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I found this pic today, it’s from Parget GmbH from the 1980’s. The prototype Mirage body kit during the development phase.

I though it was relevant since Gordon’s GT probably has the last known new Mirage kit in existence.

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The Young One
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I found this pic today, it’s from Parget GmbH from the 1980’s. The prototype Mirage body kit during the development phase.

I though it was relevant since Gordon’s GT probably has the last known new Mirage kit in existence.

View attachment 440984
It looks like you could actually put gas in this car with that wing design. Kind of a weird design though.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #143 ·
I found this pic today, it’s from Parget GmbH from the 1980’s. The prototype Mirage body kit during the development phase.

I though it was relevant since Gordon’s GT probably has the last known new Mirage kit in existence.

View attachment 440984

WOW! Awesome find there Bob! It's interesting to see that bit of design and development.
 

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But you gain 10 extra Hp with the ricer wing. Lol
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #148 ·
And how is Velcro better?
The difference is that my wing isn't held on entirely by velcro, magnets, suction cups, etc. A massive clunky pair of hinges hold it on. The removable attachment method just keeps it from bouncing around. Mine won't ever fall off and kill someone on the highway.

Hey, maybe the suction cups WILL create an unbreakable bond to the car that will never fail. 🙄
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #149 ·
Measurements for mounting Solstice side mirrors on an Opel GT.

Someone asked me for any advice I could give for doing my 3-bolt Pontiac Solstice side view mirrors mod. I will be doing this mod again on the doors of my new "Banana" car, in my basement and not on the car, so this request was a good thing because I needed to take measurements of where I put them on my GTX car. Basically, the most forward edge of the foot of the mirrors is 3" horizontally from the door/body gap. The top of the foot is 1/2" below the windowsill and the opening for the mirror is perpendicular to the ground. There is room for error and you don't have to be super exact, 1/4"-1/2" of variance up/down or front/rear is okay. You'll notice in the pics that the top of the foot on my driver's side one is right up against the windowsill, whereas the passenger side is 1/2" lower. I probably did the driver's side first and realized that being right at the window sill made it really hard to tighten the bolts because of a flap of metal inside the door. So, I must have lowered the passenger side one by 1/2". Do not try to make the angle of the mirror match the A-pillar angle, this will angle the opening for the mirror too far down and may make viewing difficult. Make the opening in the mirror housing perpendicular to the ground. The top of the mirror housing should end up relatively parallel to the ground. You will need to grind or sand off a bit of the bottom edge of the foot to try to get it's outwards curve to conform better to the inwards curve of the door. You will not be able to grind enough off to make them match, so you will have to use some sort of foamy, rubbery, stuff to make a gasket to fill the gap.

When you are done you will have mirrors that match the styling of the car and don't vibrate like the 2-bolt mirrors that everyone uses. And crazed screaming little kids can yank and pull and hang from the mirrors and not tear them off. Ask me how I know. You can also bump into them in your garage and not break them off or change their adjustment, as often happens with the oem make-up mirrors.


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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #150 ·
Various projects happening at the same time.

I've run across the problem of having to deal with multiple install and modification projects happening at the same time. Whole bunches of things can't be done until other things are done and those things have to wait until this, that, and other things are done. Can't put the F+R windows in until the headliner and "some" of the upholstery is in. Can't finish the pop out windows until all the upholstery and headliner around them is done. Can't do some of the upholstery until "some" of the carpet is installed. Can't finish the carpet until I make a center console. Etc., etc..

Aaarrgghh! The deluxe carpet set is a PIA to install and adapt to my mods. It's really rigid and won't stay bent going around curves. You have to glue or screw various parts before you can move onto other parts. The spray glue that came with it and some upholstery items is not very effective. 3M Super 77 is a much better product to use. I'll be using Goop to glue upholstery around window and door flanges. I never used precut carpet before, I've used much more pliable rolls of generic, cheap, auto store or JCWhitney auto carpet or household carpet and padding in the past. I also do most of my own upholstery and panels myself. This time around I thought I would save myself some time buying pre-made stuff. It ain't saving me any time. I used to be able to rip all the carpet and upholstery out of a GT and redo the carpet in a weekend. Upholstery I can do in a week. It's going to take me a month or two using the pre-made stuff. Ice cold weather in a tiny garage that I can only afford to heat while I'm in it makes the proper curing of glues and paints a chore.

Other side projects include having to use a drill and a 1/16" bit to try to get the body putty slop out of the screens at the front of my Lenk hood. The body shop did an absolutely marvelous job smoothing out the bottom of my hood, but they didn't mask the screens before doing so and they painted the hood with all the slop on the screens. Picking and poking wouldn't get the stuff off, so I have to drill and ream each little square as best I can. I'll be painting the screens black. About 10 years ago someone was selling NOS aluminum with white trim rear view mirrors on Ebay. I had the one in the pics in my white interior Red Baron car, so it is the obvious choice for this car. I have no idea what Opel it was originally made for. It bolts on a little differently and sits a little higher than I would like, if I recall correctly. I have to work on that. And yesterday I started work on the center console. The auto gear selector is normally bolted to the car, with the center console stuff laid on top of it. In the pics I have it just sitting on top of the wood so that I could take pics. My dashes extrude outwards in the center, which deletes the headlight flip lever and the oem ash tray location. Auto tranny dudes don't need a parking brake, so I delete those, which enables me to put a universal arm rest center console storage box there and relocate the ash tray, now used for spare change and other junk, there.
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I'm debating/experimenting with the center console color scheme. The obvious way to go would be to do it like I did my GTX car and have it flow and match with the center part of the dash. That would mean putting red oak veneer on the flat top surface with beige upholstery down the sides. But I had a bunch of red oak strips of wood left over from a park bench I made and eventually took apart. They have nice router-rounded edges and they're red oak like the dash, so a natural choice for the sides of the center console. But that would change the color scheme and I would have to put beige vinyl on the flat surface. This would reverse the color scheme. I COULD red oak veneer the flat surface AND have the red oak on the sides. I'm undecided and will have to do a mock up to see if I like the look. Or I could stay with the original plan and put the beige vinyl over the red oak strips and red oak veneer on the flat, but that would sort of defeat the whole purpose of using the red oak strips. Decisions, decisions,.........
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #152 ·
Cuttin', Screwin', and Gluin'.

Today I trimmed and glued some more carpet in the back of the car and cut a passageway through the metal support for the luggage shelf. I'll be putting my fuse box under the luggage shelf and the passageway is so that I can run wires forward from the box and under the carpet along the tunnel. Yeah, I could have gotten totally anal and taken a hole saw and drilled a cool round hole through the support for the wires. I decided to just slice a passageway with my angle grinder and put some door edge molding over the cut edges.

With the carpet and channel cut, it was now time to make a new and improved luggage shelf out of stiff, thicker, better quality wood and cut it along it's length for a piano hinge, so that I can access my fusebox. I used a nice piece of red oak for the "hatch" and a scrap piece of mahogany plywood I had kicking around for decades. It had been glued to another piece of wood with Liquid Nails and was kind of useless for any other kind of nice project. I whipped out my router and table that I haven't used in 15 years to round off the edges of the wood. The plywood gets screwed to the car. Interesting thing I noticed: The luggage shelf's metal support structure is strongly angled towards the rear of the car. Who knows why? To keep loose eggs or beer bottles from rolling forward when you hit the brakes? Apparently they didn't like this and the luggage shelf wood has curved wedges underneath to make the shelf more or less parallel to the ground. I needed to swap these over or fasten them to the car. I chose to swap them over to my new wood. I had to cut a 1" piece off of each of them to fasten to the plywood part to support it and then I glued the remaining parts to the red oak hatch/door. Tomorrow, when it's all dry, I'll have to adapt and glue on the luggage shelf carpet and trim. This will leave the underside of the hatch looking ugly with strips of the trim glued to it. On my other car, with black carpet, I just glued black carpet to the bottom of the hatch. It's really dark back there as a result, so with this car I might glue some beige vinyl upholstery to the underside of the hatch.


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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Wow Gordon - you are really making amazing progress and its just great to see the changes happening as if by magic over night, but we know its not magic and that its taking time to make those things happen. We also know you are loving every minute including the problems that you have to solve on a daily basis. Keep up the good work and of course keep us posted. Its going to be a super good looking GT. Can't wait.....
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #158 ·
Oooops! I made this post late yesterday evening and forgot to post it:

<<< The glued on wedges had set good enough for me to put the carpet on before bedtime and cure overnight for install tomorrow. I cut the wood about 1/2" bigger all the way around to fill gaps better, so that has made the tan trim around the edges a little too tight. That's okay, it'll work out just fine. >>>

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Did you put 1/4" carpet padding under that?
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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Discussion Starter · #160 ·
Nope, that would have made the tan edging even harder to stretch over the edges. I DID put 1/4" firewall insulator/sound deadener on the bottom side to dress it up some.

Luggage shelf installed:

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Fixing up an early GT ashtray.
I bought this early style pop up ashtray right out of a guy's car at Carlisle 2 years ago. He had to drive home ashtray-less, but with a fatter wallet. It has an actual working spring and latch! Astounding! But it had a sheen of rust all over it everywhere and very little of the original black paint. I've had it soaking in a mad scientist mixture of white vinegar, Marine Clean, Metal Ready, and Purple Power for the past 2 days. I wasn't optimistic as to how it would turn out. I plucked it out of the punch today and Holy Cow it's shiny almost everywhere. No, I'm not going to motorize it, Charley. Gosh it looks good, but, no, I'm not going to send it out for chroming. For now, my plan is to slip some of the red oak veneer into the lid's window, maybe paint the lid's frame beige, and clear coat the bottom part. The frame of the lid looks sort of galvanized and not all that good. Chroming it would take forever, cost a bunch, it would flake off when reassembled, and the metal would become brittle. I'm going to try to get away with doing the minimum on this one. My other car has a chromed up one(last 2 pics). I extracted the black pad and "bump" that was installed underneath and scrubbed at some rust, then tossed it back in my witch's brew of solvents and rust dissolver. It needs to cook a bit more.......

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