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Über Genius
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8,966 Posts
I've heard the horror stories but let gas sit, unstabilized for a year or more on many occasions.
My bike went almost two years. Runs fine. Been riding it last two weeks.
 

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Can Opeler
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3,320 Posts
I've heard the horror stories but let gas sit, unstabilized for a year or more on many occasions.
My bike went almost two years. Runs fine. Been riding it last two weeks.
Yeah I’ve run sport four wheelers on 4 year old gas with no stabilizers with no issues. Just gave it the ol smell test. I’ve started up old farm trucks that hadn’t been run in years on old gas too. The only thing I’ve ever had issues with is build up in idle jets on Weber DCOEs when ethanol fuel sits awhile. The main jets on four wheelers and mowers sometimes get a little build up because they are so small, but that can usually be cleared up by covering up the intake and turning the engine a couple times.
 
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Opel Rallier since 1977
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1,712 Posts
Yep and sometimes it will work out OK. But sometimes it won't. And the old gas made many in years past would not go bad nearly as fast the new stuff does so the old farm tuck story is gonna be true sometimes... but sometimes those old farm trucks and machines never start on that old fuel, and people forget that. The emissions mandates and the summer-winter fuels mandated by the EPA in some regions has changed the fuels.

Pull some of that old gas and look at it.. how yellow it has turned is how oxidized it is. And Eric's fuel tank with the gum is obviously the ethanol separation + water problem. If you are in a dry region of the USA, then you won't see that particular problem as readily.

I've had a Jeep engine break a rocker arm due to old oxidized/varnished gas; when fuel gets really old and badly oxidized/varnished, then it can gum on the hot intake valve stems and make them jam open; that was what happened on my Jeep 151 within 50 miles after I dumped in some old gas from my Saab 99! I have another on-line acquaintance who had the same thing happen. And I've had a couple of Stihl carbs and a Honda generator carb have to be replaced due to the gumming; those particular small carbs have very, very fine passages in them that can easily be clogged with the ethanol+water gum.

So just because it does not happen all the time on particular carbs and systems, or that it never happned to your machinery, does not mean it does not happen. If it all keeps working for you, that is good. But don't think it does not happen or is not a problem. It can be hard to believe.... until it happens.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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14,402 Posts
With all my Opel projects and failures these past 12 years, I've had gas go stale many times. Fortunately, the color change that happens to the gas is a good indicator. When it turns reddish, throw it away. That happens in about 3 months to untreated gas.
 

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Opeler
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920 Posts
Discussion Starter #245
I should probably provide an update as to what has been discovered and what the plan is going forward:

Valve springs:
I have spoken with the guy who assembled my motor and learned that the machine shop was the one that installed the valves and springs. He verified that rotators weren't installed in the exhaust pockets. I ended up bringing the car back to my house instead of keeping it there waiting on parts to arrive. So, I have been in contact with a fellow Opeler that helped me understand what to look for and how to take some measurements of installed height of the valve springs. Upon taking measurements, my springs heights are vastly different between the exhaust and intake, which means when the shop didn't install rotators, they didn't install any shims to make up the difference. I'm not sure what they put where at this point. I finally received the package I was supposed to receive on 7/6, but didn't get until 7/27 (thanks for nothing USPS) that included some 2.2/2.4 valve springs that are stronger than stock. Tests have been done on these springs to verify that they will work with the cam I currently have in the motor.

What's next:
I am planning to use the cam I currently have in the motor, I don't see the point of abandoning something that I haven't really gotten to experience yet. I mean, since the motor was rebuilt, Ive driven the car less than 100 miles and in that timeframe I have dealt with 4 vacuum leaks, improperly installed valve springs, ignition timing issues, bad pump jet on a carb, improperly tuned & balanced carbs (which the spring failures further complicated!) just to name a few. So, I'd like to experience this camshaft in my motor at its best before making a decision to go in another cam direction. How am I going to make the car its best? By installing the proper valve springs in the correct manner and then installing a Sniper EFI unit.

I've got the Sniper unit here now and many of the other ancillary pieces for the installation. You have seen that I just had my tank cleaned up and I'm about to install an in-tank fuel pump for the EFI set up. I'm installing a Sniper Retrofit unit, which requires me to cut a small hole in the tank and it installs with a self locking flange, and even can be used with tanks with ribs up to .28" without flattening the metal or filling it in. Once this is all installed this will give me the best possible situation to evaluate the cam choice.

Eric
 
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