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Cabling

Here's where I've relocated the battery to in a GT. It rests on welded bracket on the floorpan. Hold-down studs are welded in place, and the top hold-down bracket is aluminum (custom). Ground stud is a stainless bolt welded to the chassis. There is also an auxiliary fuse box under the rear "seat" panel for accessories. Both sides of the upper and lower seat panels are retained by spring-loaded clips, and are easy to access.

Bob
How did you route the positive cable: under the floor or through the interior (I've seen both styles in various internet posts); and where exactly (might save me some time in experimenting to find the easiest route)? Where did the cable go from the outside to the inside of the car? What gauge and type (battery or weld) of cable did you use (I'm leaning towards a 2 AWG weld cable)?

Thanks,
Mark
 

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I am thinking of moving the battery from the front of my 73 GT to the right rear corner using an Optima sealed battery. Has anyone done this? What are the risks involved?
Thanks, Rick
I moved the battery to the back passenger shelf where the tire was. My 16 inch tires won't fit in there anyway so don't have a spare tire . Used a Yellow optima on its side. No problems but be very sure to cover the terminals . I learned the hard way. I had red tops but had problems . Yellow is better.
 

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No-weld battery tray/hold-down

Following along the suggestions in this thread I've relocated my battery to the luggage area, passenger side; basically the same location that Rally Bob used in the Mar 2002 post. Since I don't have welding equipment my variation was to fabricate a sturdy tray & hold-down without welding. I'm attaching some pictures. The tray and the top are symmetrical. Both start with a 3/4" plywood rectangle, with flat stainless bar stock (1/4" thick by 3/4" wide or 1.25" wide for the edge near the battery top) screwed to the plywood along the edges to create a recess for the battery (M6 threads tapped in flat stock with M6 x 1.0 screws counter-sunk into the plywood). The battery was a Miata, and I grooved the top and bottom pieces to accept the little ridge the top of the battery creates. I bolted the bottom plate to the floor with some M8 bolts and large hardened washers, with different length bolts and spacers to accommodate the sloping floor; on the front outside corner I used a vibration isolator as a standoff since it gave me a bit more length and also some flexibility. You can see the bottom tray bolted to the floor in the first picture. I also threaded the side flat bars on the bottom in 5 places to accept an M10 bolt. The hold down is by way of 5, 150mm M10 bolts run through the top plate, and threaded into the flat bars along the sides of the bottom tray. I used 12' of 2 gauge weld cable routed along the driver-side outside, paralleling a big grey cable that already ran that route. The cable ran through the top outside of the driver side foot-well, through to the engine compartment in the flat area just forward of the windshield wiper base.
 

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has anyone used the capacitor pack instead of a battery? I have seen them on u tube and was wondering if it would be a good fit for a small space. I realize that it wouldn't be good if you wanted to listen to the radio for a long period ,say as your washing and waxing the car but for starting ....... just wondering
 

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Following along the suggestions in this thread I've relocated my battery to the luggage area, passenger side; basically the same location that Rally Bob used in the Mar 2002 post. Since I don't have welding equipment my variation was to fabricate a sturdy tray & hold-down without welding. I'm attaching some pictures. The tray and the top are symmetrical. Both start with a 3/4" plywood rectangle, with flat stainless bar stock (1/4" thick by 3/4" wide or 1.25" wide for the edge near the battery top) screwed to the plywood along the edges to create a recess for the battery (M6 threads tapped in flat stock with M6 x 1.0 screws counter-sunk into the plywood). The battery was a Miata, and I grooved the top and bottom pieces to accept the little ridge the top of the battery creates. I bolted the bottom plate to the floor with some M8 bolts and large hardened washers, with different length bolts and spacers to accommodate the sloping floor; on the front outside corner I used a vibration isolator as a standoff since it gave me a bit more length and also some flexibility. You can see the bottom tray bolted to the floor in the first picture. I also threaded the side flat bars on the bottom in 5 places to accept an M10 bolt. The hold down is by way of 5, 150mm M10 bolts run through the top plate, and threaded into the flat bars along the sides of the bottom tray. I used 12' of 2 gauge weld cable routed along the driver-side outside, paralleling a big grey cable that already ran that route. The cable ran through the top outside of the driver side foot-well, through to the engine compartment in the flat area just forward of the windshield wiper base.
It would be a good idea to put a thick coat of insulation, rubber, plastic strip, something on top of the stainless steel bar under the cable ends. A short there might send your car up in flames.
 

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That battery looks like it has water in it, if it is you can not mount it on it's side. and should not mount it in side the cabin as they vent fumes.
To mount on side it has to be a gel type.

Pat
 
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That battery looks like it has water in it, if it is you can not mount it on it's side. and should not mount it in side the cabin as they vent fumes.
To mount on side it has to be a gel type.

Pat
You're right in your later comment, I believe; it was designed for this type of application. From the manufacturer's website the description is:

SEALED VRLA, AGM, 12V 32AH, 320 CCA, NON-HAZARDOUS NON-SPILLABLE BATTERIES... Utilizing the very latest absorbed glass mat technology, this advanced battery has no free liquid electrolyte - unlike the current factory "flooded" battery.

And from the vendor (batteryplex) website's FAQ:

An AGM battery is a sealed, non-spillable maintenance free, valve regulated battery. An AGM battery utilizes a fine fiber glass material separator between the lead plates within the battery. The AGM design is also highly resistant to vibration deterioration. AGM batteries, are also called starved electrolyte they operate with no maintenance and can be installed in various ways (except upside down) without spill

Odd though, many sealed batteries are flat on top (e.g. the Optima red-top AGM) and don't have the protrusion that this battery does; this Westco does sort of look like a flooded cell, non-sealed battery with liquid electrolyte. I'm not sure why that is.
 

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It would be a good idea to put a thick coat of insulation, rubber, plastic strip, something on top of the stainless steel bar under the cable ends. A short there might send your car up in flames.
I think the angle makes the picture a bit deceiving. There's actually a pretty good gap between the stainless bar and the connectors on the terminal. Still that's something worth considering. Thanks.
 

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The cable ran through the top outside of the driver side foot-well, through to the engine compartment in the flat area just forward of the windshield wiper base.
My preference is for something a little safer. I don't remember what I used and will try to attach a picture at a later date. It also gave me a place to hook up jumper cables if they were needed.


Harold
 

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Personally, I wouldn't mount a standard AGM battery on it's side. Sometimes they swell while charging and can crack, leaking acid.
 

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Sealed Batteries Still Need Venting | boats.com Blog

Question: I just went for some really nice slim-line AGM batteries for my boat. They’re sealed so there is no gassing. Do I still need to provide some sort of ventilation for them? My mechanic says I do, but I’m not sure why. Is it to keep them cool? If they are sealed what’s the big deal?
Answer: This is a question that I get quite often. The short answer is, your mechanic is giving you the straight story and you do need to vent these batteries. Here’s why.
Even though your batteries are normally sealed, they actually do have a venting system integrated into the case top. In the event of an overcharge condition, it is possible for excess pressure to build up inside your battery. Your new batteries are equipped with check valves that are engineered to open at between 2-3 PSI depending upon the specific brand. What will be expelled is hydrogen gas, and you want to vent that as it is quite explosive.
The good news here is that hydrogen mixes with air very readily and so not too much ventilation is required. On an installation similar to yours I installed a small pre-made chromed louver, available at most chandleries, in the end of the settee. Just locate the louver as high on the side of the cabinet as you can reasonably get it. That will vent the compartment to the main cabin area, and from there it will get vented to the outside of the boat. Easy fix.

Do you really want a hydrogen leak inside the cabin?
 

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Not really but a sign in the car saying, "Please do not smoke, Hydrogen Gas present" works for me. :D

Harold
Rumor has it that methane is more worrisome in YOUR car.
 
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I have a pair of motorcycle AGMs which I am going to fit under the package tray behind my seats.

I am still waiting on the batteries, but after numerous 'depth' measurements, I have ~1/2" in height to construct a secure hold down for the batteries.

The plan is to run the batteries in parallel to each other, effectively doubling the capacity and cranking amps of a single battery. I'll run a single battery cable under the car next to the brake lines and on the opposite side of the frame rail as the fuel line, terminating at the starter. For the ground of the batteries, I am going to weld a stainless bolt to use as a ground stud in the floor of the package tray.

I would also like to see if I can incorporate a battery cut-off switch into the circuit so I can remove the battery connection to the car when I have to leave the car sitting for a while. Who needs their radio to save presets or show the right time? That's what cell phones are for now. And my EFI system will have a GPS plus a RTC unit, so it should be fine sorting out what time of day it is in the log files.

I'll post photos when I get some parts in and make some progress.
 

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... I am going to weld a stainless bolt to use as a ground stud in the floor of the package tray.
Forgive my curiosity, but Why Stainless?

Welding dissimilar metals is tricky, as it requires close attention to the chemical composition of both pieces. if you use the wrong filler material, you'll end up with a mess (corrosion, bad conductivity, etc).

Even if you're a master welder, up to the task, i doubt there would be enough benefit in the stainless to justify the hassle.

a regular steel bolt will conduct just fine.
 

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Brak - You're right, I don't really need a stainless bolt and could go mild. I was thinking that I might like the enjoyment of super pretty welds you get with stainless (I was going to use a 304 bolt and 309 filler). But Since I am already going to be borrowing a welder, I probably will have to stick whatever I am able to stick in there.
 

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I don't see a big deal welding stainless to mild steel. I've done the same thing myself for almost 25 years on my battery grounds. Steel rusts easily, especially when exposed to battery acid. Stainless gives a better ground IMO, especially if corrosion occurs.

I do the same exact thing, 309 filler rod with a 304 stainless bolt.
 

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Crossing my fingers that there won't be any battery acid :nervous:

I am using completely sealed AGM batteries, so there shouldn't ever be a leak. Don't really know how I will solve a leaking acid issue...

The bolt isn't going to be under any real load, so as long as the electrical connectivity is fine I'll be happy with just about anything. Right now I simply have to use whatever welding supplies are available to me when I go and use the welder.
 
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