Opel GT Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Code Goober
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw an info-mercial about this stuff alumaloy, it's basically a high temp solder. It's a zinc alloy that can supposedly bond to all kinds of metal, and be stronger than aluminum. I was wondering if anybody had ever tried it, or it's competitor alumiweld? It looked as if it would be perfect for using for porting an intake manifold. It has a melting point of 730 degrees F, and supposedly is non-reactive. Thoughts?
 

·
Code Goober
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's the stuff Hippie. The makeup of the stuff can be found on the web, if I recall correctly, it is like 75% Zinc. It is advertised as being stronger than aluminium (for drilling and tapping), bonds to almost anything (including pot metal), and bridges gaps. Like I said, it looked perfect for doing manifolds.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
my dad bought some at Carlisle. we tried using it yesterday on my neighbors alum. boat (propane didn't have enough heat to get the single area hot enough with out dispersing) the demonstration was impressive at Carlisle, the drunk guy would punch a hole the size of a dime in the bottom of a beer can then fill it in the first time around, he didn't have to go back to fill it in more then he hit it with the same punch in that spot 5 times and it crushed the can completely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I actually used it to plug up the holes left after porting my intake manifold... I finally got it to work but it took a little practice:
1) the parts have to be completely clean... no grease, paint, carbon, oxidation can be present. You have to use a STAINLESS Steel brush to clean the parts down to shiny aluminum.
2) Propane torch might work on a beer can but not on a manifold. The heat just sinks away too quickly. I used an acetylene torch with a neutral flame.

There's plenty of strength to patch holes in the intake manifold...but I was able to knock apart every butt joint that I practice "welded" on some aluminum bar stock. I've made several other "repairs" on non critical items with great success.
 

·
Non Civilian
Joined
·
2,100 Posts
I tried the stuff a few years back, with MAPP gas. It is crap. I would not trust the stuff to make an air tight seal. And could you imagine the damage it caused if it ever broke loose and got sucked into the engine?
 

·
Panel Beater
Joined
·
291 Posts
I used it in the past but more recently I have tested sodel 68 and sodel 480 which are similar competitive products. Other manufacturers would also sell comparable products. sodel 68 has a melting point of 735 F and is best welded with oxy- acetylene torches with a carburizing flame (excess acetylene 1700F flame). It has a tensile strength of 40,000 psi. Sodel 480 is flux core and 68 requires a flux. These products can work very well and require cleanliness as formentioned and good heat transfer to the part being welded for fusion.(therefore the carburizing flame). The weld is very strong but tends to get brittle next to the weld. The flux is corrosive and the weld can corrode quite rapidly and therefore should be cleaned with a brush and boiling water before any grinding mixes the flux back into the weld. Mig or tig aluminum welding are superior and can be tailored to the alloy being welded. The rods you mentioned have been supplied by various manufacturers with similar properties for years and were commonly used by body shops years ago before the mig and tig became popular and can produce good results especially on some pot metals.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top