Opel GT Forum banner
21 - 40 of 62 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
850 Posts
Hey, you're welding already, good for you.

If you're going to keep working on your GT, you should probably start practicing welding sheet metal. Get an old washing machine or dryer, cut a rectangle out of it, and practice trying to weld it back into place.

It's good work to do yourself because it takes a lot of time, but you don't have to ask a lot of questions from adults about it.

When you're happy with your welding, then start chopping out the rusty sections and welding in your new panels.
 

·
Registered
The Young One
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Hey, you're welding already, good for you.

If you're going to keep working on your GT, you should probably start practicing welding sheet metal. Get an old washing machine or dryer, cut a rectangle out of it, and practice trying to weld it back into place.

It's good work to do yourself because it takes a lot of time, but you don't have to ask a lot of questions from adults about it.

When you're happy with your welding, then start chopping out the rusty sections and welding in your new panels.
I have done a little bit of practicing withy scrap metal, but I definitely need more practice. I think this spring we will be figuring out the wiring and then start doing metal work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
850 Posts
I have done a little bit of practicing withy scrap metal, but I definitely need more practice. I think this spring we will be figuring out the wiring and then start doing metal work.
You can do both at the same time, unless your evenings are busy.

Spend 20 minutes welding a day. You don't need anyone's help to do it. It's not going to cost much for consumables, most of your time is setup and jigging and then wondering how to fix your mistakes.

One of the things about learning a skill that they usually don't tell you in school, there's not as much of it that's conscious as you might think, maybe not even the majority of it. When you make an effort to solve a puzzle and then stop, your brain continues trying to solve it in the background without you knowing. Think of your conscious self as absorbing data and your subconscious as processing it. You can do both at once but your brain gets confused about what task it's supposed to be doing if you do. Stopping the process of absorbing new info and just letting it shake its way into making sense is probably the easiest and laziest way to learn. Sleep is a huge portion of this. 20 minutes at a task a day for 3 days is way better than 60 minutes in a row. There's a few things that work the opposite way, where you never get better until you really bunker down and immerse yourself in them, but welding's not that challenging of a task.

It's better to get better at something when you don't need to, than when it's time to already be using that skill.

Just food for thought.
 

·
Registered
The Young One
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
You can do both at the same time, unless your evenings are busy.

Spend 20 minutes welding a day. You don't need anyone's help to do it. It's not going to cost much for consumables, most of your time is setup and jigging and then wondering how to fix your mistakes.

One of the things about learning a skill that they usually don't tell you in school, there's not as much of it that's conscious as you might think, maybe not even the majority of it. When you make an effort to solve a puzzle and then stop, your brain continues trying to solve it in the background without you knowing. Think of your conscious self as absorbing data and your subconscious as processing it. You can do both at once but your brain gets confused about what task it's supposed to be doing if you do. Stopping the process of absorbing new info and just letting it shake its way into making sense is probably the easiest and laziest way to learn. Sleep is a huge portion of this. 20 minutes at a task a day for 3 days is way better than 60 minutes in a row. There's a few things that work the opposite way, where you never get better until you really bunker down and immerse yourself in them, but welding's not that challenging of a task.

It's better to get better at something when you don't need to, than when it's time to already be using that skill.

Just food for thought.
The only problem is that the GT is at my grandparents house And I don’t have a welder at my house. I also don’t have my license since I will be turning 15 in December. I have been wanting a welder for a while now but they are kind of expensive.
 

·
Can Opeler
Joined
·
3,937 Posts

·
Registered
The Young One
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·

·
Registered
The Young One
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
No. Only flux core. Mig welders cost much more. Flux core does the job just as good. It just requires more cleanup than mig.
I will have to think about it. I don’t really want to spend that much money because I am working on my 1974 Yamaha Mx100 and I am having the cylinder bored out and I bought a new piston for it. I also need a new brake booster and master cylinder on the GT, and I am trying to buy a 1991 honda prelude si from my 80 year old neighbor(which will be my daily driver). I also want to get my great uncles blue gt that is in way better condition than mine but has been sitting for 30 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,301 Posts
OR
 

·
Registered
The Young One
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·

·
Can Opeler
Joined
·
3,937 Posts
Those prices are a lot better. The mig one isn’t that bad either.
They are also not very good welders. The century one I linked will out weld both of those. I’ve personally used all three of these welders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,301 Posts
potatoes, patotoes I was giving him a cheaper alternative to practice at home, not become a pro overnight.
I've had these two for at least ten yrs and they have worked just fine for me on just about everything I needed - aluminum :cry:
Gas Audio equipment Machine Electrical wiring Electronic device
Electronic instrument Audio equipment Electrical wiring Gas Machine
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,562 Posts
Do you guys think that a used welder is a choice? Or should I just get a new welder?
I’d rather get a used ‘good’ welder than a new crappy welder.

I bought my TIG welder used. I traded in my old TIG Welder so it cost me $2800 (it would have been $5200 new).

I’ve welded with some underwhelming new machines that cost almost as much as my used machine, but with very little reserve capacity. I’ve never maxed mine out (310 amp output, 80 amp input) but I have melted a few wall outlets.
 

·
Registered
The Young One
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I’d rather get a used ‘good’ welder than a new crappy welder.

I bought my TIG welder used. I traded in my old TIG Welder so it cost me $2800 (it would have been $5200 new).

I’ve welded with some underwhelming new machines that cost almost as much as my used machine, but with very little reserve capacity. I’ve never maxed mine out (310 amp output, 80 amp input) but I have melted a few wall outlets.
I didn’t know that tig welders cost that much:eek:

I might have to look on facebook marketplace.
 
21 - 40 of 62 Posts
Top