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Discussion Starter #1
Just pulled the intake/exhaust manifold. Next step was to drain coolant and remove plug on right side of engine to avoid coolant in cylinders.

Can someone share a picture of where this plug is?

Thanks.
 

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Über Genius
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Just pulled the intake/exhaust manifold. Next step was to drain coolant and remove plug on right side of engine to avoid coolant in cylinders.

Can someone share a picture of where this plug is?

Thanks.
There's a coolant drain plug?

I've always just disconnected the hose at the bottom of the radiator.
 

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Opeler
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From the oil pressure sending unit, go up two inches and aft an inch and a half.
Not recommendated to remove coolant drain plug while engine is in vehicle. Probably seized up.
https://www.opelgt.com/forums/6a-engine-mechanical/94433-block-drain-plug-location.html#post1202329

As noted in Post #2:
I've always just disconnected the hose at the bottom of the radiator.

More confusion:
https://www.opelgt.com/forums/opel-tips-tricks/17319-dreaded-block-coolant-drain-plug-removal-replacement.html#post162853
https://www.opelgt.com/forums/6b-cooling-system/10166-seized-engine-block-drain-plug-danger-removing.html
 

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Discussion Starter #4
From the oil pressure sending unit, go up two inches and aft an inch and a half.
Not recommendated to remove coolant drain plug while engine is in vehicle. Probably seized up.
https://www.opelgt.com/forums/6a-engine-mechanical/94433-block-drain-plug-location.html#post1202329

As noted in Post #2:
I've always just disconnected the hose at the bottom of the radiator.

More confusion:
https://www.opelgt.com/forums/opel-tips-tricks/17319-dreaded-block-coolant-drain-plug-removal-replacement.html#post162853
https://www.opelgt.com/forums/6b-cooling-system/10166-seized-engine-block-drain-plug-danger-removing.html

Cool thanks. I did see that plug when cleaning the side of the block with the manifold off. I think I’ll just drain at hose.
 

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Yup, that sums it up.
 

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RunOpel
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I too have always just opened the radiator drain cock and then remove the lower hose. Why is it recommended not draining
the coolant from the engine plug?
Dan
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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Discussed in the link in post #3. I too have never removed any of these plugs.

Also, if you do not have it, you will need an 8mm 12 point internal star bit for the 3 bolts holding on the cam sprocket. There are notches cast on the camshaft and you want to turn the engine over until those notches line up with IIRC 3 of the head bolts over on the driver's side. YOu do that before removing the cam sprocket.

And you will need a 12 mm 12 point internal star bit for the head bolts.

You may also need a need valve cover gasket and a triangular gasket for the front cover on the head where you access the cam sprocket bolts.

Get some RTV, either black or blue, and put a skim coat on the short tube top and bottom and on the rectangular area around the timing chain on the head gasket just before you drop it into place. A 'skim' coat is so than that it just looks wet.
 

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Opeler
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I too have always just opened the radiator drain cock and then remove the lower hose. Why is it recommended not draining
the coolant from the engine plug?
Dan
I think the consensus is that you will most likely strip the drain plug than remove it, and then you can either leave it that way or extract it, which is not convenient to do within the confines of the engine compartment.

Bill
 

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Opeler
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:thinking: Does this still apply for sealing head gasket?

From: Robert Legere [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Friday, October 03, 2003 5:11 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: Re: Early 1.9 (10-bolt head) question . . .

*****Even though they say NOT to use it, I use Permatex Spray copper sealer on the head gasket surface (Felpro). I spray both sides with one light coat...let dry...another light coat...let dry. Then I apply RTV sealer/ gasket maker (grey or black) to the front area of the gasket, where it meets the timing cover. A thin layer, about .050"-.060" thick I'd say, but uniform in thickness. Both sides of gasket. Let dry for 15-20 minutes, so it has 'skinned' appreciably on the outside, but the center is still 'gooey' and compliant.

Finally, apply third coat of copper spray sealer, but a bit heavier. Immediately place gasket on block, install head, and torque down. I torque to 25, then 50, then 72, and finally to 73 .... amazing how many of those bolts are already at 73, and how others need a 1/4 turn to hit 73 .... block distortion and all that!

Don't forget water jacket o-ring ... that goes without saying! The copper sealer ensures NO water leaks or oil leaks from 'normal' passages, and the sealer at the front keeps the oil leaks to a minimum, if at all.

Allowing the RTV to skin is critical, if it's wet it just oozes out and there's no 'tension' on the seal. FWIW, this is my technique I've used for years, and it has served me well for both street and race.

Never had a 'weeper' this way, just the normal oil 'mist' that all engines get over time, but no liquid oil running down the timing cover anyway.Prep work goes without saying, I clean the head gasket before applying sealer, and the block and head too, with brake clean solvent (no residue).

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That looks better. Now I need to turn what to line up what before removing the star bolts?
 

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Opel Rallier since 1977
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:ugh:
That does not look great
Not surprised.... some of the coolant leaking has gone inside the engine. The gunk inside the valve cover is from that. There may also be some waxy gunk around the rocker adjusting nuts.

You very much need to drain and change the oil NOW, and, when you drain it, just ease the drain plug out so you can see how much coolant/water, comes out. Put in fresh cheap oil and change the filter. Run it 5 miles after the head gasket replacement then change, the oil and filter again.... run another 15-20 miles and then change oil and filter AGAIN. I've done more involved processes to get water out, including repeated washes with alcohol and then diesel.

Turn the crank with a 19 mm wrench on the crank pulley bolt with the car in neutral, or bump the car in 4th gear with a manual trans to get the engine to turn. You might be able to bump the engine with short bursts on the starter. The goal is to turn the camshaft to a certain position.

Peer down into the holes for accessing the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th head bolts on the driver's side. The will be partially blocked by the camshaft. As you rotate the cam a bit at a time, you will eventually see some notches or indentations come into view on the cam as you peer down into those holes. Line those up so those 3 head bolts have a clear path to come up and out.

Sequence after that:
- Loosen the timing chain tensioner on the right side of the timing cover; this is a 22 mm hex head; back out 'til loose.
- There is a nylon button threaded into the center of the front of the cam with a hex shape. You access that and the cam sprocket bolts through the triangular front cover on the head. Unscrew that nylon button (may take a socket), then remove the cam sprocket bolts.
- Slip the cam sprocket off the front of the cam and let it rest on the little shelf below; don't allow it to slip in the chain.
- And only THEN loosen the 10 head bolts.

Reverse that order. When you re-install that button, tighten it as tight as you can by hand only. Double check cam timing per procedures just in case the cam or cam sprockets have slipped on you.
 

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Über Genius
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With that much moisture inside the valve cover, I want to see the chamber side of the head and urge you to get the head magnafluxed
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The goal is to turn the camshaft to a certain position.

Peer down into the holes for accessing the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th head bolts on the driver's side. The will be partially blocked by the camshaft. As you rotate the cam a bit at a time, you will eventually see some notches or indentations come into view on the cam as you peer down into those holes. Line those up so those 3 head bolts have a clear path to come up and out.
Anyone have a picture of this? I think I have it but wanted to check.

Thanks
 
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