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Ok, I just got my tank cleaned and am now ready to redo my fuel line. From the forums I have gathered that I should use 5/16" line, I think. Should I go with a plastic line or metal? If metal, steel? copper? whats the best way to bend it.
I don't think the line that is run now (metal, plastic, and rubber) is stock, and i'm not sure if it has been ran where it is supposed to be. Is there anything I am forgetting about? So any information will be greatly appreciated by my GT and I.
Thanks
Steven
 

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Stephen,

you can get a whole roll of aluminum fuel line from Summit or Jegs for $20. Easy to bend and work with.

My 2c's
Jc
 

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Fuel Line Material

I was just at the GoodGuys car show and picked up aluminum fuel line from a vendor. They had stainless steel, aluminum, and plastic. That hard plastic original line on the Opel was disintigrating. Personally, I shy away from rubber and plastic fuel line because they are somewhat exposed under the car to road hazards. And of course there's the cool scenes in PayBack & The Saint where the fuel lines are cut and the gas is ignited. Whoa - doesn't get better than that.

I asked the vendor about aluminum line. I was concerned about di-electric charge from the pump, fittings, clamps, etc. And about fuel contamination from the metal. Vendor says Not To Worry.

For whatever it's worth.........

Plus, it's real easy to work with. Vendor says only use stainless steel in the engine compartment where it shows.
 

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4ZUA787
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i jus used copper all the way up to the engine compartment by the timing cover then went to a rubber fuel line then to a clear glass filter then to the carb. soft copper tubing is very easy to bend also.
 

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TB_6230 said:
From the forums I have gathered that I should use 5/16" line, I think.
Using 3/8" line will prevent the common fuel starvation issue that occurs when upgrading the motor. It likely won't cost you much more and may save you considerable effort in the future, if you ever plan for more power.

If you do decide to use metal line, be sure to keep it away from all things hot. This includes the motor itself.

-Travis
 

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Folks, a little info on using metal fuel lines from my USAF days. You need to support the lines every 12-18 inches to help eliminate vibrations and metal fatigue. Think of taking a beer can and bending it back and forth numerous times, eventually it will crack and break into two pieces. The vibrations in a car will accelerate that movement a lot, so supporting the lines keeps the movement to a minimum. The stronger metal, the harder it is to break. Therefore stainless or plain steel is less susceptible to metal fatigue than copper or brass. Just my $.02.

Ron
 

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A JEGS representative, who also was former USAF, told me something very similar. He advised to use a short "flex" line (braided or rubber/comp) when going from the tank to a rigid line (fastened to the body) and another short flex line when going from a rigid line to the carb. In addition, flex lines should be used at each end of or an electric fuel pump that's mounted to the body -- for the same reasons that Ron gave -- to absorb vibrations and prevent metal fatigue. You AF guys know your stuff about hoses, pipes, fittings, etc. (He also gave me a quick lesson on "AN" fittings).

I'm upgrading to 3/8 inch line on my GT. Installation is not complete yet, but I have a plan and the pieces and parts. I replaced the original 5/16 inch bung in the tank with 3/8 inch pickup. I plan to connect to the bung with a 90deg AN 6 fitting, braided hose to the electric fuel pump, braided line from the outlet to a steel line, and braided hose from the steel line to the carb.

Ken
 

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Ken, you may want to check out "Earls Performance Parts" for the AN fittings. Somewhere in the National Stock Lists there is an AN to a hose fitting, and some of those are 90 degrees. I have an outlet here inSANe DIEGO, they have already helped in converting the metric to AN and back to metric for the oil pressure transmitter on the V-6 swap. That was the only way I could go to 90 degrees off the oil filter housing on the engine. Now for those who want to go to AN fittings and make up your own lines, you CANNOT use an automotive flaring tool on the lines. The auto flaring tool is 45 degrees and the AN fittings are 37 degrees. I checked the price on an AN flaring tool and it's about $100, so I'll have to go to the local airport for the lines to be made up on my FI system. I've already checked the 70 psi fuel pump and 100 psi filter can with the engine running on the stand and the 5/16" fuel delivery system works just great through the whole RPM range. Even with the pump bypassing fuel to keep it cool when there is no demand on the system. One thing on the steel braided hoses, all of them are thin teflon tubes wrapped with the steel braid. You do not want to put such a severe bend in them that they get crimped. If you crimp the braided line, trash it, a leak will develop under pressure after time. Been there, done that.

Ron
 

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whoever put my after market electric fuel pump in put it in right next too my distributor so it can plug right into the ground... then it sends a rubber line over my valve cover and too the carb.... I think it looks like a slop job and I was wondering where you guys put your after market electric pump and where I should put mine so its hidden or normal.

thanks,
RMO
 

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RMO, the preferred location of all electric fuel pumps is as close to the fuel source as possible, read that to mean fuel tank. They are most efficient as pusher pumps than puller pumps. I've seen them mounted on the floor pan, driver's side just forward of the differential. On my GT with the 3.4 sequential fuel injected engine, I plan to mount it next to the fuel line coming down and out of the rear of the car, behind the rear tire. I also plan to build a removable sheetmetal box to cover the fuel pump and filter and protect it and the connections, fuel and electric, from road debris. All flexible lines will be covered under the box with stainless lines going to the engine compartment, with flex lines going to the engine fuel lines on the fuel rail. HTH.

Ron
 
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