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1969 Opel Gt 1.9 Automatic
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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
Hi guys I worked on the GT again yesterday. We got the caliper rebuild kits from rock auto. WE put the seals in and put new pistons in. We also put new o-rings in because we split the calipers. I know we aren't supposed to split them.

Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Also my grandpa and I tried to start it and it wouldn't start. My grandpa thinks the carb is gummed up. WE had to spray gas in the carb to get it to run. If we can't get the carb working good, we have been thinking about getting a weber 32/36 because I have heard they work good and they increase performance. Should I get this carb or stick with the stock solex?

Thanks Sam
 

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Also my grandpa and I tried to start it and it wouldn't start. My grandpa thinks the carb is gummed up. WE had to spray gas in the carb to get it to run. If we can't get the carb working good, we have been thinking about getting a weber 32/36 because I have heard they work good and they increase performance. Should I get this carb or stick with the stock solex?

Thanks Sam
Get the 32/36 on order now, it’s nearly a must have item for an Ope owner, especially in the beginning.
 

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I don't know where the idea that calipers should not be split came from. When I was working in a brake/alignment shop we rebuilt calipers every day and never had a problem.
 

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I don't know where the idea that calipers should not be split came from. When I was working in a brake/alignment shop we rebuilt calipers every day and never had a problem.

The Opel FSM clearly states not to split them.

The reason? Aftermarket seals for between the caliper halves were not available back then. Re-using the old seals meant they would leak. So, you didn’t do it.

With aftermarket seals available, that has obviously changed.
 

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Thanks Bob, I did not know that. Hard to understand why those parts were not available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
I've got the Redline version brand new in the box I'll sell you. Has the adapter for stock air cleaner. Hot water choke, I believe. I'm not going to use it so I may be able to save you a little bit of money.
How much?
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
So I went to my grandparent's house these last 3 days to work on the GT. My grandpa and I have done a lot to it! On the first day we installed the calipers and the new hoses and the new rear wheel cylinders. We also bled the brakes. At first my grandpa couldn't get any fluid out of the front calipers so we cleaned out the brake fluid resorvor and then the front brakes worked. Also I chipped up the brake drum a little bit by hitting it with a brass hammer try to get it off. But it didn't affect the part where the shoe goes. There were some oter chips missing so someone else must have had a hard time.
Then on the second day we installed a mitsubish electric fuel pump that was installed on the car. We got it working good and installed it right by the gas tank. We also put a fuel shut-off valve back there too. We then put a battery on the ground by the fuel pump to see if we could start the engine using the fuel pump and the actual gas tank. It started! We didn't have the fuel pump wired up yet.
The last day we wired up the fuel pump and I drove it around the yard with actual brakes! The only problem was that when you would push the brake pedal the brake pedal would stay to the floor and you would have to use your foot to lift it back up. Then my grandpa drove and I was the passenger for about 1-2 miles. My grandpa even took his hads off the steering wheel and the car steered straight! Also the transmission shifted smoothly through all 3 gears. (We also put more transmission oil in it before we drove it) Also on that drive we got the tires to "round out". We then did some research on the brake problem and some people said that the brake booster might be bad. One guy said to hold the pedal to the floor and start the car and see if the pedal moves down more. Then he said if it moves that means it is good. Well it moved!. Then I drove it around a little bit more and noticed that if you gave it some gas the pedal would come back up. But sometimes it would stick. Any help on this would greatly help! We don't know if the hose for the vacuum line is bad or not. I tink it is bad but my grandpa thinks not. Also the engine was running very bad because we had some vacuum leaks. My grandpa fixed that and adjusted the carb because it was idling very high! We got it running pretty good but it still doesn't run right. That is because the vacuum advance on the distributor is bad so does anyone know how to get a new one of those or how to fix it? Also on that last drive I did some pretty good drifts. That car is so much fun just driving around in circles! I even spun-out at one time! We also started cleaning and detailing the interior. We got the back of one seat pretty clean, but then we ran out of time. Does anyone know how to clean the interior on these cars?

Youtube videos are also coming soon!

Thanks Sam
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Be careful not to fill the transmission and rear end differential too much. The transmission on the GT is tilted so you want to fill it about a 1/3” to 1/2” shy of the plug, if you fill it all the way to the plug the rear seal will give and start leaking. I use the same rule of thumb on the rear end and it’s worked great for over 25 years.

On the brakes proceed with cation, the car has been sitting a long time sometimes things go well and the problem will work itself out by driving it (carefully) but drive it. Or, your problem will become obvious as it gets worse. It wouldn’t surprise me if the movement of normal use free’s things up and the pedal travel gets smoother. Also the brake booster rely’s heavily on vacuum, if the engine has a significant vacuum leak your vacuum will be weak at the booster and do very little work for you, brakes will feel mushy if it’s bad enough. Go to the local auto parts store and pick up a vacuum gauge and a 1/4” or smaller tee with a little hose. (if you don’t have the vacuum gauge already). Between 18-20 is good. Check the vacuum on the carburetor and manifold with the throttle plates open a little and see ifthere’s a significant difference.

I’m not sure if you tested the vacuum canister without the car running using a separate vacuum pump such as a Mityvac with a vacuum gauge tee’d in but you also need to measure the vacuum you put on the vacuum advance canister before you condemn anything on the distributor side. After you verify that the vacuum is good in the canister and if it’s still locked up you can try a tiny bit of WD-40 on the plates and see if you can free it up that way, careful not to spray too much. If it won’t hold a vacuum (pretty rare) then obviously the canister is no good.

Give those few suggestions a try and let us know how it goes. I usually remove and rebuild the distributor rather than replace it on my GT, most of the time there’s just something gummed up inside the distributor or there’s a broken spring in there. It doesn’t hurt to pick up a spare, keep your eyes open, people are always selling cannibalized parts from these 1.9 engines or call OGTS. It’s a good learning experience to take the distributor apart and there’s nothing too complicated in there. HTH

Note: I’m a bit lost as to why the fuel filter with the return line on the pics are shown it’s not attached very safely otherwise I’m not sure if you’re having any problems with it. I suggest you replace it in any case if you haven’t already :- )
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Yes we will keep on driving it! It is just so much fun! My grandpa has a vacuum gauge and he was getting around 16. We will probably mess around will the distributor and see what is wrong with it. I think the "fuel filter" is actually the electric fuel pump that we installed. We bolted it up there so it should stay.

Also my trans is an automatic is yours? Or is the oil thing only on the manuals?

Sam
 

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Yes we will keep on driving it! It is just so much fun! My grandpa has a vacuum gauge and he was getting around 16. We will probably mess around will the distributor and see what is wrong with it. I think the "fuel filter" is actually the electric fuel pump that we installed. We bolted it up there so it should stay.

Also my trans is an automatic is yours? Or is the oil thing only on the manuals?

Sam
Forgive me, I forgot that you have the automatic yes I was referring to the manual 4 speed transmission.
I wasn’t quite sure what the pictures represented.
Now here is another safety tip from one of us older grey hair members. Install an inertia switch that breaks the power to the fuel pump, they’re easy to install and could save lives in the event of a collision.
With the original fuel pump that was something that you didn’t have to worry about. That’s just what I did I have it mounted next to the brake booster. Glad you’re having fun!

If you’re vacuum needle is steady that’s a fine reading for the later model 71-73’ GT’s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
But is it good for a 1969?
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
Here is a video of us installing brakes on the GT
 

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But is it good for a 1969?
A worn 69’ perhaps, the timing chain stretch (late valve timing) can affect this as one example. the pistons in that engine were originally flat top pistons that raised both, the vacuum readings (a little) and the compression, I can’t remember if you did a cranking compression test or not but 150 plus or minus less than 10% would be a good number and 17-18” on the vacuum at idle. So long as the needle is steady on your vacuum gauge I wouldn’t worry at all.

Realistically the engine is bound to be worn so I’m expecting it’s right where it oughta be. My freshly built 2.0 runs 18” of vacuum at idle so you’re not too far off.
 
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