Opel GT Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Tazdbs 71 Opel GT
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is for those of us that have to replace the GT fuse box and want to save time. The shortcut is to cut a 1/2 inch slice out of the driver side of the replacement fuse box and then slide the 3 wiring harnesses into the rear slot in the back of the fuse box, slip the wires down to the fuse holder and relays, rivet the backing plate in and then connect everything very quickly. You may spend some time making the backing plate but it is a lot easier and faster than redoing the plugs and more wires.

You will need 7 rivets that are at least 1/8 inch diameter and long enough to go through the fuse box plastic, a backing washer and the metal plate; 7 backing washers, and a piece of metal 1/16 inch thick and 7 ¼ by 5 inches after cutting to final size.

There are 17 pictures that fully document this process and if you want them I can post them all later. I’ll post a few pictures of the process now.

Take pictures of the fuse box and wires from each side and below for reference. Label all unhooked / removed wires as needed. Read this first then proceed step by step.


1. Remove the old fuse box from the attaching points and let it hang free.

2. Remove the driver side kick panel and unhook the 3 wiring harnesses from their clips to give you more wire wiggle room.

3. Remove wires from relays, buzzer and fuse block (SEE NOTE). I taped them together per relay, buzzer, fuse section and wire nut to make them easier to reinstall.

4. Remove connector plugs, relays, and wires from the old box. You can cut or break the box as needed since it will be replaced.

5. On the replacement fuse box, make a metal backing plate the same size and shape as the drive side of the fuse box but without the little tab at the back. I used 1/16 inch thick aluminum metal for this which is good and strong and did not flex. Sand or file all edges smooth and round all corners.

6. Clamp the metal plate to the driver side of the box and drill 7 holes of 1/8 inch diameter for the rivets through the metal plate and the fuse box side. There needs to be two holes on the back area and 5 in the middle area. See picture # 7 for the best locations of the rivet holes.

7. Cut a ½ inch vertical strip of plastic out on the side of the fuse box for the wiring harnesses to slide through. Basically the vertical line runs up from each side of the back wire harness slot in the fuse box to the top of the box. Be very careful not to break the box. I used a scroll saw but any hand saw will do or a jig saw if you are very careful. File or sand the edges smooth. See pictures # 9 and 11.

8. Take the new fuse box and slide the wiring harness through the new slot and then into the back slot below the relay mounting bolts.

9. Rotate the fuse box so you have access to the side and install the backing plate with rivets. You must use rivets with backing plates if you put the rivets in from the front which is a whole lot easier. I did some from the inside and it’s a pain.

10. Push the fuse holder and wires down through their respective slots and connect them. Refer to your notes, pictures and info from OGTS if needed. Next install the plugs into the front and side of the fuse box.

11. Attach the fuse box to the car and slide the harnesses back into their clips. Double check your connections and put in the fuses. Install the kick panel.

This is the whole process and I hope it helps you as much as it did me.

NOTE: I do not know if you can pull the fuse block up through the slot in the fuse box and if so then you will only need to remove the wires on the relay side of the fuse block and move it through the lower front slot.

I am replacing my original GT fuse block with an ATC fuse block so that is why you see the long wires coming from my fuse box and I did not try pulling the original fuse block up through the fuse box.
 

Attachments

·
Just Some Dude in Jersey
Joined
·
15,866 Posts
Good ideas

Nice posting, Dick. As for myself, I just want to resupport my project car's cracked-at-the-mounting-screws fuse box. I like your idea of making individual plates that fit OVER the original plastic sides, leaving it mostly intact, and then riveting them in place.

What is this ATC fuse box mod? More pictures of that please.......
 

·
Opeler
Joined
·
3,151 Posts
USA Opel fuse box repair part

Nice posting, Dick. As for myself, I just want to re-support my project car's cracked-at-the-mounting-screws fuse box. I like your idea of making individual plates that fit OVER the original plastic sides, leaving it mostly intact, and then riveting them in place.

< snip >
Long time ago USA Opel sold a GT fuse box repair piece on eBay. Sheet metal repair piece fits over the (fuse box) plastic mounting flange that usually is cracked. Contact Opel Jim to find out if he still has any.

Link for the USA Opel fuse box repair piece:
http://www.opelgt.com/forums/general-discussions/19569-gt-fuse-box-easy-repair.html
 

·
Tazdbs 71 Opel GT
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fuse Block replacement

I purchased an ATC/ATO 12-way Heavy Duty, Side Terminal Fuse Block @ $16.95 from Arlington Products even though the GT uses 7 originally. All of the multiple wires that connect to each fuse I spliced together and merged into one for that fuse location. I am running jumpers for the fuse links for the 3 on the battery side also. The red and white alternator wire that came to the fuse block then back to the amp meter I shortened and connected to each other thus eliminating the connection. The red wire from the battery / fuse link was merged and a wire from there run to fuse 4, and also for my radio, rear defroster and fog lights. Fuse number 8 I am using to go into the gray green headlight wire from the switch and number 9 for the yellow white headlight wire so if they short out it blows the fuse instead of melting the wires. I am hoping later this week to be able to get back to working on the car and I'll get more pictures out.

Here's some more pictures of the replacement box and the front faceplate I made that wraps below the front of the box and is riveted in 3 places to keep it from comming off.

Dick
 

Attachments

·
Tazdbs 71 Opel GT
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ATC fuse Block and rewiring

I left the wires long when I rewired them so I could use the ATC fuse block as I WAS going to install it on the kick panel. I changed my mind after some test fits (nice place to kick it) and decided to put it where the original fuse block went, under the fuse box. So I had a lot of extra wire to shorten back up but it went well. I mounted the fuse block with a small bolt on the driver side and a zip tie for the center. I will make a metal bracket for the passenger side end when I get it installed back into the car body. I would have finished it tonight but it got too cold. If I decide to put the covers on, I'll remove the zip tie.

There are 12 circuits in this block and the original Opel GT has 7 in use. My 8th one is for the gray green headlight wire, 9 is for fog lights, 10 for the rear defroster, 11 for the radio and 12 is a spare but may be for a car alarm or big air horn! ha ha

Here are the pictures of the ATC fuse block with comparison shots of the Opel GT fuse block and the rewiring and painted fuse box. That's all there is unless there are any questions.

Dick
 

Attachments

·
Opel Key Master
Joined
·
5,348 Posts
Yes, your box has more fuse positions, but it lacks connections IMHO. The original fuse system was jumpered on the hot side in multiple locations, then a lot of things were tied into one circuit. Looks like you will have to splice several wires, or use the piggyback connectors
 

·
Senior Contributor
Joined
·
5,084 Posts
I think I would have tried to center the block and support it on brackets off the sides of the box. That way both ends of the new block would have been attached and your zip tie would not have been necessary. Another way to do it would have been to bolt up a flat piece of material to the box that is as long as the new fuse block and then attach the block to that rather than directly to the box.
 

·
Opeler
Joined
·
119 Posts
ATC fuse Block and rewiring

Thanks for posting this and I am wonering if anyone has used one from KWIK like the ones from KWIKwire.com.:banghead:
 

·
Tazdbs 71 Opel GT
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Additional info on wiring and securing fuse block

I jumpered the wires the same as the original wiring block and connected the multiple wires so there was just one connector per fuse. That work is hard to see in these pictures and part of the work is inside of the original fuse box. The end result is the current flows the same as the original design. That is why you will see different colored wires and larger diameter (for current) than the original Opel wires.

I tried the other ideas on the fuse block - centering and with a metal plate. Centering does not work as nothing matches up and the drivers side of the fuse box is in direct contact with the kick panel. This means there is no room to move the fuse block to the left side and this is why it is connected with the bolt at the driver side.

I didn't want to drill another hole in the bottom of the fuse box to weaken it and so the only way the metal plate works is to use the bolt hole on the driver side and to rivet it near the passenger end. Unless you use flush rivets then the rivet head will rub on the plastic fuse block on the underside. Over time the rivet could wear thru the case and that had me concerned so I opted for the zip tie which makes it sit flat and makes any changes easy and quick. With zip ties I can secure it at numerous places and still be able to access the fuses and keep the fuse block from moving. Right now it is very solid.

Thanks for the ideas and since I have 2 more GT's I may rewire, I need all the expertise and help I can get.
Dick
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top