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That comes out to $5.60 a gallon. Not surprising though, considering this is in San Diego. I don't know how regular people survive in Cali anymore, it's too dang expensive there. Roughly 160,000 people are homeless in Cali. That is mind boggling. Cali does have a population of roughly 39.5 million people, so that is a small percentage of the total but that is still a lot of people. That is like filling up the SoFi Stadium in Cali (where the Super Bowl was held) a little more than twice, of just homeless people. If every homeless person in Cali was to riot, that riot would be larger in size than the entire military of Canada.
I did this project for school where we had to buy a $200,000 house in indiana and California. The house in indiana was pretty nice that I found and it had a barn. In California the houses we very crappy for the same price and the “barns“ we just a bunch of random pieces of wood and scrap put together. I don’t know why people would want to live there I guess it might be cool but still the prices are crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #122 · (Edited)
I did this project for school where we had to buy a $200,000 house in indiana and California. The house in indiana was pretty nice that I found and it had a barn. In California the houses we very crappy for the same price and the “barns“ we just a bunch of random pieces of wood and scrap put together. I don’t know why people would want to live there I guess it might be cool but still the prices are crazy.
It must be the California girls. Lets take a trip with Snoop Dog and Katy Perry Lol. It's the water. Lol. This video was not what I was expecting. I was aiming for the Beach Boys, or at the least David Lee Roth, he had some girls.;) Lol


3.99 87 octane. 4.69 premium, here in Central Carolina
 

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I did this project for school where we had to buy a $200,000 house in Indiana and California. The house in Indiana was pretty nice that I found and it had a barn. In California the houses we very crappy for the same price and the “barns“ we just a bunch of random pieces of wood and scrap put together. I don’t know why people would want to live there I guess it might be cool but still the prices are crazy.
The price of a house in CA varies a lot depending on where you live - for example you cannot find a house in Los Angles, CA for 200,000 and if you did you would not want to live there. There are parts of California that are nice but around the large cities, in MHO, would not consider living there and I have a daughter in the LA area. She rents and it is very expensive. The traffic is horrific....I traveled there, on business, starting int the mid 80's, before my daughter was born and I knew then it was not somewhere I would want to live. No offense intended to those that live there, but bottom line there are just so many other places that are just easier to live. The average price of a house in LA is currently over 650,000 and most likely that would be a very small house or condo - I mean really small.....
 

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I did this project for school where we had to buy a $200,000 house in indiana and California. The house in indiana was pretty nice that I found and it had a barn. In California the houses we very crappy for the same price and the “barns“ we just a bunch of random pieces of wood and scrap put together. I don’t know why people would want to live there I guess it might be cool but still the prices are crazy.
Sounds like your teacher is giving you an introduction to economics. There are many reasons for the wide differences in home prices, but it all starts with supply versus demand. Some factors that contribute are population density and the general economic conditions. For instance, "Silicone Valley" has produced an abundance of people that range from modestly wealthy to filthy rich, and they are all eager to do the reverse commute -- live in San Francisco and commute to the Valley. This demand, fueled by lots and lots of dollars, is driving the price of homes significantly higher. Contrast that with downtown Detroit (not to pick on Detroit). Detroit was once a booming city driven by the automobile industry that has since shrunk. A popular TV "reality" show from a few years ago, Rehab Addict, featured a woman that bought old homes for cheap and renovated them.

Conditions change over time. States with fundamentally more punitive tax structures such as New York, California, New Jersey and Illinois have, for years, seen a net exodus of residents (more people leaving than coming in), according to an annual survey taken by one of the national moving firms. Some of this exodus is by individuals seeking to keep more of their own money, and some of it is resulting from jobs leaving the states as employers seek to do the same thing. This can only put downward pressure, over time, on housing costs in those states. Conversely, a state such as Texas, specifically the Austin area, is seeing an influx of jobs, and people, from California, helping to elevate prices in that area.

I am an example of that movement. A few years following my retirement, I tired of the fact that I lived in the most heavily taxed state in the nation (New Jersey) and moved to Maine. New Jersey is and has been the headquarters location for a number of high-valued industries, especially pharmaceuticals, providing the employment that provides the dollars that have driven prices higher. Maine, on the other hand, does not have such a robust economy, and as a result, housing is generally far cheaper. I moved from a three-bedroom, two bath house, with a large garage and on two acres, to a similar situation in Maine where I paid 50% of the price that I sold my NJ home for, pocketing the difference, and, as an added benefit, my property taxes fell by 80%.

I suspect Rally Bob may have had similar reasons for shifting from CT to NH.
 

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I suspect Rally Bob may have had similar reasons for shifting from CT to NH.
You know it!

There were multiple reasons really. My money in NH gets me far, far more. My NH home would be $800k to $1 million in CT.

CT is also very highly taxed. Taxes upon taxes. The ‘insurance capitol of the world’, therefore high insurance rates.

I got 10.32 acres and a 4000 sq ft (8 year old) house for about 1/3rd the cost of a similar home in CT.

But I also like the more unplugged lifestyle. Everyone is more relaxed. People wave and say hi to total strangers. Road rage is barely a thing. Nature is everywhere. Zero state sales tax. Zero state income tax.
 

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You know it!

There were multiple reasons really. My money in NH gets me far, far more. My NH home would be $800k to $1 million in CT.

CT is also very highly taxed. Taxes upon taxes. The ‘insurance capitol of the world’, therefore high insurance rates.

I got 10.32 acres and a 4000 sq ft (8 year old) house for about 1/3rd the cost of a similar home in CT.

But I also like the more unplugged lifestyle. Everyone is more relaxed. People wave and say hi to total strangers. Road rage is barely a thing. Nature is everywhere. Zero state sales tax. Zero state income tax.
I also looked in NH when I was looking to move to Maine. While there is no income tax in New Hampshire, the state makes up for it with a property tax figure that approaches that of NJ. Retired, I live off my own savings plus a small income that does not generate a lot of income tax, so New Hampshire's absence of income tax meant nothing to me in my decision. That absence of income tax is not fully offset by the relatively high property taxes, so it benefits someone to live and work in southern NH, compared to neighboring Mass., the result being that houses in NH are more expensive than in Maine. For retirees such as myself, it works the other way -- we also pay little in the way of income taxes and our property taxes are much lower than in our neighboring state. Little wonder that Maine has the second-largest retiree population, both in aggregate as well as percentage, behind Florida.

In fairness, I should also disclose that my property tax situation is somewhat special, in that the town where I live really puts the screws to a warehouse complex (that it laughingly refers to as "the industrial center"), which has the effect of lowering its residents' property tax rate. My mil-rate is about half that of neighbors literally up the street from me in the next town over, but even so, had I moved there rather than to my current home, my property taxes would still be far lower than they were in NJ. But, I'll add, because my property taxes are so much lower than the neighbors that are less than a mile from my house, the home values in my neighborhood tend to be higher.

To paraphrase Bill Clinton's statement during his 1992 campaign, It's all about the economy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #132 ·
Actually ours are going down. I saw 3.89 at 4 stations today. Coming back from V.I.R., I topped off my tank on the Jeep at 3.91 in a very small town with only 2 gas stations. Maybe it's the distance from the terminal where they load the tankers that determines the price?
 

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Price of oil has come down about $23 per barrel from its peak, although it is still about 34% above last year's price (this per today's Wall Street Journal).

Decades ago I worked for Texaco, and yes, the distance from the tank farm can influence the price at the pump, at the margin. After all, the oil company is paying the driver to deliver it; the truck itself requires fuel to get the load to its destination; and there is a direct relation between miles driven and the depreciation charge the company takes against its trucks.
 

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Andy Kessler writes a weekly column in the Wall Street Journal and today's piece takes after the Newsome Administration and its handling of the gasoline situation. He is also critical of the Administration's handling of California's water shortage, but that is irrelevant to this thread. But Kessler quotes the Western States Petroleum Association statement that in California, the price of a gallon of gas includes $1.27 for taxes and regulatory programs. That is the start. California sits on the fifth-largest oil reserve among the fifty states, so we would expect it to have relatively cheaper gasoline. But instead it ranks as the most expensive. The governor has proposed his solution that apparently will be voted on in the legislature this week -- he wants to mail every driver a $400 "gas tax rebate" debit card. Owners of electric vehicles will also get a $400 card, even though they do not pay gasoline taxes because....well, you know why. Adding to the absurdity, electric vehicle owners in California already get a one-third reduction in their electric bills from the California Home Charging EV2-A electricity rate.
 
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