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I was driving around with the headlights on for a few minutes and suddenly the amp meter hit the full right position. Then after a while, the headlights dimmed a bit and long beams didn't work so I thought it would be best to turn them off. After that, there were some sparks coming out of the fuse box area so I decided to pull off.

Got towed back home and started to examine what's gone wrong. Found out that the red/white cables with the copper/brass block between them had melted through the fuse box. (Picture attached) Probably then swinging around and creating sparks. Amp meter wiring seems to be ok, couldn't find any obvious failure with the head lights wiring either

Could some corrosion in the fuse block contacts create that much resistance and heat? Or could some wire be in contact with car body and shorting? Why would amp meter go straight to the right?
 

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Opeler
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Check the headlight wiring again, particularly the high beam side. You also should look at the headlight relays too. Your problem is a short somewhere, a serious one.
 

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Opeler
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Your amp meter went to the right due to whatever wire was shorting out causing an excessive amp draw. More then likely it was a hot wire shorting to ground. Has your headlights been rewired? If not, that's probably where your problem lies.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Headlight wires are mostly original, though there are some signs of tampering, probably by previous owner.

Ok, probably it would be best to rewire the headlights, have to think something to fix the fuse block. Replacement blocks seem hard to come by or really expensive.
 

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Your problem is more than likely right behind the rotators where the wires pass through the body. This is where they can twist when the headlights are opened and closed. The original wires were very bad and rot and turn brittle when they get old. Then you can get a direct short to ground. You are lucky you did not burn the whole car up.
 

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Opeler
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Opel GT - Sicherungskasten für Kabelbaum etc. (NEU) | eBay
Opel GT - Sicherungskasten für Kabelbaum etc. (NEU)
Opel GT - fuse box for wiring harness etc. (new) $77.06

Kabelbaum mit Sicherungskasten nicht zerschnitten Opel GT 1900 | eBay
Kabelbaum mit Sicherungskasten nicht zerschnitten Opel GT 1900
Wiring harness with fuse box not cut Opel GT 1900 $111.56

http://www.splendid-parts.de/kaufhaus_2/themes/kategorie/index.php?kategorieid=60
Don’t know if Splendid Parts would have a used Opel GT fuse box terminal.
 

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.. Why would amp meter go straight to the right?
Because it's only a shunt?
All current goes thru the amp-O-meter
'cept for the umetered flow
Does the high amperage starter cause the gauge to shift left or right when it's turned on?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the links Lindsay, already contacted the Ebay seller and asked some more info about condition of the fuse box. Haven't yet received an answer though.

wrench459
I don't remember Amp meter moving too much when starting. It was moving when using the signals. Haven't connected the battery after the meltdown

Actually the signal lights in the dash have also been acting up weirdly some time, sometimes both a lit same time, or they are flashing irregularly.
 

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No....its not a Buick....
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Sounds like you may have another problem other than the meltdown. There are threads here with the "double-flash" issue. Just do a search.
HTH.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Found the problem and GT is up and running again. The culprit was the broken voltage requlator which allowed maximum voltage out of altenator and melted fusebox. Both headlight bulbs were also broken, along with some other lamps. So this wasn't wiring problem after all.
 

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Original wires included a fusible link in the alternator output circuit, which should have popped before the terminal strip melted.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Perhaps there's no fusible link anymore, at least I didn't spot any. Need to think something to protect the circuitry. Wire colors look original though.
 

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Opeler
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Opel factory installed fusible link wire at starter solenoid (battery connection), 10 GA Red and
at alternator B+ connection, 10 GA Red terminal.

Fusible link wire should be 4-GA sizes smaller than the wire connected to.
10 GA wire would use a 14 GA fusible link wire.

There should be fusible link wire at voltage regulator, 12 GA Lt Blue/ White wire if the OEM style VR is used.
This would be 16 GA fusible link wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks. Would the 30A Maxi fuse also work instead of fusible link? Those would be easier to get. And yes I know they are not exactly the same thing.
 

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Opeler
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Über Genius
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Thanks. Would the 30A Maxi fuse also work instead of fusible link? Those would be easier to get. And yes I know they are not exactly the same thing.
I added a fuse instead of a fusible link. So far, so good.
 

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I added a fuse instead of a fusible link. So far, so good.
Advice from experience. Do NOT use a fuse rated near the max output that it may see. Years ago I installed a 35 amp inline fuse in my charging system. On at least two occasions my battery was low and the alternator charged at max output. The fuse did not blow but it did melt the solder that holds the thin strip of metal in the fuse. Same result and the solder got into the spring part of the inline fuse. I had to break the inline fuse the second time to get it apart. I changed to a 45 amp circuit breaker and never looked back.

Harold

P.S. I do realize you are talking about a blade type fuse and not a glass fuse like the one I used but I can foresee a similar outcome. :sigh:
 

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Advice from experience. Do NOT use a fuse rated near the max output that it may see. Years ago I installed a 35 amp inline fuse in my charging system. On at least two occasions my battery was low and the alternator charged at max output. The fuse did not blow but it did melt the solder that holds the thin strip of metal in the fuse. Same result and the solder got into the spring part of the inline fuse. I had to break the inline fuse the second time to get it apart. I changed to a 45 amp circuit breaker and never looked back.

Harold

P.S. I do realize you are talking about a blade type fuse and not a glass fuse like the one I used but I can foresee a similar outcome. :sigh:
In my case, I am pretty sure I'm using a 50 amp. I do know I'm using a blade fuse and there are no solder parts involved.
I abhor those inline fuses. It's too easy for them to have problems with the spring creating the connective force. In an engine compartment, that sees water, the connection will fail eventually.
 

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I abhor those inline fuses. It's too easy for them to have problems with the spring creating the connective force. In an engine compartment, that sees water, the connection will fail eventually.
Wikipedia said:
North-American built automobiles up to 1981 had electrical systems protected by cylindrical glass cartridge fuses....
I installed my inline glass fuse and holder probably in 1983. Not a lot of aftermarket inline blade fuse holders at the time. :sigh: Pre internet days and Auto Shack.

Harold
 
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