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help!!!! Can some one tell me what i need to get and how to fix my problem.ok it is that metal fuel line at the back of the car on the drivers side of the muffler.(Im not talking about the vent line.) I have fifty bucks to get this fixed. my Gt hasn't been started in about two months, and needs to be. if it is on opel gt source let me know the exact name of it. It would be better if you know of a common auto parts store that i can go to and get the part. if all possible please give details step by step. this is my first car and i want to restore it properly. hopefully when im done I'll have the best car in town...:D thanks a million..
Billy
 

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Billy, give OGTS a call and ask them if they have the metal fuel line coming from the tank. They will know what you are talking about. I don't believe it will be an auto parts store item because it is a metric fitting. Others have taken out the fuel tank, a fairly big task and replaced the fitting by welding in another female AN or SAE fitting. Not a good thing with gas fumes in the tank. It would have to be purged first. Look for other sources also. Jim Marchitto at USA Opel may have a line from some of the cars he's making pieces out of. To contact him, go to the second page of the Opel Sources. HTH.

Ron
 

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Old Opeler
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Fuel Line

OpelGTSource has the items listed as:

9049 Fuel line and fittings for GT gas tank line. Metal fuel tank line

with a list cost of $19.00 on my October 31st, 2002 price list.

http://www.opelgtsource.com

Order yourself a catalogue as well - invaluable info.

Pic of components:
 

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OPEL-LESS!!!
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you'll probably have to order the "kit" that GTJIM posted. maybe you'll get lucky, like i have.....twice. you can buy some of the steel line, that copper nut piece with the right size flare, and trying to find that copper piece with metric threads is not a easy thing to do, then you have to bend the line all up. so buy time you buy the farrell too, you basically spent 10 bucks, 5 bucks in gas money, and an hour of your day, and still have to mess around with a bunch of crap that you wont with the kit. so unless you have it all in the barn like i did, which i doubt you do, listen to GTJIM.
 

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I ordered this a few years back from OGTS and mine was a straight piece of copper with the proper fittings. Has OGTS changed their part with a prebent piece of non copper pipe?
 

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Pipes

jlthunder,

I have a sneaking suspison that the pic is not the OGTS kit but another one - for a GT still - with stainless steel fittings and tube.
It was the only picture I could find when posting the message.
At least it shows the components necessary!
 

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On my 72 GT which has the original fuel outlet line from the tank, the line is steel and also the fitting. I would opt for a similar steel line, a copper line will, as stated before will work harden under vibes and eventually break. HTH.

Ron
 

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Namba;

Replace that line NOW!!! It is over 30 years old and mine looked good until I touched it and it came off in my hands. You don't want that to happen since it is located over the rear muffler. I've heard of stories of flaming opels. NOT FUN
 

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jtthunder, I've already checked out the tube, and although it has severe surface rust and pits, it is still a "servicable" item. BUT, before the tank goes back in the car, it will be replaced. Happily, I can replace it any time, due to the access of it. I'm still a far piece from putting the GT back together. I've got to fabricate a return line fitting in the tank so I can hook up the fuel rail and fuel pump bypass lines back to the tank. The plan is to weld a boss to the filler neck with a line attached to go to within an inch of the bottom of the tank. Gil at OGTS suggested that, so I wouldn't have the constant sound of fuel splashing in the bottom of the tank when the pump is running. I do appreciate the heads up though, I don't want to have a fireball in the driveway, it would probably set off the dogs when the Fire Dept arrives.:D

Ron
 

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boomerang opeler
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ron if you put a "t"in the pickup line between tank and pump so the return goes into the pump instead of the tank you avoid the sound of perpetual running fuel and still have a return path for fuel to the low pressure side of the pump
 

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JT, I hate it when that happens. I know I'll go ballistic if that happens to my car after it gets painted.

Baz, I want the fuel to go back into the tank for cooling purposes. The pump I've got has a pressure bypass and a return flow to keep the pump cool coming from the same outlet and the fuel rail has a bypass also that I'll have to "T" into the pump return. Basically that means as long as the pump is running there will be a small amount of fuel returning to the tank, and with the fuel rail bypass setting at 50 psi and the pump bypassing at 70 psi, I'll also have a continual flow coming from the fuel rail too, regardless of the throttle setting. It's an Air Force thing I learned on the Blackbird. If the fuel was too hot, it was sent back to a specific fuel tank to cool off and in the process heat up liquid nitrogen to pressurize the fuel tanks. With the skin of the aircraft getting up to 1000 degrees, and no fuel bladders to insulate the fuel from the skin, you don't want air in the tanks.:(

Ron
 

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boomerang opeler
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sorry ron i did not think you were still aiming for those kind of speeds(sr71) where you get heat transfer to the tanks
still if you can get close to b-bird speeds it will make a good 1/4 mile machine:D
on a serious note i remember now that you did say the pump you were using needed to run that way
but its still a valid option for us lesser mortals and i know from the past that it works just fine;)
 

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Baz, It probably wouldn't make any difference if I set it up the way you recommended if I was running a pump without a bypass in it, but with the fuel recirculating continously through the pump, there is a small chance of the fuel continually retaining some heat. But with the long run from the fuel pump forward to the engine, there should be enough radiated heat into the fuel line for heat dissipation in both directions. I just want to run two lines, pressure and return to the back of the car and "T" in the return lines at the tank. With low pressure electric fuel pumps, for carbed engines, there should be no problem, but with the higher pressure FI fuel pumps, the increase in pressure also generates heat.

Ron
 
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