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Clutch Adjustment and Tranny Leak

The 4 1/4 inch adjustment is the CABLE adjustment specification. Which is where you should start, unless you know the cable is correctly adjusted.

First, adjust the ball stud so that the end is 3/4 inch out of the bell housing. Don't tighten the lock nut quite yet.

Second, adjust the cable position (at the point where it exits the firewall under the hood) to get the 4 1/4 inch distance between the release lever and clutch housing face, with the return spring attached. Install the E-clip two grooves ahead of the washer on the rubber grommet.

Last, check that clutch pedal free travel is 3/4 to 1 1/4 inch. That's from the resting position to JUST where there is a bit of resistance, where the release bearing starts to contact the pressure plate fingers. Adjust the pedal free play by moving the ball stud in or out, to get the required pedal travel, and then tighten the locking nut.

As a good measure, add a second E-clip in front of the first, and then back THAT up with a 3/4 inch hose clamp around the slotted cable housing. Broken or displaced E-clips are the most common form of clutch problems in Opels.

HTH
 

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Driver
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks a lot Keith! My manual (Chiltons) only talks about adjusting the ball stud. That's it. It made no sense to me. I looked at the cable/firewall and it didn't look adjustable. But I understand now. Damn. I bet I didn't need to pull my trans at all!
I think the cable/firewall adj. has been my problem all along.
Oh well lessons learned. And a day spent working on the Opel is better than any day at work!
Now I just have to find the time to go refill the trans and do those adjustments. Maybe when the kid takes his first nap tomorrow.:D
Thanks again Keith.
 

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Another lesson learned, if you will allow me, is to start looking for a factory service manual. I have three aftermarket manuals (Drake, Autobooks and Chilton's Opel2) and I almost NEVER find information in those that isn't better described, illlustrated or explained in the Factory Service Manual. Although my Autobook and Chilton's manuals do actually describe the cable adjustment, neither properly describes the pivot bolt adjustment as the secondary adjustment.

In fact, I have become a bit of a manual junkie; I have a "working" 1972 Factory Manual that had seen better days, and so I punched all the pages with a three-hole punch and put it in a binder. Terrific for using in the garage, and I don't worry about getting it a bit greasy. And I have two more "good" factory manuals (one the green '71 manual, the other the orange '72 version) that I leave on my computer hutch, for looking up answers. I find that the '71 manual is more exact for my GT, which is a '71. But my two '72 manuals are better organized and illustrated, so I more typically use them for everday work.

I also bought a '75 Factory Manual Supplement for the fuel injection, related cooling system differences, and big brake information. And promptly "lent" it to Kat McCoy for her to use on her '75 Ascona Sportwagon. Because a manual is meant to be used, not stored as a collector's item. Although I still would like to get a copy of the "Glenn's" Tuneup and Repair Manual, since it seems like it has a few very good illustrations that even the factory manuals don't have.

My next pursuit is an early version of the Factory Manual, preferably a '69 or '70 Kadett/GT Service Manual, since the early cars had slightly different wiring and somewhat different differentials and transmissions.

As for what your original problem was, I wonder if is truly related to the tranny input shaft or friction disk splined hub being slightly rusty. I hope it turns out to be a simple cable adjustment, but if it "used" to work, an out-of-adjustment clutch seldom causes the dragging you describe. On the contrary, as the friction disk wears, the free play gets less, and the clutch will slip if the freeplay disappears completely.

I hoped you looked VERY carefully at the pilot bearing, and ensured that it was well cleaned and greased while you had the tranny out. And did you thoroughly inspect the friction disk. Sometimes one or more of the rivets can "pop" loose, causing it to drag even when the pressure plate is released. Did you happen to check it for "runout" (.016 " maximum at the outside edge)? If the disk gets warped, it will still grab even if the pressure plate is released.

Finally, any idea why the pan leaked? Usually you don't have to use sealant if the holes are un-dimpled and the surfaces are clean. Are you sure that the gasket between the tranny and the bellhousing didn't get displaced? Or that the front cup seal was seated properly in the bellhousing recess? Did you use sealant between the seal and the bellhousing? Sorry for pestering you, but I just spent the better part of a weekend rebuilding a tranny that probably died because the tranny leaked. And I myself had a catastrophic tranny failure (years ago) when I neglected to properly tighten the bolts that hold the tranny to the bellhousing. Same result.

Good luck, and tell us how you make out.
 

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Ditto

Last year I also began the "great Opel Manual Build-up" and I now have the factory manual for almost every year '54 to '79, as well as every aftermarket manual I could find. It really only took a lot of time and not a lot of money, but the investment is more than paid for in less wasted time and fustration.

Don't worry too much about the Glenn manual, as he is the auther of the Chilton's manual as well, so the share a lot of pictures and such.
 

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Driver
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Well an update on my longest project ever. (It is hard to work on a car with a 4-month old kid)
Good news-Pan doesn't leak any more. I guess I didn't get it completely flat, but gasket sealer fixed it.
Bad news-started it up and get a ugly tapping sound. Get's worse with the clutch in still audible with the clutch out.
Good news-The clutch is working good. Grabs good. Doesn't seem to have my original problem anymore!
Bad news- Tapping noise has to be fixed. Transmission must come back out. I really don't enjoy that.

What is the trick for getting it stabbed back in? That was really the hardest part for me. The bellhousing was hitting the tunnel and made lining it up very hard. Please don't say, "drop the engine and tranny as one" :(
I will try to get to it this weekend. Ho hum.
I need to get this project done. My list of to do's is getting longer.
replace/rebuild alternator, fix leaking left rear brake, make the side markers turn signals and driving lights in the turn signals...
It never ends...wait, that's why it's fun!!:D
 

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George;
The best way to pull/install JUST the trans in a GT is to separate the trans from the bell housing and install the same way.
Gene
 

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Driver
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
You know I thought about that. Is it easy enough to mate up the trans to bellhousing to avoid any leaks? It's definitely worth a try.
I'll have to pull the bellhousing anyway to look at my clutch and see what is making the noise. The ticking has that aluminum sound, almost like something is tapping the bellhousing.
Thanks,
George
 

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George,

The best way (short of dropping the entire engine/transmission, but you don't want to hear that!), is to install the bellhousing first. Make sure that the clutch disk is aligned perfectly before you tighten the pressure plate and install the bellhousing (with an alignment tool, available from OGTS for $4, or you can get commercial tools that fit). Make sure ALL of the bellhousing bolts (and support brackets) are properly tightened.

Then, make sure the front tranny cup seal (which sits in the bellhousing recess) is in good shape, and use sealer between it and the bell housing. Install a new gasket (with sealer) on the transmission, and let it dry. Also place a thin layer on the bellhousing surface just before you install the transmission.

Then, just slide the transmission in place, keeping it PERFECTLY level so you don't screw up the gasket or misalign the clutch disk. Ta da!

The hardest part of installing the transmission is to get the top bolts where it bolts to the bellhousing tight. I bought a cheap 15 mm box-end wrench, and cut it in half, since there isn't room for a socket, nor a full size wrench. MAKE SURE that these bolts are tight, since a good seal to the bellhousing depends on them. My first clutch job (twenty years ago) on my GT ended up with these bolts loosening up, dropping the tranny oil, and destroying the transmission. BAD THING!

HTH and good luck.
 

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I bought a transmission jack at Harbor Freight. Haven't used it yet so not sure it will really help on installing but it definetly will take the load off the arms.
 

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you guys are studs

I have routinely replaced the bolts with studs, or threaded bolts from the inside out rather. It takes the load off the arms and the seals, holds the gasket in place, and allows for easier-to-fit nuts instead of bolts. Might work for you too, but remember to locktite the bolts or studs in and trial fit them first to make sure there is room for the nut to fit.
 

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Driver
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Yeah I'm done with this project. Well I dropped the transmission again. And I must say I am getting pretty good at it. With about two feet of extensions and an elbow then socket I was able to hit the top two bolts with no problem.
Inspected everything and could not find where something looked wrong. I made sure I had the clutch disk right. (btw SACH's says "Getriebeseite" on it which means "Transmission side")
Then putting the pressure plate back on I realized that the first time I had accidentally grabbed one of the bolts that was used on the lower bell housing. The threads started too far up and it was not seating all the way before it ran out of threads. That's not good.
Put it all back together enough to start it and the noise was still there. I got down and was listening to it and pushed on the steel flywheel cover on the front fo the lower bellhousing, it changed. That was my noise! It has gotten cock-eyed and was rubbing the flywheel. Why pushing the clutch earlier made it worse I don't know. Unless that bolt was adding to the problem. I took the plate off and it was nice and quite. Hammered it straight and put it back in right, still nice and quit! Thank goodness that is done. As far as the original problem "hard time getting into first", that is fixed. I am guessing it was the slight rust and lack of 'thin' grease on the input shaft splines. Shifts nicely now. On to the alternator replacement.
Thanks to everyone who offered advise. My clutch was in major need of adjusting and Keith helped me get that right.
You guys rock!
 
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