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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:confused: I am looking at a nicely restored 1970 GT 1900. The engine runs well but is not original to the restored car. It is four cylinder and the number on it is "19S 0953872". The "7" may be a "1". Can anyone help identify whether this is a 1.9 or 1.1 liter engine for me? Thanks. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Engine Identification 19S

After reading on through some threads my slow, dimwitted brain somehow latched onto the idea that "19S" may actually correspond to "1.9 liter engine"

How is my thinking on this? Being an automotive engineer, this makes perfect sense, but then again, I have seen thousands of part numbers that make no sense at all through the years:rolleyes: Thanks.
 

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*s Before and after...

If there are Asterisks * before and after this ID number, does that indeed represent a high compression 1.9? I have a 72 GT and always assumed it had original motor, low compression based on the model year.

Thanks, Mark
 

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please correct me if I'm wrong but so far there has been one rebuilt motor with the asterics that wasn't a high compression. All the rest have been proven to be if they were stock.
 

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i have two low compression engines with asteriks before and after the engine number
 

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Can you tell me about this engine?

I have a 71 gt that I'm restoring. I figured it was a 7.6:1 compression because it is a 71 however, the engine block reads *19S 0647673*. From what I've read this means the engine is the higher compression 11:1 which would be great because this is the engine I want. Could someone tell me if this is right, along with any other information you can tell from the block number. Thanks alot!!
 

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the higher compression engines are only rated for 9:1 from the factory, and are overrated from the factory still. they never came stock in 11:1 form, altho venolias are probably what your thinking of.

its easy to tell if you just put any cylinder at TDC, pull the sparkplug, and shine a little penlight or something in there. you'll see a halfcircled dish taken out of the piston, or 2 valve reliefs with a flat top.
 

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nobody said:
please correct me if I'm wrong but so far there has been one rebuilt motor with the asterics that wasn't a high compression. All the rest have been proven to be if they were stock.
i have a low compression motor with the asterics, it was rebuilt, but i looked at the pistons before the engine was ever cranked over and they still have carbon on top... so i don't believe the pistons were changed since i have most of the parts from the other engine the guy who rebuilt it had and it has low compression pistons too...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
INteresting Note on block color

The 1.9 liter engine in the 1970 GT 1900 is yellow in color with some rust spots - but I would assume this is probably not the best indicator out there of engine size/compression ratio/etc since the block could always be repainted.
 

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OpelLarry said:
Where can I find a key to engine color codes? They weren't all semi-gloss black were they?
As far as I know all the Opel engines were painted black, I've never seen an original one in an other color

The engines in the US are all the S type engines [= high compression], as said the later models have a reduced compression due to US emission laws that's why you have two different typs of compression with an "S" engine
 

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The only difference I've seen is the early Kadett engines (1.5, 1.9) were actually dark grey. I guess technically it's shade of black, but there's a noticeable contrast on a Kadett engine vs. other models. Perhaps due to the assembly plant or something....

Bob
 
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