a weird coating that took a chemical strip AND sandblasting to remove (I was making a deeper sump). Fairly common these days, as the CAFE standards must still be met, yet cars are getting more powerful and heavier by the minute. Coatings help to reduce friction to get that 1/2 mpg improvement (or whatever %) which saves the OEM's millions in CAFE fines from the federal government.

For example: reduction of valve train friction.... cost vs benefit... (Opt 1) roller cam and roller rockers. (Opt 2) Dry film coating applied to cam, lifters and valves tips. The cost the coat the valve train would probably be cheaper than the roller rockers and roller lifters.... Just a thought.....
To me, the next best thing to the roller rockers (worth 4-6 hp BTW) will be an REM treatment and preferably a micro-blue/REM combined treatment. The stuff is awesome, I read about them years ago and saw them at the PRI show in Orlando last year. The friction reduction is amazing, and they can do cranks, rockers, lifters, cams, axle bearings, wheel bearings, differential parts, transmission internals, etc.

A friend of mine road races a 2.5 RS Subaru, and eats front wheel bearings (about three events before the grease literally melts out from the temps). He had as set of new front wheel bearings 'micro-blued', and he has 4 races on them and they are still perfect. Worth every penny IMO. No more DNF's from seized wheel bearings for him.

Bob
 

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Since I brought up Total Seal, if you want to study increased power, look at gapless rings. So far I can only tell you that a set of them only costs $159 delivered.
Jeff,
As an FYI, I sent in my #2 rings and they modified them to make them gapless. Pricing at the time, $8 set-up charge and an $8 per ring cutting fee. Seemed like just the ticket to improve oil control and limit combustion by products from contaminating the oil and reducing life of the oil.
 
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