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Discussion Starter #1
I've got two cars here other than the Tinyvette, and by cars I mean GTs, because is there any other kind? Anyway, Rob's is getting a complete suspension and brake redo and that is going well. It is a California car (GT), last driven 15 years ago. Catherine's was a Colorado car (GT), stored in Wyoming, then in California, last driven 28 years ago. Catherine's car (GT) has the rust you'd expect, and it has been interesting. The engine runs well and she's got fresh brakes now, except when bleeding them the long hard line to the rear squirted fluid out. With the car (GT) all together replacing that looks like an interesting project. That's a long line! The car (GT) is on jack stands. I don't have a lift.

Any tips on how to proceed? Is it doable with a car (GT) just a foot off the ground, the engine and everything in, etc.?

I have a flaring tool. I guess I need to get a bending tool.

Mike
 

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Just Some Dude in Jersey
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I bought the titanium coated lines that OGTS sells and I used a cheap pair of tubing bending pliers. It was fun! My car was stripped when I did it, though. Yes, you should be able to do the rear line with the car intact.

Front lines would be darn near impossible to do with the engine in the car.

:veryhappy

Tip: Start at the brakes and work your way towards the MC.
 

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I've got two cars here other than the Tinyvette, and by cars I mean GTs, because is there any other kind? Anyway, Rob's is getting a complete suspension and brake redo and that is going well. It is a California car (GT), last driven 15 years ago. Catherine's was a Colorado car (GT), stored in Wyoming, then in California, last driven 28 years ago. Catherine's car (GT) has the rust you'd expect, and it has been interesting. The engine runs well and she's got fresh brakes now, except when bleeding them the long hard line to the rear squirted fluid out. With the car (GT) all together replacing that looks like an interesting project. That's a long line! The car (GT) is on jack stands. I don't have a lift.

Any tips on how to proceed? Is it doable with a car (GT) just a foot off the ground, the engine and everything in, etc.?

I have a flaring tool. I guess I need to get a bending tool.

Mike
I have 2 bending tools, a little one for tight radii and a bigger one, it took both to do the job. I used the OGTS kit. 12" off the ground will make it tough but you can do it. When you take the old lines off try to keep them somewhat intact so you have a good idea of what bends you have to make on the new ones. If it gets ridiculous with the engine in the car you can always split the line and put in a union but that does add 2 more possible leak points.
 

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When I did my restoration of the yellow GT, I installed the engine first and ran the brake lines later. Wasn't that bad. I did it in my garage up on jack stands. I agree that you should remove the old lines first and then bend the new ones out on the floor to match them. Be sure to mark the connections at the MC. I know from experience that you can easily mix them up. If you do, you won't be able to bleed all 4 wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks. You're not discouraging me. ;)

I'd think for the long line to the rear that starting at the master cylinder would be best. There are more bends on that end.

I figure if I can poke the line through the hole in the radiator support first and have it go outside the engine cross-member support I'm off to a good start.

Seeing as the long line has a hole it in, I suppose I should think seriously about replacing all hard lines.

Mike
 

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You can pick up a 50' roll of soft brake (bendable) line and just fish it through.
My son used that stuff for his fuel line and got it through the whole car in about 15 minutes. Brake lines shouldn't be much harder.
 

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I've recently started using 'cupro' brake lines....copper/nickel which bends nicely, doesn't work harden like soft copper, doesn't rust, and is DOT approved.
Definitely bends and flares easier than regular steel.
 

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The best tip for routing brake lines I ever came across, was to use electrical wire to create a model of all the bends you need to do. I liked the idea so much, I've never forgotten it. Maybe it will help you out when you can't really work under the car. Bend the wire by hand while under the car, then bend the tubing in a comfier position. Tape could help hold long pieces in place.
 

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Really, I need to pull the engine? My left front brake line is broken off about an inch out of where it comes into the fender well. Do I need to order the whole OGTS Brake Tubing Set? No way to bend the tube with the engine in?


I bought the titanium coated lines that OGTS sells and I used a cheap pair of tubing bending pliers. It was fun! My car was stripped when I did it, though. Yes, you should be able to do the rear line with the car intact.


:veryhappy

Tip: Start at the brakes and work your way towards the MC.
 

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You don't "need" the OGTS set. You can determine the right length you need and buy from any auto parts store. OGTS just does the hard part for you. You could also buy the tube and a flange tool and make one from scratch.
You don't "need" to remove the engine. It's just easier if the engine is out.
 

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Where did you get the flexible brake line? What size for the left front brake?

You can pick up a 50' roll of soft brake (bendable) line and just fish it through.
My son used that stuff for his fuel line and got it through the whole car in about 15 minutes. Brake lines shouldn't be much harder.
 

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Thanks. What about the fitting sizes on each end of the tubing? I'm thinking the flexible brake line is the way to go.

You don't "need" the OGTS set. You can determine the right length you need and buy from any auto parts store. OGTS just does the hard part for you. You could also buy the tube and a flange tool and make one from scratch.
You don't "need" to remove the engine. It's just easier if the engine is out.
 

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Really, I need to pull the engine? My left front brake line is broken off about an inch out of where it comes into the fender well. Do I need to order the whole OGTS Brake Tubing Set? No way to bend the tube with the engine in?
I replaced my front LH brake line. Prefer to remove radiator, then alternator, rather than removing distributor for access.
Remove front LH tire while GT is on front jack stands. Start at fender area, then progress towards the master cylinder.
Flare tubing for front brake hose connection (or purchase pre-flared line), then start the tubing bends.
Allow extra length for line at master cylinder. Flare tool requires approx 1.0 inch clearance to flare.

Purchased 25-ft. coiled brake line. First line I fabricated was a mess. Second line matches Opel OEM.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Replacing the rears went well. I had to cut the line running to the front, twice. I figure to replace it I'll make the s-bend on the bench and do the rest after getting under the car. From the engine back will be pretty easy, but engine-forward wiill take a little more finesse.

I've got the OGTS brake line kit. It's pretty nice, but makes screwing up just that much more painful.

Mike
 

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Bendable brake line is available at the parts store. So is a flange tool.

My son worked for a parts company so he'd buy stuff with his discount.
 
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