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Opeler
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Discussion Starter #21
I thought he would be in the heater box where there is a "squirrel cage" blower assembly. :)
In going through the interior, not a single wire was not eaten. I will have to go through all vents and cavities to vac out nesting material and eaten wires.
A thought just occurred to me that my avatar is out of date since the red gt is donating its organs to the orange one. And since the wiring in the orance one is toast, the entire wiring harness too. I will have to figure out how to change the avatar.
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter #22
Regarding the mounted squirrel, only the rear claws were recognizable. I sometimes get weird looks as it is. Adding that to the rear view mirror would not make it better.
 
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How about an Arizona car for $6k? Not mine but almost a twin. He's calling it a '73, but the wheels, tail lights and color all say '70 to me. Can't tell from photos whether it has vent windows, which all 73's had.

 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter #25
How about an Arizona car for $6k? Not mine but almost a twin. He's calling it a '73, but the wheels, tail lights and color all say '70 to me. Can't tell from photos whether it has vent windows, which all 73's had.

While cleaning out spare tire deck, amoung all of the animal stuff, i found a box inside the spare tire. Imagine my surprise.
428216
428217
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter #28
I like that you're sticking around to see what happened to your old wheels :)
Not the one i found. Mine is in far better shape. Probably keep this one as it hasn’t been used much. No grease on pages or fading. Also found a map of san jose in the door panel. First time I ever found one in the pocket I think was designed for it!
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter #29
Not the one i found. Mine is in far better shape. Probably keep this one as it hasn’t been used much. No grease on pages or fading. Also found a map of san jose in the door panel. First time I ever found one in the pocket I think was designed for it!
Maybe i should leave map in car to keep it authentic
 
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Not the one i found. Mine is in far better shape. Probably keep this one as it hasn’t been used much. No grease on pages or fading. Also found a map of san jose in the door panel. First time I ever found one in the pocket I think was designed for it!
That was the "GPS" :)
 

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Opeler
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Discussion Starter #32
Well, it’s been a while since i posted about the progress i’ve made on the Gt, and i have found lots of nesting material from the animals that lived in the car, and in some interesting places. Lots of walnut shells too.
From the headlight covers, under the gas tank, the kick panel vents, wiper motor area and even tried to chew through the air filter to get into the carburetor. The steel mesh on the filter held them back. I have most of the body cleaned up and the gas tank out. All rubber lines are toast. Some pics to follow. Tonight i started in on removing the air conditioning from the wrecked Gt donating its organs. Bittersweet in removing the items i had saved and then installed. The air conditioning will be for sale if anyone is interested. The condenser up front‘s fins are pretty flattened from the battery, but i will include the entire unit with the mounting scews, hoses, fans, and even the pulleys. The vacuum idle switch went bad and never replaced.when totally removed, i will post pics.
 

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Likely turned over 100k. Even in the age of planned obsolecense (sp), a car will go 170,000 miles unless the PO never changed the oil.
This was not exactly correct in the 1960s into the '70s. In those years, 50,000 miles was a good time to think about trading in the family chariot. Front suspension ball joints and bushings were shot, the exhaust system was disintegrating, and, especially in the northeastern states, the body was generally suffering from tinworm. The engine was smoking and perhaps making a variety of noises. Bearing material and oil quality was not what it is today, nor were the various metal alloys that were used. As for the drivetrain, the manual transmission was probably on its second clutch and awaiting its third; the automatic transmission was wheezing between gears. The shock absorbers all around were long gone. Worn out bushings in the rear suspension had the car tramping.

We have become spoiled by the reliability of today's automobile. Where once we performed a full tuneup on the ignition system every year or 12,000 miles (whichever came first), today my two BMWs get new sparkplugs every 100,000 miles whether they need them or not. We used to change oil every 3,000 miles and the filter every 6,000, while today the manufacturer recommendations are much more extended. I purchased a GT new in 1970 and put almost 200,000 miles on it over about 17 years, but during that time the engine and transmission were both completely torn down and rebuilt. My two Beemers today, a 2002 330ci and a 2006 330ci droptop have 250,000 and 190,000 miles respectively, with no major repairs on them -- other than one differential seal that required a new stub axle, most of the repair issues have involved replacement of sensors, the other exceptions being one water pump, two thermostats and a door lock.

I laugh when the financial press (including the Wall Street Journal) reports on studies that indicate a smaller proportion of the population can afford a new car today than fifty years ago. This is nonsense because people that bought cars fifty years ago soon found that they could not afford the combination of monthly payments plus maintenance costs.
 

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My theory is that was how long the old Solex carbs would last before an issue cropped up that no one could figure out. With no Weber option at the time and the high expense of a dealer part, they got parked.
Note that the car pictured does not have the original Solex on it. In those years, it was not hard to figure out a carburetor problem, most especially with the 1970 Opel GT. The one that I purchased new off the dealer's lot came from the factory with no in-line fuel filter. It was not long, perhaps two years, before the car began to run poorly, necessitating the carburetor be torn down for rebuild (and eventual replacement). I did not spend a lot of time under the hood when it was new and had not noticed the absence of the filter (I was young!). When I did notice this, I made the rash assumption that the Solex had an adequate filter screen on the inlet side.
 

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Detritus Maximus
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I didn't look at the carb when I posted. I was just responding to Gordon's post.
It's a theory...
 
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Opeler
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MOST of the GT's I ended up with had 70K-80K miles on them.

The Solex carb theory is plausible. My first and second ones were a bear on certain brands of gas. The second one was the first time I did a Weber swap and it lived many more years until I crashed it.
70-80k miles is about how long my Solex lasted until it wouldn't idle at all. I was really busy at the time and the GT was my commuter car, so I put a new weber on and never tried to resolve the Solex problem. The Weber ran good right out of the box.
Another reason that so many of these cars died at around that mileage was that Buick stopped selling them in the mid-late '70s, then stopped working on them in their shops, then stopped supporting them with parts by the late '70's or early '80's. There was a period there when you really had to scratch to find parts for them, so many GT's just got parked out back and forgotten at that mileage because it was just hard to keep them running then.
 
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