Opel GT Forum banner
1 - 20 of 68 Posts

·
Opel Junkie
Joined
·
113 Posts
i run 100 low lead aviation fuel in mine, and it loves it. you can find it at an airport. try to find a place that has self serve fueling, and get to know the people that run the fbo. i am a partner in an fbo at new century, kansas, and we have guys that will come in on fridays to get gas for their hot rods. we chat with them, show them our cars, etc. they get good gas (100+ octane) for a lot less than the track sells it for, and we get to talk cars on friday afternoons!!

ps any of you kansas city area opelers feel free to come out for the good gas!!

mike
 

·
4ZUA787
Joined
·
665 Posts
about avaition fuel i have access to my local torrance municiapl airport, i have been thinking of filling up one day with a full tank of 100 octane, it cant hurt to try it, it hasnt killed an opel yet, he he he.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,065 Posts
Run the lowest octane you can without detonation. Higher octane will do nothing but empty your wallet. You will also make more hp with the lowest (safe) octane. Dyno proven....
 

·
Old Opeler
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
Regular vs Premium

A little realised fact is that lower octane gas actually has more energy per pound than high octane gas. Plus the lower octane gas burns quicker and so needs less ignition advance.
The higher octane fuels reduce the tendency to detonate by being made to burn slower.

In consequence lower octane gas gives more power and better gas milage - as long as detonation does not occur. Just as Rally Bob says.
 

·
Opel Junkie
Joined
·
113 Posts
aviation fuel

my point with using aviation fuel is this:

burning unleaded fuel in an engine designed to use leaded fuel will cause the exhaust valves to eventually burn up. the valve seats in these engines are not hardened, causing them to heat up and erode faster.

aviation fuel contains lead, which does raise the octane, but it also helps cool the exhaust valves & seats.

true, lower octane (unleaded) fuels are cheaper, but just try to find a leaded fuel anywhere. the only place you can still get it is at a ractrack, and it's about $4.50/gallon. aviation fuel is around $2.50/gallon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,344 Posts
Here's another thing to consider about using AVGAS. It is formulated to be used in aircraft engines that do not turn above 3750 RPM. They figure out the burn rate at the refinery. I found this out in A & P school. Had a friend way back when I was racing bikes, filled his tank with 110-145 octane, he ran like a bandit for about 3-4 laps, then his engine siezed up. He was jetted for the gas, but it didn't help. And he was running above 10,000 RPM.

Ron
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,065 Posts
Re: aviation fuel

mjewell said:
but just try to find a leaded fuel anywhere. the only place you can still get it is at a ractrack,
True...but the reason is it's illegal to operate a motor vehicle on leaded fuel on US highways these days, courtesy of the EPA.
Aviation fuel has an added benefit too, it runs very cool EGT's. A friend of mine used to run it in his Opel racecar, mostly because of the cost. But we found the car ran about 10 degrees cooler water temps and about 200 degree cooler EGT's than with 'real' racing fuel.

Another problem in some states is that AV gas can't be sold to non-pilots (that is, to car guys). Here in Connecticut we have our own Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) which is tougher than the EPA. They have made if very difficult to circumvent a lot of these loopholes. Of course, I can drive 1/2 hour north to Massachusetts and they'll not only sell me AV gas, they'll pump it into my gas tank!
 

·
Member
Joined
·
199 Posts
The REAL reason it is illegal to use aviation fuel in a motor vehicle is not the lead/EPA issue but the federal and state highway taxes we pay on the fuel we buy at the pumps. You can get "Farm Only" fuel which depending on locality can be 60 cents a gallon cheaper then the same grade/type highway fuel. The only difference is the tax issue and the dye used to distinguish the two.

Brian
 

·
Old Opeler
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
bosco said:
would 87 octane run cleaner than 91 octane......in an emissions test environment?
Not if the slightest amount of detonation begins to occur - and retarding the spark to prevent that will push the emissions up through the roof!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,733 Posts
As far as the Opels are concerned, we have to keep in mind the "high" compression ones and the "low" compression ones, let's not get anyone confused and cause a mistake (holes in pistons, etc.).
Compression ratio, ignition timing, octane rating. Three factors to fully understand before playing with gas and timing...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,020 Posts
GTJIM said:
Not if the slightest amount of detonation begins to occur - and retarding the spark to prevent that will push the emissions up through the roof!
Emissions testing generally measures three things; Nitrides of Oxygen (NOX), Unburned hydrocarbons (HC's) and Carbon Monoxide (CO). All other things equal (in the absence of detonation, more about that in a moment), NOX goes UP with more advanced ignition, due to higher combustion temperatures, if I recall the basic engine theory that they tried to jam into my head in "Internal Combustion Engines: Theory and Practise" during a very hectic third year of Engineering. Unburned HC's go the other way, while CO has more to due with mixture. The curves relating to HC/NOS and CO are all a bit contrary to each other wrt to mixture, which is why three way catalysts and lambda-sonde O2 sensors with highly accurate fuel mixture feedback control is the norm is modern fuel systems. Well, they ALL are more affected by mixture, but let's stick with the issue of octane and ignition advance.

Octane is a measurement of the TEMPERATURE that gasoline will spontaneously (prematurely) combust. What goes along with that is also the HEAT of combustion, and the SPEED of the flame propagation. Higher octane fuel generally has a higher heat of combustion (more long chain HC molecules which have a greater specific heat when burned) but I believe that the flame speed is actually LOWER at higher octanes. Heady stuff! But in simple terms, if you aren't pinging (detonating) on regular gas, and your ignition is sufficiently advanced to get optimal thermal conversion (35 degrees at maximum advance), then higher (or lower) octane fuel will provide little significant benefit, regarding either power or emissions. Actually, clean crankcase oil has more benefit. Less off-gassing due to accumulated unburned HC's.

HTH
 
1 - 20 of 68 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top