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Now this was taken from the internet. [Quote: analysts predict the 2019 corn yield will be 13.36 billion bushels compared to 14.42 billion in 2018, while the soybean yield will be 3.658 billion bushels compared to 4.543 billion bushels in 2018.
It would be the lowest corn yield since 2012, a year of significant drought that saw corn production numbers fall to 10.76 billion bushels. Also, it would be the smallest soybean yield since 2013 (3.357 billion bushels).] End Quote
As a retired Farmer, I pay attention to what is planted around me. Corn has not been planted around me, what has, looks pitiful, due to lack of rain. From what I have gathered, the Midwest and major corn producing areas were underwater during planting season, so where is this corn coming from? Just my curiosity here.:confused: Jarrell
 

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Who can you really trust now a days :confused:
Dan
Now you have posed the million dollar question. When I was farming soybeans hit 14.25/ bu. Now you're lucky to get 7 to 8 dollars / bu. And the news is full of Farmers in the midwest "harming themselves" not being blunt. I know who I blame, but this is not Spacebook, and I will not bring drama to this Forum. Jarrell
 

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Now this was taken from the internet. [Quote: analysts predict the 2019 corn yield will be 13.36 billion bushels compared to 14.42 billion in 2018, while the soybean yield will be 3.658 billion bushels compared to 4.543 billion bushels in 2018.
It would be the lowest corn yield since 2012, a year of significant drought that saw corn production numbers fall to 10.76 billion bushels. Also, it would be the smallest soybean yield since 2013 (3.357 billion bushels).] End Quote
As a retired Farmer, I pay attention to what is planted around me. Corn has not been planted around me, what has, looks pitiful, due to lack of rain. From what I have gathered, the Midwest and major corn producing areas were underwater during planting season, so where is this corn coming from? Just my curiosity here.:confused: Jarrell
I spent a lot of time in Kansas when I was getting older (I still haven't grown up), but I am NOT a farmer. I do know that I did a lot of driving through Kansas and Nebraska in July (looking for my ancestors graves, homes, etc). From the southern border of Kansas almost all the way to the northern border of Nebraska and from the Iowa/Nebraska border (Omaha to Sioux City) then west to Grand Island & Kearney, fields were under water (I'm talking about up to 2 feet deep), rivers which I used to walk across would sweep you away, and INTERSTATE HIGHWAYS were closed/diverted. The lake in Manhattan, KS (my old home) was less than a foot from overflowing and the residents in low areas down stream were told to get any good stuff out of their basements (and maybe 1st floor areas). They couldn't release the water as there was flooding already downriver and this would only make it worse (but no one was saying what would happen locally if they didn't release). Remembner when "corn" was food? Good thing we don't get eat it now as we couldn't fuel all of our cars! But there is some fun left out there, I saw a photo the other day of an electric car (NOT a hybrid) being recharged at a "fueling station". Big deal you say? Well this "station" was powered by a large diesel generator! Laughed so hard that i nearly wet my pants!
 
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