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Thanks so much!!!! I talked to my grandpa tonight and it sounds like we are going to do the major body work like the rust and get it running and driving so it is like a daily driver. I don't have that much money to do a full blown restoration so I am going to do a decent one. When I have enough money and I am older(I am 14) i will restore it the proper way. I am probably going to buy a 1990-1991 Honda Prelude Si for my daily driver($500) and I am still looking to buy my great uncles other Gt a 1971-1972 Gt. I am still saving my money for these opportunities.
How much did your paint job cost? My grandpa and I were looking at the correct paint and It was around $100 a quart. So my grandpa thinks it would be around $300 to paint it. We might just use rustoleum spray paint. That is what my grandpa used on his spitfire and so far it looks good.

Thanks Sam
The cost can depend on the color. When I had my GT done, the restoration shop told me that yellow tends to be the priciest. A metallic will also be more expensive. Also depends on what type of product you use. Base coat-clear coat will often be more expensive than single stage urethane. Each has advantages and disadvantages. I think Rustoleum rattle can is the last option, maybe even lower. Find a local auto body shop supplier and pick his brains.
 

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1969 Opel Gt 1.9 Automatic
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
The cost can depend on the color. When I had my GT done, the restoration shop told me that yellow tends to be the priciest. A metallic will also be more expensive. Also depends on what type of product you use. Base coat-clear coat will often be more expensive than single stage urethane. Each has advantages and disadvantages. I think Rustoleum rattle can is the last option, maybe even lower. Find a local auto body shop supplier and pick his brains.
I want to paint it the original color silver. My grandpa is going to see what the local body shop costs for that paint.
 

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1969 Opel Gt 1.9 Automatic
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Here is a youtube video of us pulling the Gt out of the barn.
 

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1969 Opel Gt 1.9 Automatic
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Lots of excitement! When was this car parked? How's the varmint situation?🦝
The tries are from 1996 and they are almost brand new so we think maybe 1997-1999. There has not been any animals that we can see that were in the car the interior is in amazing condition. The only animal tracks are the ones over the car and a turd on top of the car.
 

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That was pretty cool. 20+ years of stuff trying to block it in but the Opel came out.
 
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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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FYI: Back in the 90's I painted a GT with 24 cans of rattle can yellow Rustoleum. 3 coats total over the whole exterior. 6 months later it started turning to dust. No amount of waxing would stop the paint from oxidizing to dust. Had to have Maaco repaint it. Now, granted, it was old school, low tech, 90's Rustoleum. Modern paints are much better. Maaco adds a hardener and a sunscreen to the paint, I don't know if this is common in other body shop paint jobs.

Clear coat can be very beneficial. Eastwood makes a clear coat called "Diamond Clear" that is very good and a number of us use it. I've never used it on the body, but I use it to seal my painted engines and the various hardware under the car, like the suspension and drivetrain.
 

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1969 Opel Gt 1.9 Automatic
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
FYI: Back in the 90's I painted a GT with 24 cans of rattle can yellow Rustoleum. 3 coats total over the whole exterior. 6 months later it started turning to dust. No amount of waxing would stop the paint from oxidizing to dust. Had to have Maaco repaint it. Now, granted, it was old school, low tech, 90's Rustoleum. Modern paints are much better. Maaco adds a hardener and a sunscreen to the paint, I don't know if this is common in other body shop paint jobs.

Clear coat can be very beneficial. Eastwood makes a clear coat called "Diamond Clear" that is very good and a number of us use it. I've never used it on the body, but I use it to seal my painted engines and the various hardware under the car, like the suspension and drivetrain.
I think we are going to us rustolouem paint and us a spray gun to paint it. My grandpa did this and it worked amazing and was cheap.
 

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1970 Opel Gt - Purchased July 1972 - Chartreuse - restored - 3000 miles as of 02-16, 2021 -
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Recommend that you search the web on what is available out there, paint by the quart, and compare not only prices but quality - and no disrespect intended but keep in mind that you may look at this in a totally different way in just a few years. For example I took my 16 year old daughter out to look at used cars - well like a lot of 16 year olds she fell in love with every car she saw, 4 wheels and the freedom of owning a car was really all that she could see, at that point in time - so I steered her to the right choice which she was very happy with. Moral of the story listen to eveyone, do your own research and then make your decision, but with that said don't make it just based on $$. It is going to take you months to prepare this car for paint so in the mean time start saving money toward your paint or paint job. I know one thing for sure you need to be really happy with the finial results because if your aren't happy, well you will be doing it over again much sooner than you can imagine. Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Recommend that you search the web on what is available out there, paint by the quart, and compare not only prices but quality - and no disrespect intended but keep in mind that you may look at this in a totally different way in just a few years. For example I took my 16 year old daughter out to look at used cars - well like a lot of 16 year olds she fell in love with every car she saw, 4 wheels and the freedom of owning a car was really all that she could see, at that point in time - so I steered her to the right choice which she was very happy with. Moral of the story listen to eveyone, do your own research and then make your decision, but with that said don't make it just based on $$. It is going to take you months to prepare this car for paint so in the mean time start saving money toward your paint or paint job. I know one thing for sure you need to be really happy with the finial results because if your aren't happy, well you will be doing it over again much sooner than you can imagine. Good Luck
One day I will do a correct restoration on it when I have the time and money, but now I just want to get it running and driving. So we are going to do the body pretty good but not perfect. It will just kind of be a fun and learning car to work on.
 

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One day I will do a correct restoration on it when I have the time and money, but now I just want to get it running and driving.
I think that's the right spirit of it.

Nothing is as encouraging and motivating as a car that you can actually drive. Any project that's sitting and waiting for its perfect restoration, isn't bringing you joy.

Everything you love about it, you will love.
Everything you hate about it, you will be motivated to change.

It's very easy once you start taking it apart, for a "quick" project to turn into a 10 year project that you don't even care about anymore. I'd say that's 90% of people's car projects (and projects in general). You're seeing a survivorship bias of people who've stuck with it.

Making it nice is something that takes time to figure it all out, source and shop, and just to make decisions. Might as well have an uglier car you're driving around during that whole time. Plus, it's hard to figure out what you want to do to your car if you're not driving it. The things you'll want to prioritize will remind you about themselves every day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I think that's the right spirit of it.

Nothing is as encouraging and motivating as a car that you can actually drive. Any project that's sitting and waiting for its perfect restoration, isn't bringing you joy.

Everything you love about it, you will love.
Everything you hate about it, you will be motivated to change.

It's very easy once you start taking it apart, for a "quick" project to turn into a 10 year project that you don't even care about anymore. I'd say that's 90% of people's car projects (and projects in general). You're seeing a survivorship bias of people who've stuck with it.

Making it nice is something that takes time to figure it all out, source and shop, and just to make decisions. Might as well have an uglier car you're driving around during that whole time. Plus, it's hard to figure out what you want to do to your car if you're not driving it. The things you'll want to prioritize will remind you about themselves every day.
YES! That is one reason I just want to enjoy it! I won't be able to work on it all day for so many days a week, because the car isn't at my house. Your reasoning definitely sums up my reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Here is part 2 of the GT.
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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For a first car that you found in a rotten shed and which probably has rust issues that you haven't discovered yet, a quick fix is fine. You're a young guy and you want to have fun, not spend every weekend for a year in a garage working on a stupid car. My first 2 GT's were $100 rust buckets. When you're young you're going to make mistakes behind the wheel and ding up or wreck your first car(s). Better that you wreck one that you didn't put too much time and money into. The most important thing with these cars is to keep them in a garage as much as you can if you live in a moist part of the country. They don't like rain and morning dew and will rust like crazy if exposed regularly to that sort of stuff.
 

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Not every young person is out to kill their cars when they're young. I took pretty good care of my first GT. Yes, I had "some" fun with it but the first ding after paint almost made me cry. I didn't make the first ding. It was a parking lot A-hole that didn't bother to own their mistake.

Side note. I've loaded GTs onto trailers and tow dollies but never seen anyone use a winch. Either that GT has some serious friction in it's turney bits or you guys grossly overestimated how light these things are. Better safe than sorry, though.
 
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Here is part 2 of the GT.
When you speed up the time, look for an option called "Maintain Audio Pitch" or something like that. In Adobe Premiere it's right there with the speed/duration effect.

What it does is counteract the increased pitch caused by compressing the audio into a shorter time, by spreading it out again. That means you'll have faster video, without being narrated by chipmonks. 200% is easy for the brain to understand to a native English speaker, 300% is pushing it unless they have a deep voice or speak slower than average. Faster than that, at least the sounds won't sound funny, but the narration will still be incomprehensible.

Alternatively, you could not talk during the filming, and record a voice-over afterwards, but then this is a bit of extra work to combined files, synch up, etc.
 
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