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Code Goober
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a process similar to sand or media blasting, but using sodium bi-carbonate as the media. I was told that this process is gentle enough to do on a car without having to strip off the trim, and without damaging the glass. It was supposed to be strong enough to remove paint though. I was wondering if anyone had tried it, or looked into it?
 

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I actually just had a conversation about it with a body shop. Soda Blasting is expensive, but well worth it. As opposed to sand blasting which leaves small amounts of silicate that must be carefully cleaned off because paint doesn't stick well to it. Soda blasting leaves a this coating that is easily washed off, but protects the metal from rusting until the first coat of paint can be applied. At least that's what I was told. sounds right though.

It's going to take a whole lot of baking soda boxes to finish the job though :)
 

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70's Opeler, back 4 more!
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I'm buyin' stock in Arm & Hammer!...(this should bring the economy outta the dump...)
 

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Code Goober
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've done a little more invesitgating (very little more actually), and it looks as if one of the ways this is actually done is using a pressure washer. This seems like a neat thing to try (I've got a pressure washer, and an old ....well, I'd say hulk, but Opels are rather diminutive..). Just have to find a place that sells baking soda in economy sizes :-0.
 

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SODA?

Geek,
We have blasted a few hundred trucks with soda, I would not recommend it. Why you ask? The soda will be forced in to areas that you can not clean out. Then this soda , after you have painted it will continue to BLEED out of your car. Thus is looks like caca.:D
I would suggest media blasting with walnut and sand mix that will not warp the panels and will remove all paint, but you will need to disassemble the car to do so.
Moral to the story......aint no easy way to do things right.
We now blast with the walnut mix and have great results.
Bob:D
 

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Code Goober
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info. First hand information was exactly what I was looking for.
 

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I own a Snap-On blasting gun (hand held type). I use soda in it quite often. I have a big 60# bag of it, I have not ever used it on a body. I use it for blasting old parts and other such items. I blasted a set of wheels before painting them. I can tell you that soda is VERY soft. So yes, you could blast a car without removing the glass or trim. In fact it is so soft that I have seen it used to take paint off of a body one layer at a time. I takes much longer, but is easier on the body. Another advantage to soda is that unlike sand, even a beginer can do it without worry of overheating/warping of body panels. However then you have the issue of cleaning it out of every crack and crevice on the car. Walnut shells have their advantages also. I think it all boils down to personal preference and application!
 

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soda blasting

:) I have soda blasted small parts of my gt it works grate.
It only removes paint and leaves a smooth finish
:( the down side is.
It's very expensive
And if you leave any residue at all the paint will not stick and the part will rust.
in the long run it's better to use meadia.
 

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soda blasting works well, but like brother bob said it is a pain to clean and it does bleed through if you don't get it. Walnut shell and grit is a good usage, and its cheaper. and cheap is the way to go to get the same thing done.....
 

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Just curious if anyone here has used Glass Grit to strip the paint off their car? I work at Princess Auto (an industrial/farm/tool shop) and we sell all kinds of different sandblasting equipment. The choice in media there is Silica Sand, Glass Grit, Glass Beads and Aluminum Oxide (going up in price from the former to the latter). In the product documentation, it states that the sand should only be used for cast iron and heavy steel parts because of it's tendency to heat the material being blasted. It goes on to say that the glass grit is the best choice for automotive/boat paint stripping since it acts like sand, but doesn't create near as much heat.

I'm getting an air compressor for Christmas here and will probably pick up a sandblasting gun from work soon. Is glass grit the way to go?
 

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Opel Key Master
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media blasting

be careful in setting your air pressue. this can warp body panels. especially the hood due to underneath bracing. use lower pressure and spray at an angle
keith
 

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WEAR A RESPRIATOR... blast media can hurt or kill you if you breathe enough of it.
Glass bead .....I normally mix it with sand and watch the pressures not to warp anything.:D
 

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Opeler
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Soda blasting

Getting ready to sandblast the front suspension on my GT and start blasting the body on my 1954 Chevy Belair. I'm curious to try some bicarbonate (baking soda) in my blaster especially for the sheet metal blasting that I need to do.

I know that a traditional pressurized sandblaster probably won't work quite as well with bicarbonate as the custom soda-blast equipment, but I have a feeling that it might work well enough if I regulate things correctly.

1. Has anyone tried this?
2. Any idea where to buy bicarbonate in bulk?

Sounds like they make a blast-grade bicarbonate with larger particles, but that might just be a marketing gimmick.
 

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boomerang opeler
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do a search for soda blasting it was talked about over the last 1-1/2 years :)
 

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Opeler
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Stupid me. I've been Googling "soda blast" all day and only searched "sandblast" here. Lost track of my searches I suppose.

Thanks!
 

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boomerang opeler
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i take it that any one who has to ask where to get large quantitys of media is thinking of home blasting
if so unless you have the mother of all home compressors then you will find that it is cheaper and simpler to use a fine grit or a husk medium (walnut/coconut husk) the speeds in a home unit when used properly just dont get up enough heat to worry about
yes they will if you are trying to do a stubborn bit but just let it cool and go back
you dont have to strip it all in 1 pass :)
and remember to keep an angle of attack so the media does not cut in
if you want a smooth finish a husk medium will do it just fine
just dont stop in 1 place as that will heat it up
also think of how to recover the media as it all cost money
when doing a full car then large sheets of polypropylene sheets are good if you make a frame and cover all the car [ double under the car is better for pick up
think of how you are going to do it
a small gun with a pot will take till next christmas
(and can i be the first to wish you all a merry christmas for 2005 :D )
but if you take the pot of you can run a hose straght into the bag of medium
and a white disposable bunny suit from a paint shop supply place is a must as the media will get every where and you just dont want to be wiping your butt with that stuff in it :eek:
 
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