Opel GT Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

· Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I'm once again in need of your advice. This morning, as I was warming up the car, I walked around the back of the car and I noticed 2 fuel drips. One is from the hard steel line and the other from the rubber line right next to the steel line. I investigated it for a short time but being that I was in a rush to get to work, I didn't come to any conclusions other than that I have 2 leaks.

I need advice on how to tackle that area. I looked from inside the car and I couldn't see any access to that area. Now I can't even remember if it was leaking from the tank side or from the other side of the line. I'll inspect it more tonight. But if the leak is at the tank side, how do I get to it?

Thanks,

Manny
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,344 Posts
Manny, you could have a rusted steel line and it's finally gone clear through the line. The other rubber line is the tank vent line that goes to the charcoal cannister in front of the radiator. OGTS has replacement steel lines and the rubber boot that covers the hole for that line. It is replaceable from outside the car, at least on my 72 GT it is. If you need to remove the fuel tank or gain access you have to remove the spare tire floor board and attaching metal structures. HTH.
 

· Member
Joined
·
2,054 Posts
Before you go thinking you've got a major repair, start with the most probabilistic, simplistic cause; bad connection(s). Most likely, the rubber connector is cracked due to age. Replace the rubber portions, and use some good new clamps. Check for leaks. If one connection is bad due to age, chances are all the others are nearing their age limit also. So spend the weekend and replace them all. And you might as well use new fuel & vent lines.

If you still suspect the tank is leaking, lift the vinyl cover to access the spare tire storage area. Sniff. Smell any fuel fumes? Try again near any openings that go down to where the tank is. If it's a weak smell, it might just be residual odor from the rubber connections and/or lines you just replaced, so wait a day or two and try again.

If the smell remains strong, better tackle it quick. The electricals back there are not explosion-proof by any stretch of the imagination.

FYI - An acquaintance just burned his Porsche at the track because he had a static spark while he fueled up after a practice run. Car's saved, but he got scorched, and he's got to re-paint his car.
 

· Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
namba209 said:
OGTS has replacement steel lines and the rubber boot that covers the hole for that line. It is replaceable from outside the car, at least on my 72 GT it is. HTH.
When you say "it is replaceable from outside the car", are you referring to the steel line? And yes, my rubber boot is totally fried. I think it would crumble if I touch it. Is that the problem...the rubber boot?

Again, I didn't study the problem very long because I was running late this morning. Also, if the other rubber line goes to the charcoal canister, then why would I have a leak there?
 

· Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
West Coast GT said:
Before you go thinking you've got a major repair, start with the most probabilistic, simplistic cause; bad connection(s). Most likely, the rubber connector is cracked due to age. Replace the rubber portions, and use some good new clamps. Check for leaks. If one connection is bad due to age, chances are all the others are nearing their age limit also. So spend the weekend and replace them all. And you might as well use new fuel & vent lines.

If you still suspect the tank is leaking, lift the vinyl cover to access the spare tire storage area. Sniff. Smell any fuel fumes? Try again near any openings that go down to where the tank is. If it's a weak smell, it might just be residual odor from the rubber connections and/or lines you just replaced, so wait a day or two and try again.

If the smell remains strong, better tackle it quick. The electricals back there are not explosion-proof by any stretch of the imagination.

FYI - An acquaintance just burned his Porsche at the track because he had a static spark while he fueled up after a practice run. Car's saved, but he got scorched, and he's got to re-paint his car.
An acquaintance of mine just had his Ferrari go up in flames this past weekend. It sounds like a fuel line came loose in the engine bay. So that's why I left the car at home today. I don't suspect the tank. There are no odors from inside the car. I'll have a better idea of the situation tonight.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,344 Posts
Yes, I was referring to the steel line being replaceable from under the car. The replacement from OGTS has a new fitting, compression sleeve, and the new line. If the old steel line is leaking, fuel can run out the vent line hole also, they are in close proximity to each other. A good point was made to double check the rubber attachments, I would also add that when time permits, change all the vent lines on the tank and filler neck if they are still the old solid plastic lines. A point of caution here is to make sure you put the "T" fittings in thier original place if you do opt to change the vent lines. And I would also get a new boot for the steel line hole in the body. JMTCW.
 

· Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
namba209 said:
Yes, I was referring to the steel line being replaceable from under the car. The replacement from OGTS has a new fitting, compression sleeve, and the new line. If the old steel line is leaking, fuel can run out the vent line hole also, they are in close proximity to each other. A good point was made to double check the rubber attachments, I would also add that when time permits, change all the vent lines on the tank and filler neck if they are still the old solid plastic lines. A point of caution here is to make sure you put the "T" fittings in thier original place if you do opt to change the vent lines. And I would also get a new boot for the steel line hole in the body. JMTCW.
Thanks Ron. That sounds like what's happening on my car. But I'll check it out tonight.

Manny
 

· Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
namba209 said:
Manny, you could have a rusted steel line and it's finally gone clear through the line. The other rubber line is the tank vent line that goes to the charcoal cannister in front of the radiator. OGTS has replacement steel lines and the rubber boot that covers the hole for that line. It is replaceable from outside the car, at least on my 72 GT it is. If you need to remove the fuel tank or gain access you have to remove the spare tire floor board and attaching metal structures. HTH.
Hi Ron (or anyone else who can advise),

I got the replacement steel line and rubber boot from OGTS. But they didn't mention that I'd have to bend the line myself. I was expecting it to just be a straight remove/replace operation. Sounds like I need a tube bender. Are they readily available at any hardware store? How much? Are they easy to use? Should I attempt it myself?

And also, what tool will I need to remove the old line? I haven't removed the old line yet so I haven't looked at what's inside the access hole. Also, I have to figure out what to do with a FULL tank of gas.

Any advice would be appreciated. TIA,

Manny
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,344 Posts
Manny, your question caused me to dig through all my stuff to find the new line and fittings I got from OGTS and check it out. My new line is also straight and appears to be thick wall copper tubing and could be bent by hand using a fair amount of pressure over a large radius. If you try to bend it in a shorter radius, it will kink. For me a straight line poses no problem, I've got to attach the line to a filter, then a fuel pump, then a filter again for the SFI V-6 going in the GT. Tubing benders are reasonable at you local auto parts store, or some could be rented, depending on the store. Just be sure you don't try for too short a radius in the line. For your full tank of gas, get a big container or two that will hold 12 gallons of gas and once you take the line off the tank it will all come out. The "B-nut" the line is attached to is a 17MM and the fitting/union in the tank is a 19mm, or vice versa, I didn't pay that much attention. Once the line is removed with the "B-nut" the fitting/union is accessible with a socket. HTH. :)
 

· Old Opeler
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
Advice is Cheap ......

Tube benders of the wound spring type that the tube is slid inside before bending are available at most DIY hardware stores. Lever type devices are available too at greater cost. May be you have a Plumber or Gas Fitter in your local circle of aquaintances too - either should be able to help with tube bending - a beer or two usually gets a wee job done!

For sure you are going to have to get the gas out of the tank before undoing anything - there is somewhere near 15 gallons in a full tank so if you siphon or drain it into 4-gallon jerry cans you will need four of them.

The tube should be held in with a compression fitting nut that can be undone with an ordinary ring spanner of the correct size (which escapes me at the moment - it's an age thing ...... :eek: ).

Refer to the "fuel sock" thread that you, Ron & I posted to some time ago too as this may be the perfect opportunity to get that fixed and an inline fuel filter fitted. That is where the fuel line goes into the tank - just below the fuel sock.
 

· Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update...

OK, so I go out to the car and start her up so I can investigate my leaking problem. And guess what...NO LEAKS!!! I let her idle for about 10 minutes. Still NO LEAKS. So I drive her around for about 20 minutes. And still NO LEAKS!

I think my car has miraculously fixed herself. I'm not complaining but I don't know if I trust the situation. At least I haven't gone out and bought a tube bender.

I think I'll drive her until the tank gets low and then replace at least the rubber boot.

Anyways, I thought you all might find this interesting. Thanks for all the help.

Manny
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,344 Posts
Manny, if you're gonna open the line to replace the rubber boot, why not replace the line and fittings too? Look hard and close at the line, if it is severely rusted change it. It is too close to the exhaust to take a chance IMHO.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top