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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am losing some grease from the back of the spindle/rotor-Wondering if this blue seal has gone bad or if I am missing a seal. Or am I just packing too much grease, or is this just the way that it is. The grease does not go far but it is coming out of the back of the rotor. I have removed the excess grease in this picture however the grease does not travel beyond the flange, that is it does not make its way to the black surface. Thanks. Carl
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The seal should be pressed into the hub itself. It won’t stay put if there’s grease inside the hub at the point where the seals resides. It’ll keep popping out.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The seal should be pressed into the hub itself. It won’t stay put if there’s grease inside the hub at the point where the seals resides. It’ll keep popping out.
Thanks Bob, However could you clarify for me - if I follow you - so I need to remove the blue seal and secure it to the hub/rotor and then place it back on the spindle to ensure a proper seal/fit? Thanks, Carl
 

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Thanks Bob, However could you clarify for me - if I follow you - so I need to remove the blue seal and secure it to the hub/rotor and then place it back on the spindle to ensure a proper seal/fit? Thanks, Carl
That’s correct. No grease on the OD of the seal, just the ID where it contacts the spindle.
 

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This is a front hub inner seal, not a "Rear brake rotor rear seal", and it relates to the suspension, not the brakes. Thread moved and re-named
 

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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks to everyone for your responses, I always appreciate the time a member takes to try and help me be a better back yard machanic, I have come a long way but still a ways to go, "the more you know the more you realize you don't know". Every-time I open a can of worms I learn about something else besides worms, which is a good thing. I have received a lot of information on my initial question and learned that my terminologically was incorrect and my post has been moved to the proper category - which of course is a good thing - I continue to learn. However with that said, and having no practical experience with this seal and I hate to say it, but I am having a problem, the problem is - I understand my question but don't understand the collective responses, except for Keith, that was straight forward and I have no questions regarding that response. Part of the problem is that I think I understand what the problem is but the answers that I have received have not made the picture clear. I need more information to understand the problem and how to fix it.
Here is what I know and what I think - there is a blue seal, this I know, the front inner seal that as far as I know is in good condition, it is however a 50 year old seal. I included the second picture of the back of the rotor as I thought perhaps I was missing another piece of the seal or even missing another seal. I would appreciate a more detailed response so when I put this rotor back together it will be for the last time for the foreseeable future. . Keep in mind that the blue seal was pretty much not visible due to the grease covering it in a large quantity - again the grease did not migrate past that area on to the black area so it is not a major problem just seems that the grease should not be building up over the blue seal in massive amounts. As stated before I did pack the hub very full of grease, not sure that is completely necessary and could that be the problem. Many thanks again for your responses past and future. Best, Carl
 

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I’ll take a shot at it Carl, the blue inner seal in the picture came off from the rotor. If the grease is a little excessive it will cause the inner & outer seals to pop off. I usually pack the bearings really good, keep squishing and rotating in your hands for at least 5 minutes, this part you can’t overdo. Clean the excessive grease off the outside of the rotor the cavity will be packed with grease, it won’t hurt to remove a little that’s fine, what’s critical is the job done packing the bearings. Install the rear bearing.

At this point, did you replace the bearings, especially the outer race? Be sure that it’s seated properly if so. Remove the blue inner seal from where it is in the picture and clean the grease up. Install the inside bearing into the rotor then tap around the blue inner bearing seal as you install it in the inside of the rotor hub. It should seal snugly as you install it if it’s the right part. Install the outer bearing and slide it in the spindle. Tighten the castle nut to specs back it off according to specs (I can’t remember the torque value). The outer seals/caps are the ones I always have a hard time with, air pockets always build up underneath it and sometimes I even have to use an adhesive on them because one of them keeps popping off. I hope I’m not missing anything if so feel free to post back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK Its all coming together....I removed the blue seal from the back of the spindle and cleaned up all the excessive grease.

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I then repacked the bearing and installed the blue seal which fit very tightly on to the back of the rotor, over/on top of the bearings. In retrospect I believe this seal is only 3000 miles old. The rotor now goes back onto the spindle. I am assuming there are no other parts involved - I will also fill that depresson in the blue seal/bearing with a little more grease. Now that I have gone through that exercise I recall mounting that seal on the back of the rotor 20 some years ago however I have taken the rotor off multiple time over the past couple of years and the seal was always disloged and I just assumed that was the way it was supposed to be. Both the front and rear bearings are 3000 miles old. Considering the way this all fits together I am at a loss to understand how it can come off of the rotor, considering the tight fit and stick to the back of the spindle housing as shown in an earlier picture. Bob did say they can pop off and well that appears to be the case. Thanks for solving my mystery everyone. Carl
Cub, can you further clarify the following sentence, "The outer seals/caps are the ones I always have a hard time with, air pockets always build up underneath it and sometimes I even have to use an adhesive on them because one of them keeps popping off." ???? Above we were talking about the inner seal, what are the outer seal/caps. Outer bearing, then large metal washer that fits one way, Castle nut, cotter pin, right ///Thanks, Carl
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OK Its all coming together....I removed the blue seal from the back of the spindle and cleaned up all the excessive grease.

View attachment 434096

I then repacked the bearing and installed the blue seal which fit very tightly on to the back of the rotor, over/on top of the bearings. In retrospect I believe this seal is only 3000 miles old. The rotor now goes back onto the spindle. I am assuming there are no other parts involved - I will also fill that depresson in the blue seal/bearing with a little more grease. Now that I have gone through that exercise I recall mounting that seal on the back of the rotor 20 some years ago however I have taken the rotor off multiple time over the past couple of years and the seal was always disloged and I just assumed that was the way it was supposed to be. Both the front and rear bearings are 3000 miles old. Considering the way this all fits together I am at a loss to understand how it can come off of the rotor, considering the tight fit and stick to the back of the spindle housing as shown in an earlier picture. Bob did say they can pop off and well that appears to be the case. Thanks for solving my mystery everyone. Carl
Cub, can you further clarify the following sentence, "The outer seals/caps are the ones I always have a hard time with, air pockets always build up underneath it and sometimes I even have to use an adhesive on them because one of them keeps popping off." ???? Above we were talking about the inner seal, what are the outer seal/caps. Outer bearing, then large metal washer that fits one way, Castle nut, cotter pin, right ///Thanks, Carl
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Glad you got things figured out. The seals pop off in my experience due to too much grease being stuffed in between the bearings etc. I leave a little cavity of air around the spindle, not much of one but a little bit. If you pack it in so tight with grease it finds a way out especially once things warm up get moving & expand. Part #3071 Would be the outer grease/ bearing seal I was referring to. HTH

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I think some of the seals just don't have good manufacturing. The ones like Carl has, with the outer edge being a larger diameter than the main body of the seal, are the worst. They seemed to be shaped so as to try to work themselves out. I have not ever used adhesive but just use a sharp punch to put some dimples into the inside edge of the step in the hub where the seal inserts. That raises some metal around the punch marks to grab the seal and hold it in.
 

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I think some of the seals just don't have good manufacturing. The ones like Carl has, with the outer edge being a larger diameter than the main body of the seal, are the worst. They seemed to be shaped so as to try to work themselves out. I have not ever used adhesive but just use a sharp punch to put some dimples into the inside edge of the step in the hub where the seal inserts. That raises some metal around the punch marks to grab the seal and hold it in.
I rarely have problems with the inner seal, I was thinking that a new seal might be in order as well. Replacing it along with a little less grease & you should be good to go 😊
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You Know that seal actually fit seemingly very tight when I reinstalled it today. Used a rubber mallet to make sure it was on all the way. That seal also has a spring ring on the inside - wonder if that is actually contributing to it popping off. But you know its not the end of the world. I don't plan to put that many miles on the car and I was not loosing that much grease. However glad to had gone through this exercise, always good to learn and new things continue to pop up that I had no idea about, some of them embarrassing but again I contine to learn.
 
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