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Discussion Starter #1
Okay what is the trick? I am working on the brakes on my 1969 GT and cannot get the hub assembly back on the spindle correctly. The castle nut is too far out and the hole for the cotter pin is covered by the nut. The top of the castle nut is flush with the end of the spindle. It should have a good 4-5 threads clear once the nut is in place.

Here is the procedure I tried;I replaced the inner seal, cleaned and repacked the inner bearing and tapped them into the hub. I then put the hub and rotor on the spindle and then put the outer bearing in place, then the thrust washer then the nut. Spinning the rotor, I tightened the nut until it stopped the rotor and then backed the nut off 1/2 turn. The hole for the cotter pin is barely visible and will not fit the cotter pin. The bearings are in great condition and the spindle seem to have no issues.

See photos. Any idea what I am doing wrong.
 

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Opeler
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Okay what is the trick? I am working on the brakes on my 1969 GT and cannot get the hub assembly back on the spindle correctly. The castle nut is too far out and the hole for the cotter pin is covered by the nut. The top of the castle nut is flush with the end of the spindle. It should have a good 4-5 threads clear once the nut is in place.

Here is the procedure I tried;I replaced the inner seal, cleaned and repacked the inner bearing and tapped them into the hub. I then put the hub and rotor on the spindle and then put the outer bearing in place, then the thrust washer then the nut. Spinning the rotor, I tightened the nut until it stopped the rotor and then backed the nut off 1/2 turn. The hole for the cotter pin is barely visible and will not fit the cotter pin. The bearings are in great condition and the spindle seem to have no issues.

See photos. Any idea what I am doing wrong.
That bearing is definitely standing too far out so, the races may not be completely seated. Take the bearings out and tap all around the races with a hammer and drift pin or flat bottomed punch to make sure they are bottomed out in the hub. If the races are seated ok, then about the only other thing that it could be is that the new seal may be wrong and/or not be fully seating on the spindle. Also, it may be the angle of the photo or the light, but the bearing almost looks like the taper is reversed.
 

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I agree with SpringGT. It looks like the outer bearing is in backwards but I also think that is impossible because I don't think it would go into the hub at all if it was. Backing the nut off a half turn after tightening is too much and/or not an accurate way to do the process. Tighten the nut while rotating the assembly until it starts to drag pretty heavily, don't sock it up tight like you were bolting something together. Back the nut off until it's loose and then do it again. Doing it twice or even three times helps insure that all the components are seated and concentric. After the first process is complete back the nut off one castle at a time and check the rotation. You want it to spin nicely but not be at all loose, I mean not loose even a few thousandths of an inch. The rotor should spin but not like a roulette wheel, it should not keep going more than about 1 turn after you spin it. When you think you have it right grab the rotor with both hands and try to rock it back and forth on the axle; it should not rock at all and you should not be able to feel anything loose. The only danger here is if you leave the bearings too tight they could overheat so be careful but I have never had a problem in 50 years doing it this way. The only other thing that might keep you from getting yours back together is too much grease. If you pack it solid it will be very difficult to get the bearings to seat all the way unless you really crank on the nut to squeeze all the grease out first and then do what I described above.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Fixed!

Thanks for the feedback, I ran out before work and checked it. I was putting the outer bearing on backward, the taper was sloping to the end of the spindle. I reversed it and the bearing moved about 1/4”. The cotter pin goes in no problem. Tonight I will take my time and get the preload set proper.
 

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Opeler
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Thanks for the feedback, I ran out before work and checked it. I was putting the outer bearing on backward, the taper was sloping to the end of the spindle. I reversed it and the bearing moved about 1/4”. The cotter pin goes in no problem. Tonight I will take my time and get the preload set proper.
Glad to see that it was an easy fix. You also might want to inspect the bearing before final installation, to ensure that you didn't crush the bearing cage or mar the surface of the race by installing it backward. You probably didn't, but it is worth a check before buttoning it up.
 

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Okay what is the trick? I am working on the brakes on my 1969 GT and cannot get the hub assembly back on the spindle correctly. The castle nut is too far out and the hole for the cotter pin is covered by the nut. The top of the castle nut is flush with the end of the spindle. It should have a good 4-5 threads clear once the nut is in place.

Here is the procedure I tried;I replaced the inner seal, cleaned and repacked the inner bearing and tapped them into the hub. I then put the hub and rotor on the spindle and then put the outer bearing in place, then the thrust washer then the nut. Spinning the rotor, I tightened the nut until it stopped the rotor and then backed the nut off 1/2 turn. The hole for the cotter pin is barely visible and will not fit the cotter pin. The bearings are in great condition and the spindle seem to have no issues.

See photos. Any idea what I am doing wrong.
I agree with them also bearing is sitting out way to far. Make sure the seal is correct and going all the way to the rear of the spindle seal surface. Inspect the races in the hub assembly. They should be seated against the hub internal machined race land. If you had the bearing races out they may not be seated. They shouldn’t move once seated also. They can get worn and spin causing damage to the hub assembly but this isn’t common unless a lack of lubrication. You should be able to borrow a race installer tool from you local auto parts center to set the races completely and straight.
 
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